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4

Its a good idea to reformat the machine, because who knows what all was ran on it, and whether that may cause problems for you later or more so now. So its a very good idea starting off from a clean slate you will know what is installed, since you installed it. In fact I would never use a re-purposed machine without formatting it first. Its a secuity risk ...


3

So there are a few components to this, which I'll tackle in chunks. The most important is how to execute a remote command/script. As IconDaemon points out, SSH is the best use for this. There's even a pretty good and secure means of doing this without requiring a password, for automated scripting purposes. For clairity's sake, I'm going to refer to the ...


3

According to this source, you will not be able to use a Thunderbolt cable in this fashion. You can, however, get a Mini DisplayPort to Mini DisplayPort cable from Monoprice for about $5 and that should work just fine.


2

I use a combination of synergy for my laptop (macbook pro), and workstation (ubuntu linux). To get to my servers (some freebsd, some linux) I use just SSH, but if I need an X session I can export it over ssh. As Lyken mentions, ARD is the way to go. VNC is more crossplatform, but since you're running all Macs, its a piece of piss to get working. Synergy ...


2

Yes and no. It's certainly possible to create clusters out of disparate machines and use them in some co-ordinated fashion. But it's the realm of specialty software and specialty application programming. Beowulf can take separate machines and have them act as one, large SMP machine with shared memory and all but programs need to be Beowulf compatible for ...


2

I see it's an old question but for the sake of Google, here is my answer. On the Mac, you can create an alias in ~/.bashrc like so: alias ssh='ssh-o "XAuthLocation=/opt/X11/bin/xauth"' If you also share the .bashrc across both OS X and other unixy machines, you could add a little stanza to the .bashrc as follows: if [ `uname` == 'Darwin' ]; then ...


2

You can even just install the OS onto an external drive and set things up cleanly. If you find you need to boot back to the old configuration, it's just a short interruption. Plan on 15 to 20 minutes for the install. The configuration depends more on your familiarity - I'd spend 30-90 minutes on the first attempt and see where you get in that time. Doing ...


2

Well, XServes are servers after all, designed to provide user services 24/7/365. I bet that there are some services (web serving, mail, iChat, etc,) turned on by default that you must first turn off before the Xserve can sleep. If you didn't setup these Xserves yourself, (or even if you did,) this Snow Leopard Server Getting Started manual may help you to ...


2

I just found the answer to this. From the Trouble shooting manual: As the LED flashed but did not alternate between flashing and off, I didn't have an alarm condition. Just pressing the light solved the issue. I'd have deleted the question, but thought the solution (even if trivial) might save someone else down the line some trouble.


1

Extracted from the Xserve User Guide: System identifier button and light: The yellow system identifier light flashes if a problem is detected. You can also turn it on or off manually by pressing the button, or turn it on remotely using Server Monitor. This indicator is useful for locating a particular unit in a rack with more than one Xserve. A second ...


1

You'll have to delve into the mysterious world of SSH (Secure SHell). I once needed to have a FirstClass mail server execute a script on a remote backup server to start a daily backup process. A script on the FirstClass server first paused its mirrored mail-store disk, did some sanity checking to make sure the pause actually occurred, (backing up the live ...


1

There's a free app called Please Sleep. This works well on my iMac when something is keeping it from sleeping. It waits for the Energy Saver time limit then forces the system to sleep, even if iTunes is running or a video is playing or whatever. You can configure what applications it acknowledges and ignores when determining whether to force sleep or not. ...


1

The main thing to tackle is booting up the xServes. Luckily, Intel xServes (which yours should be if they're running 10.6) have Lights-out-Management (LOM) that should support this sort of thing (all Macs support Wake-on-LAN, but that only works on a local network). Apple Remote Desktop (ARD) has support for this. It looks like you'll need to forward a few ...


1

Actually, it looks like this may work, as noted here Share your Magic Mouse between 2 Macs. This should be able to be extended to where both the keyboard and the mouse are Bluetooth and replacing the KVM with a USB switch. For the setup we used the following hardware: 1 mac mini (running 24/7 as a home server) 1 Mac Pro (it’s a hackintosh ...


1

This may be third-hand information, from this page of specs, but: Apple reports that this Xserve supports "any combination of SATA or SAS Apple Drive Modules: up to 2.25 TB using three 750 GB 7200 RPM SATA drive modules; or up to 900 GB using three 300 GB 15,000 RPM SAS drive modules."


1

The original G4 Xserve was prone to structural 'sagging' after spending a while in a rack. I'm not aware of any specific fix for this problem, which causes random kernel panics / shut-downs / other weirdness; later model XServes were not affected (not sure when exactly, but I've never seen this on any intel xserves, while I did see it on a significant number ...



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