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Just as in UNIX based system the init process is the parent of all the processes and similarly, the zygote process in Android OS has the sole purpose of launching other processes.


What is the name of the iOS equivalent process?

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    kernel_task, PID 0. Bit the details are a bit more complicated, which practical problem are you trying to solve? – nohillside Jul 8 '18 at 7:45
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    I am learning about operating systems. I was just curious. I think kernel_task is for macOS, is it the same for iOS? – Sohel Shaikh Jul 8 '18 at 7:55
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    Most likely, but you probably are better of by reading some more detailed documentation about how macOS launches processes etc. The name of the process started at boot time isn’t really important here. – nohillside Jul 8 '18 at 8:03
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    developer.apple.com/library/archive/navigation/# might be a good starting point – nohillside Jul 8 '18 at 8:59
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    @nohillside It is not kernel_task (pid 0), it doesn't have the responsibility of launching up all the user space processes. Instead it is launchd (pid 1). This is the way Unix-systems have traditionally been allocating PID numbers... PID 1 is the process responsible for launching the user space, while PID 0 is a kernel pseudo-process responsible for swapping, scheduling and/or other kernel side functionality. – jksoegaard Jul 8 '18 at 10:33
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The name of the equivalent process on iOS and macOS is launchd.

It is run with PID 1 and it the parent of all other running user-space processes. The objective of launchd is similar to initd - having the responsibility of launching other processes during boot and various other phases of the system lifetime.

This is in thread with traditional Unix-based systems, where PID 1 is reserved for the process that is responsible for launching the user space part of the system. This was traditionally initd, but on modern systems that is often replaced with alternatives such as launchd (on macOS), systemd, upstart, and other init systems.

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