2

I am using a Mac mini (2018) with a 3.0GHz 6-core Intel Core i5 processor. My understanding is that this chip has 6 physical cores.

The Activity Monitor shows performance graphs for 6 cores. On other Macs with Hyper-Threading enabled by default, Activity Monitor shows the number of effective/virtual cores, i.e., twice the number of physical cores.

So does the display of 6 cores on this Mac mini mean:

  • Hyper-Threading is not offered by this chip?

  • Hyper-Threading is disabled by default by Apple now (likely because of the Intel CPU flaws)?

  • This chip really has only 3 cores, and 6 virtual?

1
  • Hyper-Threading is not offered by this chip?

Correct. This chip does not feature Intel Hyper-Threading technology.

Hyper-Threading is disabled by default by Apple now

No.

This chip really has only 3 cores, and 6 virtual?

This chip has 6 physical cores.


Out of all the variants offered by Apple, Hyper-Threading feature is available only in the 3.2GHz 6‑core 8th‑generation Intel Core i7 variant.

A note for the technically minded: The Core i3 model that we tested doesn't offer either Turbo Boost of Hyper-Threading technology. If you upgrade to a Core i5 model, you'll get Turbo Boost, which lets the clock speed ramp up for short bursts. If you opt for the Core i7 model, you'll get both Turbo Boost and Hyper-Threading for more multithread capability.

  • Thanks for the info. I will consider the lack of Hyper-Threading to be a bonus feature after all the Meltdown/Spectre security vulnerabilities. – Basil Bourque Jul 2 at 23:30
1

Hyper-Threading is offered by some models of CPUs in the 2018 Mac Mini. The base-level 3.0 Ghz Core i5 does not offer Hyper-Threading however.

I'm writing this on a 2018 Mac Mini with the 3.2 Ghz Core i7 CPU - and it does indeed display 12 graphs in Activity Monitor indicating that Hyper-Threading is enabled and used.

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .