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I am getting kernel panics on reboots for a few weeks now. They seem to be caused by an Oracle kernel extensions(I will add an image of the stacktrace). I am using a MacBook Pro 15" retina mid 2014 model with MacOS Sierra.

I assumed that it was caused by VirtualBox, however I uninstalled it and removed the kext with their script and I ran in a kernel panic once again. I scanned my SSD with the Disk Utility tool and it showed no errors. Reinstalling MacOS helps temporarily until I restart again.

I appreciate your help.

Attempt to clean up photo

enter image description here

original here for ref

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  • The oracle kext is still there...
    – Tetsujin
    Jun 2 '17 at 10:02
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    At the very top of your kernel panic is the message "page fault" which points to a memory issue. I would at minimum run Apple Hardware Test (AHT). Hold the D key while booting from a powered off state with the AC adapter connected. Also, try removing 1 of the SO-DIMMs and see if the problem goes away. If not, swap SO-DIMMs and slots to see if there's any change.
    – Allan
    Jun 2 '17 at 10:35
  • The apple hardware test did not show any errors. Also, I won't be able to remove the SO-DIMMs since they are fixed on the motherboard on mac version 11.3. Jun 2 '17 at 11:42
  • @Tetsujin I have searched in /Library/Extensions and /System/Library/Extension for this specific Oracle kext however I can't find it there... Jun 2 '17 at 11:44
  • @Allan - not that I'm any kind of expert on the inner workings of memory - but isn't a page fault usually just a memory call that needed to be called from pagefile - or does that no longer apply once we're in panic & at that point it must be an actual invalid condition which cannot be handled, an address that simply doesn't exist?
    – Tetsujin
    Jun 2 '17 at 12:27
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I fixed the Kernel Panic by formatting my hard drive and reinstalling my OS.

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