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I have macOSSierra 10.12.5, I have checked the keyboard shortcuts in system preferences and Cmd ⌘ ` (command + backtick) is enabled indeed!
Yet, when I open two finder windows (not the tabs), I cannot cycle between them. I explicitly have to right click on the finder icon in the doc and select one of the open folders. This is bad, really bad for productivity, since I have to switch every time between mouse and keyboard.

Is there a way out of this ?

Thanks

  • Are they in the same Space? It only works if they are. Also, what Language is the keyboard & your input language? See apple.stackexchange.com/questions/193937/… for language variations. – Tetsujin Jun 6 '17 at 6:23
  • @Tetsujin, the keyboard is of type en-US. I am quite not sure what space means here, can you please elaborate? I Just open the finder in the current window from two different locations in terminal by typing : " open . " – user1707873 Jun 6 '17 at 7:13
  • Explanation of Spaces - support.apple.com/HT204100 – Tetsujin Jun 6 '17 at 7:18
  • Also, double-check that the Finder Window menu shows the correct key command – Tetsujin Jun 6 '17 at 7:25
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Besides checking on System Preferences / Keyboard / Shortcuts that the shortcut is indeed active and enabled, check also on the "Window" menu on a Finder window. There should be the shortcut. In this case Command + `".

Screenshot

As you've been suggested as well, check that your PHYSICAL keyboard has this key and doesn't require a modifier (like SHIFT) to be used. If you're using a foreign keyboard set, like a spanish or azerty keyboard, for example, you need to find out what the right key is.

Another idea would be to go to System Preferences / Keyboard / Input Sources and enable "Show input in menubar". You'll get a new menubar icon, from which you can select "Show Keyboard Viewer". In this tiny keyboard you can see where your keys are mapped. Maybe (just maybe) your tick (`) key is not where you think it is. This viewer should help you.

Screenshot

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