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1

Shutdown cause numbers are different from Error Codes. For example, a shutdown cause of 0 means that your Mac lost power. An error code of 0 means that (the function) exited normally with no error. Using this case as an example, *Error code -128" means user canceled, while shutdown cause -128 is undefined. So, in the output you provided, you have 3 error ...


-1

The combination of the model, video viewing(/discrete gpu usage) and the way it just respawned to the login screen makes me fairly certain it's a faulty GPU issue. Luckily there's a warranty extension repair program running until the end of the year, see http://www.apple.com/support/macbookpro-videoissues/ Check /Library/Logs/DiagnosticReports for ....


0

Hold home and lock buttons for at least thirty seconds. Then try connecting it to a computer and seeing if it's recognized. If it ran out of charge, the battery plug-in symbol might not show because it is so dead.


1

Run a sysdisgnose. That is how Apple receives feedback from seeding/beta customers. The keyboard shortcut is Cmd Opt Ctrl Shift Period. You can also run sudo sysdiagnose -f ~/Desktop/ in Terminal. The former will save to /var/tmp and the latter will save to the Desktop. Sysdiagnose will contain pretty much A to Z. You should be sure to check the disks....


5

Clients that connect to known networks automatically will advertise “hidden” SSIDs in all of their probe requests. This results in your device broadcasting those SSIDs everywhere you go, to anyone who’s listening. This behavior is dependent on the client’s operating system. For instance, you can configure Windows 7 and later to not connect to hidden ...


-1

Preface I think what Apple's message on your screenshot wanted to say is that hiding networks' SSID won't allow them to hid anything except that. So basically they're telling you hiding networks isn't safer it just doesn't broadcast the SSID. I agree with you the message can be very tricky to interpret, but I see this as the only reasonable way to read ...


0

For others finding this thread because they too have the problem: On my wife's MacBook Pro, the answer turned out to be that the laptop could not differentiate between the 2.4GHz and 5GHz version of the wireless, and if it connected to a different one than last time, told her the password was wrong. The cure was to 'split' the two wi-fi networks by adding '-...


0

For others finding this thread because they too have the problem: On my wife's MacBook Pro, the answer turned out to be that the laptop could not differentiate between the 2.4GHz and 5GHz version of the wireless, and if it connected to a different one previously, OS X told her the password was wrong. The cure was to 'split' the two wi-fi networks by ...


1

Yes, that is correct; it will change. Your MAC (Media Access Control) address is assigned to network interfaces, not to the computer. For example, on this WiFi adapter from a Macbook Pro, you can see the MAC address imprinted on the chip (circled in red) You can even lookup the manufacturer of the WiFi adapter by entering the first six characters into a ...


2

Get an app on the App Store which will tell you the MAC address of the AP you're connected to. There are many, and they are free. Then, enable the WiFi scanner in the AirPort Utility app: go to Settings > AirPort Utility to enable it. The scanner will tell you the MAC addresses of the detected APs and the frequencies used. Since APs use different MACs for ...


1

Your devices (iPad, iPod) are not disconnecting from the first AP and connecting to the extender AP because the signal is still too good for it to disconnect from. One of the best ways I have found to create a much more reliable wireless infrastructure is to turn down the transmission power of the WAP. In basic terms, this lowers the distance that a good ...


0

My mav wasnt able to recognize and wifi networks. The fix is easy. Hold power until late it powers off. Turn it on and when the apple appears on the screen hols shift. It will reboot your computer. Once the computer turns back on you'll be able to see the WiFi networks in range.


0

This is possible, as shown here: https://discussions.apple.com/thread/6448960?start=0&tstart=0 As the link describes, use a static IP in the wifi network but only fill in the IP and Subnet Mask fields. Edit: this is also answered here: http://apple.stackexchange.com/a/174722/120252


0

I have a similar issue; it happens from time to another that we lose the internet connection in my office. We are still connected to the server by ethernet so what I do is to share my mobile data connection. I need the connection to the server for file access so I only need to set the wifi to be on top of the list, no need to unplug the ethernet cable. ...


2

Seems to me the answer would be to turn on Do Not Disturb. This keeps internet on but prevents notifications from appearing while the screen is locked, but when you go to the lock screen they'll appear there, and you'll get notifications while using the phone. If you want to be able to get phone calls while in Do Not Disturb, this can be modified in ...


1

As others have said, not automatically on an un-jail broken iPhone. If you really want to turn off wifi and cell, you can swipe up from the bottom of the screen and select airplane mode before locking. But turning off wifi and cell will also prevent incoming calls and messages! If it is just the notifications bothering you, go to Settings, Notifications ...


5

Unfortunately there's no such feature in the current version of iOS (9.3), but there are some tricks you can still do now to achieve almost what you're asking for. On iOS 9 In this version of the Apple's OS you can keep open the settings app in the background, keeping it open in the Cellular Data section so you can easily open the app and turn Off or On ...


0

Yes. Though info on the topic seems somewhat sparse, a few threads like this and this seem to indicate that using a hotspot works as a viable Wi-Fi network for AirPlay (as long as, of course, you connect both the iPhone and the computer to the hotspot.) However, if you've already got a Wi-Fi network, you'd probably be better off using that instead of a ...


0

It is not possible to do this with Apples MGM tools.


1

You're probably way over this, by now, but I just set up log capture from my 5th gen Airport Extreme to my Mac Mini (running Mavericks), so I'll chime in for posterity. Syslog Destination Address does expect an IP address. The computer at the end of that ip address has to be configured to be a log server (and OSX can be configured for this... see below). I'...


0

I think you're trying to set up port forwarding, to allow yourself to ssh in from outside, and changing the port to keep it slightly more secure? You don't need to change the port used internally (inside your network) - you just need to change the port used from outside of your network. Then, set up a rule that passes connections on the desired port to the ...


-1

This worked in linux terminal: sudo iwlist wlan0 scan


1

Use the following command in a Terminal (/Applications/Utilities): system_profiler SPAirPortDataType You can also see this information via the GUI app System Information. System Information > Network > Wi-Fi Just type System Information in Spotlight.


1

I've just had the very same problem (OS X El Capitan) and refreshing the Finder didn't work out for me. Neither turning off and then back on the WiFi. What worked for me was restarting the router.


-3

Your Airport card should default to the fastest protocol it is capable of.


1

Yes. It's now quite easy to do so using Quicktime. Connect both phones to the computer using a USB -> Lightning cable. Open QuickTime Player. Choose File -> New Movie Recording twice. Choose a given phone to mirror for each of the windows. Move the windows around as you see fit!


1

The short answer is YES it is capable. I have a Macbook Pro 13" Retina Late 2013 model running El Capitan. I am running a Dual Band Router 2.4 and 5.0 by ASUS. The difference of my setup is that I gave the 2.4 and 5.0 different names so they appear separately in my wifi list. I have it set to access the 5.0 first and if for some reason it is not available ...


0

Chances are, it's your WiFi router. I was having the exact same issue with 2 Macs (iMac 27 Late 2012 and a 2009 MBP) as well as a Microsoft Surface Pro 3. I had both 2.4GHz and 5GHz networks and would get random, but continual dropouts that would lose Internet connectivity. I disabled each network individually, first the 5GHz , then the 2.4GHz. Running ...


-1

take a backup of the router config file and use nirsoft tools to view the config file in order to get the password in text format.



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