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I'm on an iMac 2.7GHz i5, 16Gb RAM 1600MHz, mountain lion. I use regularly licenced CS6, especially photoshop, illustrator and acrobat pro.

I'd like to upgrade to mavericks, but frankly, on the web there are too much rumors that this or that won't work then... I use my imac to work, I'm a freelance web developer, so I cannot have problems on my machine. It must work.

So, is there any DEFINITE answer to this issue? Apart to definitely stop using adobe products (I'll do it..).

thank you!

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    Install mavericks on a separate bootable partition and make sure everything you need works right. You should always do that before upgrading a work machine anyway. – Tom Gewecke Feb 14 '14 at 14:31
  • Interesting, but I'm not such a ninja :P I do not have any partition in my main HD. Anyway, I think it's a good suggestion, thank you – Luca Reghellin Feb 14 '14 at 18:46
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    I'd recommend that you get a separate drive and make at least two partitions on it. One for testing software updates, one for keeping a bootable backup of your current system. Not having the latter when you make your living with your machine is a formula for disaster, I have seen many people hurt badly by failing to do this. The software (Superduper) is free. – Tom Gewecke Feb 14 '14 at 20:33
  • @Rob, I can't, because I cannot be sure it really works: the web is full of people claiming it doesn't work ad quoting Adobe's notes doesn't per-se give us any real thing to be sure: I don't trust Adobe at all, that's exactly why I tried to ask here. – Luca Reghellin Mar 22 '14 at 14:32
  • @stratboy you know installing won't replace cs5? – Rob Mar 22 '14 at 14:52
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Yes CS6 works, and also please check out these notes by Adobe, about compatibility for Mavericks.

I've got a CS6 myself and do not see anything going wrong with it. And since Adobe claims to be fully compatible with the products you name in your question you should be fine too.

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