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I know that using a higher amperage charger will make a device charge faster.  But is there a limit to how high the current can be?  Could too high a current damage the battery?.  Could I use a 24watt (5v/4.1A) USB charger (intended to charge USB-C devices such as my Nexus 5x) to charge an iPhone?.  I'd use a USB-A to USB-C cable for connection.

marked as duplicate by fsb, Timothy Mueller-Harder, Allan, IconDaemon, Jaime Santa Cruz Dec 28 '16 at 19:38

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The 6/6S can take advantage of up to 1.6 amps if the USB adapter can supply it. Using a higher capacity adapter will not hurt the phone, but won't help either. An iPad adapter is 2.2 amps, the iPhone "cube" is 1 amp. So an iPad adapter will charge an iPhone 6 or 6S series slightly faster. Not true for the 5 and earlier, which will only use 1 amp regardless of what is available.

  • Very useful info. Good to know that the iPhone 5 won't take more than 1A. Now I don't need to test what I intended to: start up a 6plus with the battery connector removed using a 12w charger, it won't!, (even the 6s reboots constantly during startup), the 6plus remained dead and read 0.005 or so in an ammeter, but I suspected this was due to a fault in this iPhone. Not sure if any other iPhone will. Thanks! – Antonio MS Dec 28 '16 at 21:45
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It will not "hurt" your iPhone, however with long term use and everyday charging with the larger amperage, you will damage your battery faster and it will start performing worse more quickly than it would normally.

I recommend charging your iPhone with the standard 1 amp charger that is included with your iPhone. However, if you're in a pinch and need some extra battery fast, then using a larger amp charger won't destroy your iPhone.

The iPhone does not need 2.1 amps forced inside it, but it will handle it.

People claim the iPhone is designed to handle more than 1 amp of power, such as the iPad's 2.1 amp brick. Just because there is a cutoff at the amount the iPhone will accept, (not sure what it is just over 2.1 amp I believe) doesn't mean shoving more than 1 amp of power inside it won't damage the internals. The power management chip and battery has to work with more power. (more heat, more wear) Also, using more than 1 amp will increase the temperature of the iPhone overall which is not good for a lot of parts of the phone.(glue, plastic)

Yes, Apple lists that the iPad charger is compatible with your iPhone. It does work, and won't cause noticeable harm for a while. Also, worst case scenario for Apple is you go and drop more money on a battery replacement. More heat and more power is never a good thing, and will cause long term damage and poor battery performance, with the possibility of other things failing faster. I have seen it first hand with my customers before. (I own a small business fixing iPhones) Things such as glue and plastic can loosen up and move. Screens sometimes will get small bubbles under them, screens will sometimes loosen up and require new glue to re secure them into their proper place. The customers that had those issues claimed they regularly charge with an iPad brick.

Source

  • Have any sources to back up your claim that using a higher amperage charger will actually destroy the battery faster? IMHO, that's not totally true, but if you post a source... – owlswipe Dec 28 '16 at 15:19
  • Sure thing! People claim the iPhone is designed to handle more than 1 amp of power, such as the iPad's 2.1 amp brick. Just because there is a cutoff at the amount the iPhone will accept, (not sure what it is just over 2.1 amp I believe) doesn't mean shoving more than 1 amp of power inside it won't damage the internals. The power management chip and battery has to work with more power. (more heat, more wear) Also, using more than 1 amp will increase the temperature of the iPhone overall which is not good for a lot of parts of the phone.(glue, plastic) tinyurl.com/z5n9nxp – Dan Hergenreder Dec 28 '16 at 15:30
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    Great answer, this is the type of answers I love. Dan seems right, even Apple admits using over 1 amp (1.6 A is the maximum accepted current according to te above answer) will damage the battery and the generated heat, if used a lot, may do some harm. I sometimes receive iPhone 6s with the battery worn out or failed even though they're younger than 2 years. – Antonio MS Dec 28 '16 at 22:26

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