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comment Deleted 20GB using 'rm -rf <dir>' and 'df -k' has not changed (but 'du -k' is correct)
Local snapshots are a useful feature, and you shouldn't disable them unless they're causing an actual problem. The fact that deleting files doesn't immediately free up disk space may be confusing, but as long as you understand what's going on (and realize that the space will automatically be released if/when it's needed for new files), this shouldn't be considered a problem.
Jul
1
answered Can I upgrade to Yosemite without a credit card?
Jun
29
revised Airtight User Account on Macbook Pro
Added notes on Find My Mac and the third immutable law of security
Jun
29
answered Airtight User Account on Macbook Pro
Jun
28
answered What is the “rootless” feature in El Capitan, really?
Jun
25
comment OS X cd command in /usr/bin instead of /bin
Also, this answer has an interesting historical note about cd as a builtin vs. separate program.
Jun
25
comment OS X cd command in /usr/bin instead of /bin
@ggrim: I wouldn't say "stored inside" so much as "is part of". I believe it's actually implemented as a function included in the bash source code. BTW, it's not just bash -- every shell shell (zsh, dash, etc) has to have cd as a builtin, or it'd fail for the reason I gave. You might be interested in this previous question on the Unix&Linux SE.
Jun
25
answered OS X cd command in /usr/bin instead of /bin
Jun
14
answered Can someone explain what 'diskutil cs revert' does?
Jun
13
comment Will updating my MacBook Pro to OSX Yosemite delete/ruin my current files on desktop
+1 for the backup recommendation. As a rule, if you have files you don't want to lose, you should have a backup. This is true when upgrading because sometimes things go wrong during upgrades, but it's true at all other times as well, because upgrades aren't the only time things can go wrong.
Jun
8
awarded  Guru
Jun
7
comment Snow Leopard *private* folder?
You can view the (normally hidden) /private folder in any version of OS X in the Finder by choosing Go menu -> Go To Folder (shortcut: Command-Shift-G), then entering "/private" in the dialog that appears.
Jun
3
comment Create PKG file from DMG
That doesn't really make sense; both formats are ways of distributing files & folders, but an installer package also includes information about where those files & folders should be installed -- something a disk image just doesn't have. Can you explain what you're trying to do in more detail?
May
24
comment Making a full image of an installed system
I would not recommend this approach; if the target volume is smaller than the source, you wind up with unusable space; if the target is smaller, it won't restore properly. Also, the image will include all blank space (and fragmented files, etc) from the source. I'd strongly recommend using the Apple tools (see @Redarm's comment) or DeployStudio instead.
May
17
comment SQLite frontend for OS X?
The project has moved to GitHub -- the new link is https://github.com/sqlitebrowser/sqlitebrowser.
May
15
answered Install Mac OS X Tiger alongside Mac OS X Snow Leopard?
May
6
comment OS X Yosemite Server won't create websites
It's a bug in the current version of Server.app (v4.1). Hopefully to be fixed in the next update...
May
2
comment How do I copy a Mac volume using cp?
I'd skip --compress (it's only useful for network transfers), and add -E (preserve extended attributes and resource forks).
May
2
comment How do I copy a Mac volume using cp?
Please don't try to use dd in this situation. It won't work right if the source and destination volumes (/devices) aren't exactly the same size, and may fail interestingly if the source volume is mounted for write access, and even in the situations where it works it tends to be horribly slow on OS X (using the /dev/rdisk entry instead of /dev/disk helps somewhat, but it still doesn't know better than to copy all of the unused space on the disk). asr and rsync (with appropriate options) are much better options.
Apr
26
comment Determine when OS X was installed?
@Tetsujin if it had 10.6 installed on it (or any of the other versions that included something with that package ID), it should have a record of that. I'm not sure why that wouldn't be found. I've edited the question with a way to find the oldest package records on the system; see what that shows.