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My network is amazing slow, and my question is what can I do about it.

I have done the following analysis:

Transfer from MacBookPro -> Router -> Mac Mini Intel Core 1 264,3 MB = 2114, MBit in 432 seconds. == 4,89 MBPS

Transfer from MacBookPro -> Mac Mini Intel Core 1 (Direct network) 264,3 MB = 2114, MBit in 295 seconds. == 7,16 MBPS

Transfer from MacBookPro -> Router -> MacBook Air 90,2 MB = 721,6 MBit in 147 seconds. == 4,90 MBPS

All connections via WLAN: 54 MBit/s, WPA2, WMM, autochannel. Router is a FRITZ!Box WLAN 3170

So, the router sucks a bit performance, thats OK. Anyway as the router shows me that all clients are connected with 54 MBit/s, shouldn't the transfer time less? What can I do/check to increase my networks speed?

Christian

  • The single most effective speed boost you can get is to buy a modern router. I get 11 megabytes/second from my MacBook Pro to my Time Capsule disk. – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 25 '12 at 10:01
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Looks closer to 802.11b than 802.11g, the speed advertised for wireless networks is confusingly not equivalent to an Ethernet cable of equivalent speed.

This guide will be informative for you:

http://www.smallnetbuilder.com/wireless/wireless-basics/31083-smallnetbuilders-wireless-faq-the-essentials

Basically buy an Apple Airport Extreme to replace your current system, and try to use the 5Ghz frequencies instead of 2.4Ghz as you are probably suffering from a lot of interference.

Example setting up with existing router:

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  • Do you know if Apple Airport Extreme can operate with an existing router (which includes the dsl modem)? I would like to avoid to buy another hardware component (the dsl modem) – Christian Aug 26 '11 at 12:24
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    Yes, details here. – Steve-o Aug 26 '11 at 13:16
  • Set the Airport to bridge your current router. This mean you only have one network and one dhcp-server – Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen Aug 25 '12 at 10:03
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One thing you can do is to make sure that your wireless router is using a channel that doesn't overlap with the channels of the other wireless networks around you. The frequencies of adjacent channels (e.g., 2 and 3) overlap, which can result in interference. Lifehacker has some good tips for picking a channel here.

  • I could double my speed with another channel. No it is 9 MBPS - not perfect, but better. Thanks! – Christian Aug 26 '11 at 18:34

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