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I've found a random certificate in my keychain after upgrading to El Capitan‎ on both my Macs. It's called "ENTIDAD PUBLICA EMPRESARIAL RED.ES". It's showing a warning that it was signed by an unknown authority.

Does anyone know what this is used for?

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You may check the validity of the certificate including the certificate chain here:

DigiCert® SSL Installation Diagnostics Tool

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or here:

Check your web servers encryption

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Both checks show the same chain with different results though:

The certificate ENTIDAD PUBLICA EMPRESARIAL RED.ES as well as the intermediate certificate AC Componentes Informáticos seem to be ok. SSL-Tools and OS X El Capitan can't properly detect the validity of the root certificate though.

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Red.es seems to be a Spanish telecommunications provider. They say they're "responsible for the .es TLD:

Dominos ".es" is responsible for managing the Internet Domain Names Registry for the country code ".es". The registry management tasks include processing applications and assigning new domains.

It is a part of the public business entity Red.es.

ICANN seems to agree. It looks like they sell their own SSL certificates for domains, and so they'd need a root certificate on your computer - otherwise, your browser would complain.

If you don't visit .es websites often, I'd be inclined to disable that certificate. It's one more company that, if infiltrated, their root certificate could* be used to impersonate any website. Like, say... this one.


*I'm not entirely sure about that last one, I'm not an expert on certificate chains. It's possible that this root CA is only valid for *.es domains. Not sure.

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