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Yesterday I found a Twentieth Anniversary Mac in my Nonna's basement. Apparently it's been there since 2002. I was very curious about this and I Googled it and found that it was a special edition.

On the rear and side are some ports I'm not familiar with. I wonder if anyone can explain them?

The rear has 6 ports and I don't know what ports 3, 4, and 5 are for? There's also a large port on the left hand side that I'm not familiar with.

Can anyone help?

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Wow, that's a find!

Actually, there are more than six ports on the rear, there's also a cover you can open to reveal a whole heap of other ports (e.g. Serial ports, ADB port, etc).

However, to explain the ports in your question:

  • Port 3 is a SCSI port
  • Port 4 is a TV Tuner port
  • Port 5 is a FM radio port
  • the port on the left side you refer to is a PCI slot (Note there's actually a comm slot above this as well).

Below are some images I've taken from the Twentieth Anniversary Mac Service Source:

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IMPORTANT NOTE

This model actually has a switch to select the appropriate voltage for your country (see below), so make sure you have the correct voltage selected for your location.

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If your location is not listed, then select whichever is appropriate (e.g. if you're in Australia then select 230v).

[EDIT]

Finally, as per IconDaemon's comment below, you can access the service documentation directly for yourself.

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    Mac Service Source document (from which the illustrations above were sourced) can be found at this link. Easily found on the Googles. – IconDaemon Jun 6 '17 at 13:34
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    @IconDaemon Nice find! You can even access service manuals for a whole heap of other laptops too! - But I'm guessing you already knew that! I'll update my answer to include a direct link to the Twentieth Anniversary Mac doc. Thanks for the heads up! :) – Monomeeth Jun 6 '17 at 21:43

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