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I've been suspecting my iPhone to be hacked for quite some times now. After setting the two-factor authentication system on it earlier this week, a connection attempt has been made by someone else (I've received an authentication code on my second phone when I clearly didn't try to connect in any way).

So i've started digging into my iPhone and this is what I've found in the Siri and search list of apps:

A supposed app without an icon. This was the one and only app from the list that has this behavior. So I've used the search bar to find this app:

and it seemed like its hidding in the system files when I taped on it led me to the iCloud interface.

So first of all is it a spyware? If yes, then how can I prove it and get information about who installed it (like getting the IP address it is sending information to for example)?

And finally, how can I get rid of it?

P.S.: Note that the official News app from Apple is called 'Apple News' and has an icon: Apple News Homepage

  • It's highly likely that your phone isn't hacked and no spyware is installed. This isn't very common and easy thing to do, due to the nature of iOS is designed. You can start by locating this "icon less app" under Settings app → General → iPhone Storage and you should be able to uninstall it by tapping the app name and selecting Delete App. – Nimesh Neema May 3 at 19:29
  • Thank you Nimesh Neema. I've just searched in the iphone storage list and this app is not available in the list. – Da Silva Lionel May 3 at 19:49
  • If you browse to Settings app → Siri & Search, you can spot other "icon less" apps such as Contacts, Maps etc. (which are 1st party, Apple apps). A likely explanation is that the News entry that you see refers to Apple News app. – Nimesh Neema May 3 at 19:52
  • Regarding the code that you received on your other phone, it's just a verification code sent by Apple on other "Trusted" device. So nothing to worry there. – Nimesh Neema May 3 at 19:52
  • even tho i haven't installed Apple News app and it's the only app that is doing that ? Contact and all the native apps appear correctly and can be found in the iPhone Storage list – Da Silva Lionel May 3 at 19:59
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The entry that you see corresponds to Apple's News app. The icon isn't displayed because you don't have the app installed on your iPhone.

After setting the two-factor authentication system on it earlier this week, a connection attempt has been made by someone else (I've received an authentication code on my second phone when I clearly didn't try to connect in any way).

There is apparently no unintended connection attempt. You appear to have received the verification code from Apple on one of your "other" trusted device (which is expected behavior after turning on Two-factor authentication).

So first of all is it a spyware?

No, it isn't a spyware.

  • 'You appear to have received the verification code from Apple on one of your "other" trusted device (which is expected behavior after turning on Two-factor authentication).' But can apple send this kind of notification days after the initial set up ? Because it was another message that came long after the initial one – Da Silva Lionel May 3 at 20:09
  • @DaSilvaLionel The notification is sent only when a login attempt is made. – Nimesh Neema May 3 at 20:10
  • So someone has indeed attempt to connect to my apple account and had access to my password which i have changed before setting up the two factor security check on my phone (and i live alone). Another weird thing is that the number that send the notication message is different depending on the plateform used to attempt the connection. this message seem to related to a connection attempt from my phone. Even though the News app above is not a spyware is there any way someone could have hacked my phone and got access to my password ? Supposing that it is the case, how can i find out ? – Da Silva Lionel May 3 at 20:16
  • The verification code number is completely random and regenerated at every attempt. It's probable someone may have access to your password, but it couldn't be obtained by "hacking" your iPhone. Maybe the culprit obtained it by social engineering (guessing based on information they have about you). Two-factor authentication does have your back. It is recommended that you change your password again. Try to use an un-guessable/random password. – Nimesh Neema May 3 at 20:20
  • Also, before receiving the Two-factor authentication code, you'll receive an alert stating that an attempt has been made to login. The alert will contain the name and type of device along with the approximate location of login attempt. That may possibly help you in catching the culprit. – Nimesh Neema May 3 at 20:22

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