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I upgraded to OS X El Capitan via a clean install. While erasing the disk, I renamed it from Macintosh HD to Hard Drive. After installation, I copied all data from an external hard drive back into its original location. I checked if everything was working, including if all images, faces, locations, etc. showed up in Aperture. Nothing seemed amiss.

Only now, days later when trying to edit a few older images did I notice that at the top of the Adjustments tab of the inspector it said Image Offline for every single file in my library.

I immediately tried Show in Finder on some random image which returned

The file 'filename'.jpg could not be found because the volume on which it resides is currently offline.

Volume: Macintosh HD

I did a grep search for Macintosh HD within the Aperture library database (Aperture Library.aplibrary) using grep -nr "Macintosh HD" . to see if the problem was fixable by replacing Macintosh HD with Hard Drive in a couple of places. It searched for a few seconds before turning up two or three matches. A few seconds more, and it went into a frenzy, basically spitting out the path to every single image in my library.

After that, I dropped everything and fled here so as not to damage anything further. Any ideas on how to fix this without doing another clean install to change the volume name back to its original? Help will be greatly appreciated.

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    You can change the volume name easily enough from the finder, just click it twice [not double-click] just like you would with a file; or click then Return. I often have issues if I clone a drive for experimenting with OS upgrades etc. Everything just behaves better if I name the clone the same as the main drive & remove that drive. – Tetsujin Oct 15 '15 at 20:02
  • I can hardly believe the fix was so simple, but indeed, that did the trick. Thanks a lot. If you post this as an answer, I'll accept it. – Casimir Oct 15 '15 at 20:09
  • Just out of curiosity, could you think of a way to fix this without changing the drive's name back to its original? – Casimir Oct 15 '15 at 20:11
  • Sorry, no - it would need a better set of nix chops than I posses. That's always been my 'fix' for it because it's always only been a temporary setup, so I never researched a good fix. I'd wait to see if someone does have a better long-term solution, but I'll drop mine in as an answer - just give it a day or two before marking it "the correct" one, just in case. – Tetsujin Oct 15 '15 at 20:14
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    @Tetsujin Sadly, no better answer yet. I'll accept yours now. Thanks again for your help. – Casimir Oct 21 '15 at 7:48
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I'm sure this could have a better solution, from someone with a deeper understanding of the OS underpinnings, however...

You don't need to start over to simply change the volume name, you can change it easily enough from the Finder, just click it twice [not double-click] just like you would with a file; or click then Return.

I often have issues if I clone a drive for experimenting with OS upgrades etc.

Everything just behaves better if I name the clone the same as the main drive & remove that original drive.

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