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I have multiple Apple TVs in my apartments, all connected to the same network.

I want to block the possibility for the guest to stream video or connect to other Apple TV excluded the Apple TV in their single room (ex: guest in cabin 1 can't controls the ATV in cabin 2).

It is possible?

  • Hmm, I'm not an expert but I guess this is only possible with like dedicated routers in all the rooms, so e.g. Room 1 has a repeater where the guests phone and Apple TV is connected to. All guest don't have access to the main Wi-Fi, only to the repeater. – muuvmuuv Apr 10 at 9:16
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Yes, on the AppleTV you can set how AirPlay can be used by opening Settings and then AirPlay and then pressing "Allow Access".

On the guest room AppleTV, you would set it to for example "Anyone on the Same Network".

On the other AppleTVs, you would set it to "Only People Sharing this Home" or "Require Password".

This means that the guest cannot send an AirPlay stream to the other AppleTVs, unless ofcourse he gains access to the password, or you share your Home with the guest.

  • Thank jksoegaard. In your opinion, it's possible to work on the switch for making the same thing – fparra Apr 10 at 10:24
  • What do you mean by “work on the switch”? What switch are you referring to? – jksoegaard Apr 10 at 12:27
  • We use Ubiquiti Unifi 48 port switch. I mean is it possible to create "rules" that don't allows users to see other ATV? I've read something about VLANs but i'm afraid that if I create a VLAN for ATV, i need to change the ATV IP address or subnet – fparra Apr 10 at 13:46
  • Yes, you can use VLANs to separate the AppleTVs. However if you want to use the network for anything else than AirPlay Screen Mirroring, you’ll probably want the AppleTV and your devices to have an internet connection. In that case you would also need a router. In any standard setting this would mean separate subnets, IP addresss change and either two routers or a multi-port router. – jksoegaard Apr 10 at 16:41
  • Just to add to the previous: By "multi-port" I did not necessarily mean "physical" ports. If the router supports VLAN and allows routing seperate on those virtual interfaces, that is ofcourse just as good. Ordinary home routers do not support these things typically. – jksoegaard Apr 10 at 20:40

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