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A recent blog post about Apple's technology curve (Apple's 2016 in Review) had this statement:

...with this version of the Mac Pro, Apple took what was a solid developer machine and turned it into an appliance, one users couldn’t upgrade components on their own.

The author seems to be implying that current Mac Pros cannot be modified or upgraded, but in previous years or in older models that was possible. What is the change that occurred here?

  • 1
    We can't know what the author was referring to, probably best to ask him directly. – nohillside Jan 4 '17 at 18:13
  • @patrix Given that the question has already received a more or less correct and objective answer, your allegation that it is opinion-based is, I think, extremely premature. The existing answer identifies the models and identifies which items are upgradable by the average user. That is NOT an opinion. – Stale Handle Jan 4 '17 at 18:47
  • I've changed your question slightly to remove the part which asked for an opinion. – nohillside Jan 4 '17 at 18:57
4

A Mac Pro is not a MacBook

Old Mac Pro [5,1]
with the side removed, which is the only way to really tell the old ones apart in a picture

Components upgradable

  1. by an average user

    • RAM
    • Graphics Card
    • Drives - DVD/HD/SSD [maximum 6 standard size drives, more with SATA SSD or PCI SSD]
    • hardware RAID card
  2. by a pro/enthusiast

    • CPUs
    • Bluetooth/WiFI card

enter image description here


New Mac Pro [6,1]

Components upgradable

  1. by an average user

    • RAM
  2. by a pro/enthusiast

    • CPU

enter image description here

See Apple KB: How to identify Mac Pro models

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