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So all of a sudden my MacBook went really slow, I contacted apple support tried everything they said, resetting nvram e.t.c, wiped out my entire disk and reinstalled the macOS, but the problem still not solved. After analysing the activity monitor I found that kernel task was taking 20-90% of the cpu most of the time on the higher side(70-90%) so I researched on internet found that it is the broken port or broken sound card that is causing this issue, and there were some people (or a person) saying that disabling the port will fix this.

Note: I am pretty much certain that my upper left port is not functioning well, sometimes it works and sometimes I have rotate the charging pin and insert it again to make it work, so it's not sound card or any other component that's causing the issue but the port.

So long story short, I want to disable my port.

macOS Catalina 10.15.6, MacBook Pro 13 inch with two thunderbolt 3 ports, 2017

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  • Plug the power in the other side & see what happens. I'm not sure what you've read, A port with nothing in it is inactive, which would make me doubt the advice you were given. but kernel_task ramps up to keep your Mac cool. Swapping the side the power goes in can affect tha. It's a simple first thing to try. BTW, the Activity monitor CPU %age is for one core, not the whole Mac. If kernel_task really needs to cool things, you can see it at 500% or more, so you're not really having any major issues.
    – Tetsujin
    Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 16:17
  • kernel is taking 70-90% cpu without me doing anything, just logged in and opened the activity monitor, and this issue still arises even when I am not charging. One core are you sure? one core and 80% cpu usage? and for few seconds when kernel task usage is low, my Mac booms(is fast). Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 16:23
  • One core, yes I'm sure. Check the overall figures at the bottom left & check your temperatures - here's a [randomly googled] list of temperature testers if you don't have one - bestmaccleaner.com/mac-temperature-monitor
    – Tetsujin
    Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 16:34
  • "A port with nothing in it is inactive", that's a really interesting point, what if it's broken or malfunctioning from the inside. Temperatures are all fine I have already checked it. Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 16:35
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    Please try & test the things I've already asked rather than running off down another blind alley.
    – Tetsujin
    Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 16:36

1 Answer 1

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So long story short, I want to disable my port.

Technically, you can't.

The Thunderbolt ports really cannot be disabled because they are used for functions outside the operating system like charging. So, even if you completely uninstall macOS the ports will continue to function, accepting and negotiating a charge.

The most you can hope to do is disable them from the OS, however, that's an all or nothing proposition. The kexts are for all of the ports; not for each port.

I am pretty much certain that my upper left port is not functioning well, sometimes it works and sometimes I have rotate the charging pin and insert it again to make it work,

Have you tested the cable? The port is reversible so you shouldn't need to "rotate the charging pin;" there's actually two of them - one on each "side" of the cable (Vbus). If it is the port, why disable it? Why not just not use it or better yet, take it in to have the port replaced? There are board level repair outfits that specialize in this type of repair.

Now, if you are getting CPU spikes then it is possible there's a short between one of the power pins and a data bin (i.e. Vbus and TX1/RX1). If these spikes occur while a cable is plugged in, again, try changing the cable. If they occur regardless, then the problem is your port and it must be fixed. If it's a physical problem, you either have to physically disable it (cut the connectors so it's no longer usable) or if you're going to go that far, just fix the port.

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  • "If they occur regardless, then the problem is your port and it must be fixed. If it's a physical problem, you either have to physically disable it (cut the connectors so it's no longer usable) or if you're going to go that far, just fix the port." This is the case, Thanks a lot, i think this is something i cannot do on my own, plus there is no apple support in my area so i will have to ship it through someone and get it fixed :'( Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 21:07
  • And unlike most PCs with a configurable "BIOS" the Mac has no such interface, as Apple builds the hardware and everything that can be adjusted is done in macOS, or at worse by resetting PRAM/NVRAM/SMC to defaults at boot. Commented Sep 9, 2020 at 22:17

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