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Yesterday I was out of home and I receive a message on iPhone forcing me to change my iCloud account details. I changes everything to new passwords, keep the 2 factor enabled and sign out in every device automatically after this change.

Today I turned on my macbook and saw this:

Screenshot after turn on my mac

I tried cmd R and this is what appears. I tried every password, code from two factor and nothing..

I tried cmd R and this is what appears. I tried every password, code from two factor and nothing...

It seems that someone hacked my account. I go over iPhone and checked that for my Macbook the only option available is to reproduce sound (and it works).

Do you know how to solve this situation?

inserir a descrição da imagem aqui

  • This looks troublesome. Do you still remember the message you've got on the iPhone initially? Any chance that this already has been a scam and you actually handed over your iCloud credentials to a phishing site? – nohillside Oct 8 '17 at 18:04
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    How did you change your icloud password after you received the message? Did you click on a link in the message or did you manually go to icloud.com to change your password? If it was the former, then i guess you fell into a phishing trap. – dunni Oct 8 '17 at 21:31
  • FYI: Here's a new email address that is being used: apple.passcode@post.com – Heather Foster Oct 13 '17 at 0:16
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It appears that someone did get ahold of your iCloud account and locked your Mac using Find My iPhone. Usually, you will receive an email if an unknown device logs into your iCloud account, so I would check there to see if any suspicious login attempts were made.

Unfortunately, the only way to unlock your Mac is to know the password that was used to lock it on Find My iPhone. For now, I suggest that you change your iCloud password. You can take your Mac to a local Apple store or Apple Authorized Service Provider, who may be able to unlock your Mac.

My guess is that Apple.pass@post.com is run by some sort of scam service. Looking online, it seems that other people have encountered this attack, and have been asked to pay a ransom to get access to their Mac. I still suggest you take your device to an Apple store and explain your situation before paying the owners of this account.

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