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 Tumbleweed
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Jan
10
comment Cannot open Terminal on mac (“Not allowed to use” error message)
Yeah…there might be some spyware buried deep in the system where you'll never quite be able to get rid of it. Nuke the thing from orbit.
Nov
30
comment I just overwrote my folder while mounting a hard disk drive. How do I undo/recover it?
Reboot, really? Why not just unmount?
Nov
23
comment How do I change the password on a Time Machine backup image?
In lieu of an answer, I've decided to simply start a new backup image and abandon this one. I've run hdiutil erasekeys on the old sparsebundle, followed by shred on all of its metadata files: that should be enough to prevent any data from being recovered even if the password is discovered later.
Oct
27
comment How to start OS X applications from the command line with optional arguments?
Leaving my downvote because this post still doesn't answer the question. (It would be a better fit for this question, but a similar answer has already been posted there.)
Oct
27
comment Terminal command that gives the type of computer you're on
@Mark No, Scot should edit that information into the answer. The edit would add meaning, rather than just clarifying.
Oct
27
comment How to start OS X applications from the command line with optional arguments?
-1. This will open a file with the given app, but it cannot be used to pass arbitrary arguments.
Oct
27
comment Terminal command that gives the type of computer you're on
This'll give you one of Apple's machine-readable strings, same as in System Information -> Hardware -> Overview -> Model Identifier. If you want to reliably distinguish between desktops and laptops, you'll need to maintain a current and exhaustive list of Apple's model-ID prefixes (PowerBook, MacBook, MacBookAir, MacBookPro vs. PowerMac, iMac, Macmini, MacPro).
Sep
24
awarded  Tumbleweed
Sep
18
comment Why can't I paste into the password dialog when mounting an encrypted disk image?
I would strongly recommend that people use hdiutil as jaberg answered instead of resorting to UI automations such as this one.
Sep
17
asked How do I change the password on a Time Machine backup image?
Apr
12
comment How do I get rid of this power assertion from a dead process?
@Buscar웃 I don't think so. (kextstat | grep -i av didn't turn anything up.)
Apr
12
comment How do I get rid of this power assertion from a dead process?
@Buscar웃 No. Take a closer look at my question—I ask how to get rid of the assertion short of logging out or rebooting.
Apr
12
comment How do I get rid of this power assertion from a dead process?
@Buscar웃 Doesn't seem to have helped—the ghost assertion is still there. As for the MAGICWAKE line, that sounds like a wake-from-sleep-on-LAN thing (especially because of the owner=en1 bit).
Apr
12
asked How do I get rid of this power assertion from a dead process?
Apr
12
comment Is the iPhone 6 more powerful than a 1980s era Cray supercomputer?
An iPhone 6 would indeed look awesome (surprising, at least) sitting in the middle of a dedicated computing center.
Nov
16
comment How do I make OS X require my password immediately after the display is put to sleep?
An example of a log line that explicitly states that a file is being written, as in your answer, would be Nov 15 18:16:53 rainbow-dash WindowServer[78]: dumping current state to disk
Nov
16
comment How do I make OS X require my password immediately after the display is put to sleep?
Yes, my logs have similar lines in them. I said that I see nothing that explicitly says that a file is being written. device_generate_desktop_screenshot() as a function name sounds to me like the system is copying the image currently used as wallpaper, and possibly adding some effects (dimming, blurring?) or something, and then saving it in memory for later use (i.e. to show behind the password prompt later). Without official documentation, we can't say for sure what that does (or even if the name does indeed refer to a function!)
Nov
15
comment How do I make OS X require my password immediately after the display is put to sleep?
I see nothing in your log that explicitly says writing file or locking, only things that look like function|method names and memory addresses. I still don't understand why it can't simply require a password immediately after the user asks for the system to be locked. It seems trivial to me to set a flag that means we're locked now; require a password to unlock, and then do the file writing afterward.
Nov
15
revised How do I make OS X require my password immediately after the display is put to sleep?
amended question to say what I meant
Nov
15
comment How do I make OS X require my password immediately after the display is put to sleep?
Why does this prevent the system from immediately prompting for a password, though? If I catch it while it's writing this file out, shouldn't it just stop writing the file (or finish—doesn't matter, really) in the background and…throw up a password prompt? I guess I just don't see how this is relevant!