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I've recently had my MacBook Pro 15" model late 2011 repaired, it was a graphics card problem, they changed it and now it's working.

The problem that I've encountered now is that it is overheating a lot, compared to how it used to be. I used to have temperatures of about 30-40 °C 2000 rpm (ambient temperature of 20-30 °C) using integrated graphics and a workload of CPU of about 5% max (internet browsing, and stuff like that).

And after being repaired, in the same ambient and work condition I have 60-70 °C! I don't know what they could have done to my macbook in order to have this temperatures.

I first made an SMC and PRAM reset just in case, but no things changed. Then I reinstalled OS X El Capitan, but again nothing changed. So I thought that they could have incorrectly applied the thermal paste (or it was a bad quality one) so I reapplied some of my EVGA Frostbite thermal paste, and I've finally noticed some change. The temperature (again in same work and ambient conditions) is of about 40-50 °C 2000 rpm. But it is again far from what it used to be.

Long story short (UPDATED):

  • MB Pro late 2011 got graphics card broken, and repaired by certified apple repair center
  • I used to have temperatures of about 30-40 °C, 2000rpm
  • Now it is of about 60-70 °C, 2000 rpm
  • OS X El Capitan reinstalled and PRAM, SMC reset done
  • AHT made and no problem found

What can I do in order to solve this problem. I want to have my old macbook temperatures!


UPDATE: I've performed a SMC, because I've done it before the new installation of OS X. And for my surprise, the temperature values that were displaying were wrong. Now after SMC I've got the exact same range as before changing the thermal paste :/

  • PS: or no PS: - the responsibility is with whoever repaired it; presumably they missed a sensor, or knocked/misaligned something. – Tetsujin Dec 13 '15 at 18:15
  • @Tetsujin What do you mean by "missed a sensor"? As told in description, I've opened the macbook to change the thermal paste so I got sure that nothing was misaligned. I don't know how the refrigeration system works inside the MB, but the only thing I could think of is that if there is gas inside the "radiator" (the tube that is over the CPU and GPU) they could have punctured it and the gas escaped. Just assuming, I don't know. – Fjallbacka Dec 13 '15 at 18:37
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I'm unable to answer / resolve the OP query, but I wanted to share my similar experience. I've had a very similar experience in that I had a MBP 2011 15" GPU failure about 18mths ago, which resulted in the Main Logic Board (MLB) being replaced earlier this year. Since then I upgraded the OS to El Capitan - and the MBP heated up faster and hotter than it did prior to the GPU failure, and the fans didn't audibly start up as much or as loudly as they did before the GPU failure/ MLB replacement. The OP's temperature stats & data were similar enough to mine to not warrant posting my own (plus i can't remember that level of detail! I then began experiencing similar GPU related symptoms (lines across the the screen etc) and I took the MBP to my local Apple Store, who replaced the MLB immediatley... since then I havent experienced the same high temperatures, however I still can't hear the fans kick-in when it does get hot...or somehow the new MLB replacement has somehow qietened the fans (although I can't see how this is actually possible). I've reported this to Apple Support, however there isnt a resoltion... arguably as there isn't a problem as such. I'm probably being over-concerned.

AS such, I would recomend you contact Apple Support and get it booked into a Genius Bar asap alongwith a set of actions that can be carried out at the bar to replicate the high temperatures. Good luck!

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