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I'm having a heck of a time trying to understand all of the latest specs on monitors. I've nursed an old 2009 Cinema display for years and it finally crashed.

I have a MBP Retina 15" mid-2015 and this is the monitor I'm looking at:

http://www.lg.com/us/monitors/lg-27UD68-W-4k-uhd-led-monitor

There seems to be so much involved in the refresh rate, HDMI vs display port vs _______.

Just hoping someone can tell me if this monitor will run at its fullest potential with my laptop.

Thank you!

  • Questions specifically about monitors are discouraged since the likelihood that another visitor to this site will need an answer to your specific question is exceedingly low. – owlswipe Nov 29 '16 at 4:48
  • @owlswipe Where is this stated? I'm genuinely curious, because it was searching for similar issues that led me here to begin with. And, it takes two. A monitor by itself is pointless. My concern was compatibility with my MBP and the confusion surrounding "4k" created a lot of noise. – user1447679 Nov 29 '16 at 6:28
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Short answer

Yes this monitor will work on your MBP. However, whether it will run it at its "fullest potential" will depend on your specific model. If your MBP has the Radeon R9 M370X graphics card installed (your question doesn't say) then yes it'll take full advantage of this monitor.

Long answer

Your MBP supports an HDMI-compatible device, including 4K, while using one Thunderbolt display or can support two Thunderbolt displays not in 4k.

In terms of resolution your MBP supports up to 3840x2160 pixels at 30Hz or 4096x2160 pixels at 24Hz (HDMI).

If your MBP has the Radeon R9 M370X graphics card installed then it'll support up to 5120x2880 at 60Hz via Thunderbolt.

The LG display your looking at has both HDMI and Display Port inputs and provides up to 3840x2160 resolution at 60hz.

So, if you do have the Radeon R9 M370X graphics card installed this will be a good choice of display. If you don't, then it'll work but may not be the best choice depending on your needs.

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