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I'm trying to upgrade a MacBook from mid-2009 (it's the A1342, MacBook 6,1) with a new hard disk. The original one was a 250GB and the new one I'm trying to install has 500GB and it's a Toshiba.
I've already created an Apple partition map in the new disk and formatted it to Mac OS Extended (Journaled), but the Mac always shows me the folder icon blinking with the question mark.

I've tried booting from the original Install DVD and from the Snow Leopard DVD, with the option key and "C", but none of them seems to work. It doesn't show anything, not even the boot options. When I try the old disk it boots just fine.

Do you have any idea what I'm doing wrong?

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To be able to create a bootable volume for Intel Macs you have to use the GUID partition scheme while partitioning a disk in Disk Utility. Apple Partition Table (APT) is for older non-Intel Macs or non-bootable disks in both worlds. The disk size is restricted to 2 TB though.

If no boot option works (C or alt/option) either your optical drive is broken (or dusted etc.) or the DVDs got corrupted.

Then re-attach the 250 GB disk and an additional thumb drive, download an OS X installer app of your choice and create a bootable OS X installer thumb drive.

Put the 500 GB disk back into your MacBook again and boot from the thumb drive.

  • Thanks klanomath. I thought that the GUID partition scheme was only for Intel based machines. I'm going to try it later today. – Hivvu Oct 1 '15 at 9:32
  • @Hivvu But your MacBook6,1 is a Intel based Mac... – klanomath Oct 1 '15 at 9:35
  • That's wasd my mistake! I will give it a try and come back to tell how it went. – Hivvu Oct 1 '15 at 11:42
  • I only managed to test it now and even with the GUID partition it doesn't boot. Always shows the folder icon with the question mark... Can it be something with the keyboard? the C key don't show anything... – Hivvu Oct 2 '15 at 21:32
  • @Hivvu Did you try alt/option-c or alt or c? That's unclear in your question. The proper command to boot from CD/DVD is just c or alt and choose a start volume. – klanomath Oct 3 '15 at 13:17

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