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comment What is the “rootless” feature in El Capitan, really?
thanks @bmike sounds good to me! :-)
1d
revised Netboot Image - Where is the user generated data stored
deleted 1 character in body
1d
comment What is the “rootless” feature in El Capitan, really?
Now that I realize this is off-topic I have voted to close my own question; I will flag for reopening when El Capitan is released.
Jun
28
comment What is the “rootless” feature in El Capitan, really?
...Also this totally makes me want to write a kext or something to allow myself to create a binary which I can run in the command line to return to unrestricted access!
Jun
28
accepted What is the “rootless” feature in El Capitan, really?
Jun
28
comment What is the “rootless” feature in El Capitan, really?
Nice, thanks. I asked this question because I was about to link to that quora article on another Stack Exchange question and then realized that was not the correct move ;-)
Jun
27
comment Is it 'OK' to use the root user as a normal user?
@CousinCocaineas I understand it El Capitan will still have a root account, it just means authentication for apps will work differently... but let's find out for sure
Jun
27
asked What is the “rootless” feature in El Capitan, really?
Jun
8
awarded  Popular Question
May
5
awarded  Famous Question
Apr
5
comment View desktop of *very remote* Ubuntu box from my MacBook Pro
And if you're already running a VNC server on your mac (Screen Sharing for example), you can use a different local post with: ssh -L 5901:localhost:5900 username@remote_ip and then use vnc://localhost:5901. The 5901 port can be any unused port between 1024-65535 (or from 1-65535 if you're root)
Apr
5
comment Temporarily disabling RAM to mimic a lower spec machine?
If you're talking about enterprise grade virtualization like VMWare ESXi, then you're right @phyrfox -- about CPU speed. There is a performance hit on graphics and video processing which will be noticeable if running Mac OS X. I agree, Virtualization is the right solution when you want to adjust CPU frequency, available cores, hardware, etc. But this question was purely about limiting available RAM, and for that use case I believe that virtualization isn't the right solution.
Apr
4
comment Temporarily disabling RAM to mimic a lower spec machine?
If you're writing to a file, of=/Volumes/RAM\ Disk/random.dat, then you should be fine. if you're writing to the disk, of=/dev/rdisk9, then you have to be root, and it may have to be unmounted. (it should be unmounted, otherwise the system will get confused)
Apr
4
comment Temporarily disabling RAM to mimic a lower spec machine?
But the question was, "Is there some way to temporarily disable RAM without physically removing the chip?", so this does not answer the question
Apr
4
comment Temporarily disabling RAM to mimic a lower spec machine?
-1, sorry... this is not a good comparison. Now, you have virtualized video drivers, virtualized I/O, and a small CPU performance hit. I love Virtualization, but if all you want to do is see how the system would perform with less RAM available this is not a good solution.
Apr
4
comment Temporarily disabling RAM to mimic a lower spec machine?
You can probably just dump all the calculations of the disk size and let dd fill up the whole disk: dd if=/dev/random of=/Volumes/RAM\ Disk/random.dat bs=1024k
Feb
28
awarded  Notable Question
Feb
13
awarded  Notable Question
Jan
31
comment What would happen if I force installed a Linux driver into Mac OS X?
Also, there is a modprobe equivilent in OS X: kextload
Jan
19
answered Am I being monitored?