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I have a 2TB external USB drive. I formatted it using OSX Extended encrypted.

I'd like to have it available on my local network preferably without having to have it permanently connect to one of my Macs. My router (from EE) doesn't support it. Infuriatingly, neither does my Apple Time Capsule.

AirPort base stations don't support encrypted formats or disks formatted as APFS, ExFAT, or NTFS.

Other than connecting it to a Mac, how can I have it available on my network? Is there a router or other network device that would allow me to access the drive? I have a Synology NAS but I don't believe it will support the drive format either.

If it makes a difference, it's not a backup drive. I use it to store personal documents that I'd prefer to have encrypted.

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I don't believe an off-the-shelf router or networking device exists that contains this feature.

If you want to do it without connecting it to a Mac, you can use the libfvde program to mount the drive on a Linux system and use that to make it available on the network.

I haven't tried it with a Synology NAS, but as the Synology DSM is Linux-based and allows installing third party programs, it should at least in theory be possible to install libfvde here, mount the drive, and make it available on the network.

You can download libfvde here:

https://github.com/libyal/libfvde

  • Thanks for this. I've accepted your answer but have not (yet) implemented it. There are a couple of issues - libfvde is currently released as "experimental". Also I have to build it on my Synology NAS, but as far as I can tell, the Synology operating system doesn't come with gcc built-in and it's not straightforward to install it. – Bumptious Q Bangwhistle Mar 26 at 18:01
  • You do not have to build it on the NAS necessarily, you can use a cross-compiler on your desktop PC. – jksoegaard Mar 26 at 19:13

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