2 Added steps for resetting NVRAM.
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Normally when a problem is not occurring when booted into Safe Mode, but occurs when booting normally, it's time to investigate login items, fonts, and kernel extensions.

Based on what you've already tried, your scenario seems a little different to this, so I'd try creating a new additional Admin account to see if you can log into this normally.

Create an additional Admin account

You can do this by tricking your MBP into thinking it's being set up as new:

  1. Boot into Single User Mode by restarting your Mac and pressing and holding + S as soon as you hear the startup chime
  2. Keep these keys down until you see a black screen with white text
  3. Mount your drive by typing in /sbin/mount -uw / and then pressing the enter key
  4. Remove the Apple Setup Done file by typing in rm /var/db/.AppleSetupDone and then pressing the enter key
  5. Now reboot your MBP by typing in reboot and then pressing the enter key
  6. Follow the prompts to complete the setup process and create a new admin account

Once you've done the above, try starting up and logging in as the new admin user and let me know what happens.

Reset the NVRAM

Older Macs had what's called Parameter RAM (PRAM), newer Macs use Non-Volatile Random-Access Memory (NVRAM). It may be worth you also resetting this. Here’s how to do this on your particular MacBook Pro model:

  1. Shut down your machine. Yes, a full shut down, not just logging out.
  2. Press the power button and then press the commandoptionpr keys. You have to make sure you press these keys before the gray screen appears or it won’t work.
  3. Hold those keys down until your Mac reboots again (i.e. a 2nd time) and you here the startup chime.
  4. Let go of the keys and let your Mac reboot normally.

Let me know what happens.

Normally when a problem is not occurring when booted into Safe Mode, but occurs when booting normally, it's time to investigate login items, fonts, and kernel extensions.

Based on what you've already tried, your scenario seems a little different to this, so I'd try creating a new additional Admin account to see if you can log into this normally.

Create an additional Admin account

You can do this by tricking your MBP into thinking it's being set up as new:

  1. Boot into Single User Mode by restarting your Mac and pressing and holding + S as soon as you hear the startup chime
  2. Keep these keys down until you see a black screen with white text
  3. Mount your drive by typing in /sbin/mount -uw / and then pressing the enter key
  4. Remove the Apple Setup Done file by typing in rm /var/db/.AppleSetupDone and then pressing the enter key
  5. Now reboot your MBP by typing in reboot and then pressing the enter key
  6. Follow the prompts to complete the setup process and create a new admin account

Once you've done the above, try starting up and logging in as the new admin user and let me know what happens.

Normally when a problem is not occurring when booted into Safe Mode, but occurs when booting normally, it's time to investigate login items, fonts, and kernel extensions.

Based on what you've already tried, your scenario seems a little different to this, so I'd try creating a new additional Admin account to see if you can log into this normally.

Create an additional Admin account

You can do this by tricking your MBP into thinking it's being set up as new:

  1. Boot into Single User Mode by restarting your Mac and pressing and holding + S as soon as you hear the startup chime
  2. Keep these keys down until you see a black screen with white text
  3. Mount your drive by typing in /sbin/mount -uw / and then pressing the enter key
  4. Remove the Apple Setup Done file by typing in rm /var/db/.AppleSetupDone and then pressing the enter key
  5. Now reboot your MBP by typing in reboot and then pressing the enter key
  6. Follow the prompts to complete the setup process and create a new admin account

Once you've done the above, try starting up and logging in as the new admin user and let me know what happens.

Reset the NVRAM

Older Macs had what's called Parameter RAM (PRAM), newer Macs use Non-Volatile Random-Access Memory (NVRAM). It may be worth you also resetting this. Here’s how to do this on your particular MacBook Pro model:

  1. Shut down your machine. Yes, a full shut down, not just logging out.
  2. Press the power button and then press the commandoptionpr keys. You have to make sure you press these keys before the gray screen appears or it won’t work.
  3. Hold those keys down until your Mac reboots again (i.e. a 2nd time) and you here the startup chime.
  4. Let go of the keys and let your Mac reboot normally.

Let me know what happens.

1
source | link

Normally when a problem is not occurring when booted into Safe Mode, but occurs when booting normally, it's time to investigate login items, fonts, and kernel extensions.

Based on what you've already tried, your scenario seems a little different to this, so I'd try creating a new additional Admin account to see if you can log into this normally.

Create an additional Admin account

You can do this by tricking your MBP into thinking it's being set up as new:

  1. Boot into Single User Mode by restarting your Mac and pressing and holding + S as soon as you hear the startup chime
  2. Keep these keys down until you see a black screen with white text
  3. Mount your drive by typing in /sbin/mount -uw / and then pressing the enter key
  4. Remove the Apple Setup Done file by typing in rm /var/db/.AppleSetupDone and then pressing the enter key
  5. Now reboot your MBP by typing in reboot and then pressing the enter key
  6. Follow the prompts to complete the setup process and create a new admin account

Once you've done the above, try starting up and logging in as the new admin user and let me know what happens.