4

I am using a MacBook Pro 15" Mid-2015, running macOS High Sierra 10.13.3.

The current cycle count is 505, and battery "State of Health" according to coconut Battery is 85.2%.

Here is the battery information as displayed by the system report:

Battery Information:

  Model Information:
  Serial Number:
  Manufacturer: SMP
  Device Name:
  Pack Lot Code:    0
  PCB Lot Code: 0
  Firmware Version: 702
  Hardware Revision:    1
  Cell Revision:    3241
  Charge Information:
  Charge Remaining (mAh):   6316
  Fully Charged:    No
  Charging: No
  Full Charge Capacity (mAh):   7460
  Health Information:
  Cycle Count:  505
  Condition:    Normal
  Battery Installed:    Yes
  Amperage (mA):    -1269
  Voltage (mV): 12124

I suspect some unusual activity with the battery which is not normal. Half an hour ago the battery was fully-charged, it is now at 84% charge.

I'm not running any energy-intensive app, as determined by the energy tab in Activity Monitor app, as shown in the illustration below:

enter image description here

Additionally, my MacBooks dies without any warning. macOS used to notify of low charge previously, but now it just dies without any notification.

I've never seen the percentage when it dies but I am suspicious that the battery isn't hitting 0%.

How do I resolve the issue.

  • It is recommended to contact Apple authorised service provider and get your MacBook Pro diagnosed by a technician. If you bought an AppleCare, you may be eligible for free service and repairs. – Nimesh Neema Mar 28 '18 at 7:27
  • 3
    Possible duplicate of Fully charged MacBook Air turns off when power cord removed – Allan Mar 28 '18 at 7:38
  • As in the linked dupe - the key here is to look at the Amperage. Your's is negative meaning you have an issue with the battery - it's dead or dying. If after an SMC reset the problem remains, it's time to change the battery. – Allan Mar 28 '18 at 7:40
  • @Allan is it not normal to be negative when running on battery? – theonlygusti Mar 28 '18 at 7:48
  • That wouldn't make sense. What's the value plugged in? – Allan Mar 28 '18 at 7:55
3

Since it's easy to do, the first things I'd try are to reset both the NVRAM and SMC in that order. Before following the steps below, ensure you have no external hardware connected (so, unplug any external displays, storage devices, etc) and make sure you use the built-in keyboard.

Reset the NVRAM

Here’s how to reset the NVRAM on your particular MBP:

  1. Shut down your machine. Yes, a full shut down, not just logging out.
  2. Press the power button and then press the commandoptionpr keys. You have to make sure you press these keys before the gray screen appears or it won’t work.
  3. Hold those keys down until your Mac reboots again and you here the startup chime.
  4. Let go of the keys and let your Mac reboot normally.

Note: When you log back in you may need to readjust some of your system preferences (e.g. speaker volume, screen resolution, startup disk selection, time zone information, etc).

Reset the SMC

To reset the SMC on your particular MBP, follow these steps:

  1. Shut down your computer
  2. Keep the power cable plugged in.
  3. Press at the same time shiftoptioncontrol (on the left side of the keyboard) and the power button
  4. Let go
  5. Turn your computer back on with the power button.

After resetting both the NVRAM and SMC, use your computer to determine if the issue still persists.

  • It didn't seem to change anything. Guess I just need my battery replaced? – theonlygusti Mar 28 '18 at 15:15
0

If you're on a new 2017 or 2018 MBP and your battery is dying quickly, it may be Google Chrome. Chrome forces high performance GPU mode regardless of being on battery/AC. As soon as you shut off Chrome you'll see your battery extend back to 8-10 hours.

Source: https://mkn.us/blog/brand-new-macbook-pro-battery-dying-quickly/

  • 1
    I actually only use Safari – theonlygusti Aug 7 '18 at 23:08

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