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I own a late-2013 Retina MBP 13" running latest El-Capitan OS X version.

Currently I feel it's so polluted with crappy files and apps. What I wanna do is:

  • Backup my personal files
  • Backup my important apps and their state (settings, files, ...)
  • Factory reset (I don't if this term is used for MacBooks) my MacBook.
  • Upgrade to macOS Sierra
  • Bring back my important apps and their settings back.

I know there are ways to backup the whole session. And I know I may find a way to manually backup each app. What I'm looking for is an app that does the backup for a single app automatically.

  • What are you trying to say by, Factory reset (I don't if this term is used for MacBooks) my MacBook.? – user3439894 Oct 26 '16 at 23:36
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    @user3439894 I'm pretty sure reaffer means to wipe the internal drive and do a fresh macOS install – NoahL Oct 27 '16 at 0:51
  • I'd suggest manually moving all of your files and apps to an external drive and essentially creating your own backup. You will have to move everything back and forth manually, but it will give you the ultimate amount of control of what you keep – NoahL Oct 27 '16 at 1:08
  • @reaffer Unfortunately, according to my research, to back up each application individually including the settings is impossible at the moment(without doing each individually, but even then it would be almost impossible, because applications store their data differently). – abc Oct 27 '16 at 23:25
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If you are giving away your mac at the momment and not keeping it, follow this method here.

Backing up your Mac and your files:

You can use the native app called Time Machine(already installed on every mac, no matter what) to back up every single thing on your Mac to a disk you choose(can be to an external hard drive or usb) and restore to that backup when you update or you can exclude certain files to not backup in Time Machine, but backup everything else. To figure out how, click here.

Note:

I would recommend updating to macOS Sierra first before doing the following steps, but it is fine to upgrade after.

"Factory resetting your Mac"

Make sure everything has been backed properly. Go into the apple menu and click on restart. This next text has been copied and pasted from this article here.

"During the restart process, before moving onto the login screen, your computer will show a gray slate screen. This is your opportunity to go behind the scenes: Hold down both the Command key and the R key when you see gray. This should pop you over to the MacOS Utilities, where you can make various important and potentially dangerous changes. Select Disk Utility from the window. Now, this process is going to be a little different based on what version of MacOS you are using, but you will want to look for your startup disk or other startup-related information. Select it and then click on the Erase tab. Next, head over to the Format option and set it to Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Again select Erase. This may take some time. Once finished, go to the Disk Utility menu and select Quit Disk Utility."

You should be at a screen similar to this(depends on your mac version):enter image description here For this next step you must have your Mac connected to the internet otherwise it won't work. You need an internet connection for this step because this is where your Mac pulls a new copy of macOS from Apple's servers.

"Once you have quit out of Disk Utility, you should see an option to Reinstall your current MacOS. Select that reinstall option, confirm that you really want to do it, and proceed. You may have to click through a few confirmations before the installation is ready to begin."

After this, your Mac is as good as new. If you haven't already updated to macOS Sierra, set up your Mac as if it was new, then update.

  • You answered a big part of the question nicely. But what about backing up particular applications (and their settings) instead of the entire Mac backup? – reaffer Oct 27 '16 at 20:01
  • @reaffer unfortunately, according to my research, to back up each application individually including the settings is impossible at the moment(without doing each individually, but even then it would be almost impossible, because applications store their data differently). – abc Oct 27 '16 at 23:22

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