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Current Beta access program enables one to upgrade to macOS Mojave from a stable release, but I want to try out a fresh installation instead of upgrading with previous data, so that I can assess it better.

I've downloaded an application named "macOS Mojave Beta" from the App Store, and running it would presumably result in an upgrade. Now I wonder what to do next. Would creating a bootable installer and booting from it be a good idea, when I'm working with a Beta version?

  • Ignoring all the "should you do this" comments, have you tried making a bootable installer like you do any other macOS installer? Instructions here from Apple support.apple.com/en-us/ht201372 – Steve Chambers Jul 5 '18 at 13:55
  • @SteveChambers I’ve made a couple of bootable installers for Windows and Linux, and I suppose making one for macOS won’t be too different? Actually I’ve already linked to the instructions in my post, but thanks anyway! – nalzok Jul 5 '18 at 14:15
  • Hi @SteveChambers That should probably be an answer as opposed to a comment. I would also caution people - the beta seed program has a pretty clear confidentiality clause. We can discuss that on Ask Different Meta and this specific thread on meta. apple.meta.stackexchange.com/questions/3263/… – bmike Jul 5 '18 at 14:44
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There's some misconceptions here. Let's clear them up....

Current Beta access program enables one to upgrade to macOS Mojave from a stable release,

No, it gives you access to prerelease software that you can install on your device. They make no mention "enablement of upgrade." Granted, since Mojave hasn't been released, it will be a de facto "upgrade"

Would creating a bootable installer and booting from it be a good idea, when I'm working with a Beta version?

A better question would be, "Why wouldn't it be a good idea?"

A beta is, again, prerelease software and it will have bugs.

Please note that since the public beta software has not yet been commercially released by Apple, it may contain errors or inaccuracies and may not function as well as commercially released software.

When you download the software, you are presumed to have read and be aware of this. There's nothing precluding you from attempting to install it via USB and it's encouraged. Should you find an issue, report it to Apple.

And....

It's important to note that Mojave and all beta software in general is being made publicly with the expectation that you leave feedback about issues/problems/bugs that you discover. Expecting the software to function without issue or as a fix for what plagues released software is an unrealistic expectation.

In other words, don't run this on a "production" machine and make lots of backups of your data.

  • Yeah I know it will contain bugs, but I don’t think that will make it unsuitable for everyday work like developing softwares (with git or some other VCS, of course) or reading documents. Anyway, it’s the Beta version rather than the Alpha version, so I’m expecting misaligned buttons but not kernel panics. Do you think that’s too reckless? – nalzok Jul 5 '18 at 12:15
  • I was on beta for a few weeks, and didn't experience any kernel panics. Although I can't promise anything on other machines. – bret7600 Jul 5 '18 at 12:24
  • so I’m expecting misaligned buttons but not kernel panics - IMO, this is an unrealistic expectation. Kernel panics can be caused by any number of things (bad hardware addressing) and is not limited to Alpha versions. Use the Beta program to test, learn, and develop. However, don't go into this with the expectation that it will only have minor inconveniences. – Allan Jul 5 '18 at 12:29
  • @nalzok To shift your "everyday work" to such beta stuff without a bootable clone of your current system would be a mistake, hopefully that is not your intention. – Tom Gewecke Jul 5 '18 at 14:14

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