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I was in a summer camp. I left my computer behind and had a lengthy discussion with my peers. After I've come back, I found my computer with black screen. I thought that my computer ran out of power and hibernates automatically. To this point, everything looks normal.

I'm in a hurry, so I just close the laptop and put it in my bag. Because I also have an external HDD attached, I take extra care so that nothing is crushed. I didn't disconnect the HDD in fear that when the computer resume the system will complain about sudden removal about it.

When I get home, I immediately connects it to a working charger and connects to a gigabit network through thunderbolt 3 adapter before I open the laptop. After I open the lid and enter the firmware password (for security reasons, I configured the mode to be full). The resume screen does not appear. Instead, a normal boot screen appeared, followed by a normal login screen. After I logged in, apps began launching and showing up. I know it's not a resume because Google Chrome told me that it had been shut down improperly.

The battery is about 10% when I logged in. Plus, I've encountered sleep wake failures (either the SSD is full, or something happened), and it will generate a crash file. I looked in /library/logs/diagnosticreports and found no crash file. I looked in /var/logs/system.log and found no suspicious messages. I looked at my own log file generated by running "log stream --level debug > syslog" that is running before the shutdown and found no related messages.

To try and capture a "snapshot" of the system, I did two sysdiagnose, one on the following startup, and another after another restart.

Question: How could I find out what cause the shutdown and how to prevent it?

System Configuration:

macOS High Sierra 10.13.6 (17G65)
MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)

Output of df -k /:

Filesystem   1024-blocks      Used Available Capacity iused               ifree %iused  Mounted on
/dev/disk1s1   488245288 427684144  56198540    89% 3041607 9223372036851734200    0%   /

Output of ls -l /var/vm/sleepimage*:

-rw------T  1 root  wheel  1073741824  8 11 13:22 /var/vm/sleepimage

Output of pmset -g custom:

Battery Power:
 lidwake              1
 autopoweroff         1
 autopoweroffdelay    28800
 standbydelay         10800
 standby              1
 ttyskeepawake        1
 hibernatemode        3
 powernap             0
 gpuswitch            2
 hibernatefile        /var/vm/sleepimage
 displaysleep         15
 sleep                15
 tcpkeepalive         1
 halfdim              1
 acwake               0
 lessbright           1
 disksleep            10
AC Power:
 lidwake              1
 autopoweroff         1
 autopoweroffdelay    28800
 standbydelay         10800
 standby              1
 ttyskeepawake        1
 hibernatemode        3
 powernap             1
 gpuswitch            2
 hibernatefile        /var/vm/sleepimage
 displaysleep         60
 womp                 1
 networkoversleep     0
 sleep                0
 tcpkeepalive         1
 halfdim              1
 acwake               0
 disksleep            0
  • I have a usual suspect at hand. Could you add to your original question: df -k /, ls -l /var/vm/sleepimage* and pmset -g custom? – dan Aug 10 at 10:40

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