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67

From the Apple Support database article regarding network connection priority: If you connect to the Internet or a network in several different ways (using Wi-Fi or Ethernet, for example), you can change the order of the network port configurations your computer tries when connecting to the Internet or network. If there are multiple active ...


59

For keeping the connection alive, you can check in /etc/ssh_config the line where it says ServerAliveInterval, that tells you how often (in seconds) your computer is gonna send a null packet to keep the connection alive. If you have a 0 in there that indicates that your computer is not trying to keep the connection alive (it is disabled), otherwise it tells ...


45

It's in your Network Preferences. Here's screen shots from 10.7.3. Access the settings from the gear at the bottom of the network type sidebar. Choose "Set Service Order..." to drag them into the preferred order.


40

Do the following: Find out what the network interface is for your wifi. Mine is "en1" for this example (I have obfuscated my MAC addresses with "00") ifconfig en1: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500 ether 00:00:00:00:00:00 inet6 0000::000:0000:0000:0000%en1 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x5 inet 10.0.1.16 netmask 0xffffff00 ...


27

When you're connected to the Wi-Fi network, hold down option and click the Wi-Fi icon in the OS X menubar. You'll see additional details about your connection, including one item labelled PHY Mode:. That will show you whether you're connected via 802.11ac, n, g, etc. There's also a Channel: entry that tells you the radio frequency and channel.


26

Sure. Just go to System Preferences/Network, select Wifi and click Advanced. A list with all the Wifi networks you've been connected to will appear. Just rearrange the connection order (the ones you'd like to connect first on top) by drag-dropping. Also, delete any unwanted network SSID (network names) if you no longer want to auto-join that.


26

1) If you have a Mac connected to the same network, you can find the stored password in it's Keychain using the Keychain Access app 2) If the router is an Apple Airport based device, you may be able to log straight into it via Airport Utility (available on Mac and iOS) to see the password at source 3) If you are on iOS7, then you can use iCloud Keychain ...


22

I had this problem connecting to the local public library system network. The problem seems to be a result of my having specified DNS servers ((i.e. OpenDNS, Google, etc.)) in my Network preferences. The solution was to create a network location called "No DNS" which doesn't have any DNS servers defined and use that network location when I need to log into ...


21

Just found this Disable Captive Network Support in OS X Which mentions "To disable it, set this preference:" sudo defaults write /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/com.apple.captive.control Active -boolean false In case, you would ever want to remove this setting, you can do: sudo defaults delete ...


18

You can rename /System/Library/CoreServices/Captive Network Assistant.app into /System/Library/CoreServices/No More Captive Network Assistant.app and you're all set. Password entering now goes via your browser of choice and can be stored using 1password or other plugins. Note that if you were already logged in while doing the renaming, it may take ...


18

If your Mac enters its full sleep state, then your network connections will be disconnected. Your Mac can not be connected to a WiFi network and be asleep at the same time. You can avoid full sleep by setting your Computer Sleep to Never. Your MacBook will then sleep all the sub-systems possible when idle, but will remain awake enough to maintain a WiFi ...


18

Try to Option+click on the wifi icon on the menu bar. You'll see a lot more information about your current wifi connection. It looks something lijke this:


17

You have to be jailbroken. If you are, check out Wifi Passwords on Cydia.


17

This really has nothing to do with unibody or Macs, but is rather due to physics. I'm guessing that you're cooking using a microwave oven or have it running nearby when you're using your laptop. The 802.11b WLANs operate in the 2.4 GHz band. Unfortunately, microwave signals also fall in the same frequency band, and hence can cause interference with your ...


17

ifconfig gives information about all interfaces, including WLAN. The WLAN interface is usually en1. $ ifconfig en1 en1: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500 ether 20:c9:d0:97:22:e9 inet6 fe80::22c9:d0ff:fe97:22e9%en1 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x5 inet 192.168.1.137 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast ...


16

You can change the system preferences for JoinMode and JoinModeFallback to be the following: JoinMode (String) Automatic Preferred Ranked Recent Strongest JoinModeFallback (String) Prompt JoinOpen KeepLooking DoNothing Do this using the airport command: ...


16

Unfortunately, on the iPhone it is not possible to access this information. The passwords are kept on your phone in a safe place that is not accessible through any regular means on the phone. This is done for your protection, if you were to lose your iPhone and someone picked it up, the passwords that are stored on it would be up for grabs. This would ...


16

You can multi-select & delete from System Prefs > Network > WiFI > Advanced… Shift ⇧ or Cmd ⌘ Click to select multiples, then hit the — button underneath. Note that this will also clear the same settings from any linked iDevice.


15

If you're just looking for a quick signal strength number, option-click on the AirPort icon in the menu bar. Under the connected network you will see several pieces of information: RSSI is your signal strengh in dB. Higher (closer to 0) is better. If you're looking for noise or the signal strength for multiple access points, I suggest checking out ...


15

Remove it from the list of "Preferred Networks" and it will stop auto-connecting. Go to "System Preferences" > "Networks" prefpane. Choose "AirPort" (or "WiFi" on Lion) on the left. Click the "Advanced" button. In the resulting sheet, choose the "AirPort" (or "WiFi") tab. (It should be the leftmost.) Select your neighbor's wifi network in the list and hit ...


15

Bluetooth and IEEE 802.11/b/g/n (WIFI) use almost the same frequency bands: Bluetooth: 2.402 - 2.480 GHz (79 channels) WIFI 2.4 GHz (IEEE 802.11/b/g/n): 2.4 – 2.4835 GHz (11, 13 or 14 channels depending on the country) Usually Bluetooth uses frequency hopping and changes the possible 79 x 1 MHz bands 1600 times a second to avoid disturbances while WIFI ...


14

This is a topic I have followed online and in "real life" for several months. Anecdotally, Apple seems to have a wifi problem with the 2012 MacBookAir. I have no firm figures concerning how widespread this situation is, but I know of two other MacBook Air laptops that have displayed this issue: the MBA I purchased in hopes that I could use it attached to ...


14

I'm pretty sure this is not possible to do on vanilla iOS, perhaps with a jailbreak. However, your solution of running two separate WiFi networks is generally not what you want. It is much more common to extend one WiFi network (i.e. a single SSID) with multiple routers. Devices should then automatically switch to the access point with the stronger signal. ...


14

Yes. Your phone will be polling periodically for available networks, which will use battery. Even you set it to not ask to join networks, the radio is powered up and that takes some amount of power to do.


13

You should define a STATIC address for the WiFi/LAN. (define an correct netmask, and dont enter any router/gateway address ). (see the static tab in the @Michiel's screenshot.) When you done, you can access the computers on WiFi network and you will access the rest of the Internet via 3G. This is what you looking for?


13

Hold down the option key when you click on the WiFi menu. Then next to the currently active network there will be a "Disconnect from" option. I'm on Yosemite, and so I'm not sure whether this was present on earlier versions of OS X.


13

AirDrop uses Bluetooth to create a peer-to-peer Wi-Fi network between the devices. Each device creates a firewall around the connection and files are sent encrypted, which actually makes it safer than transferring via email. AirDrop will automatically detect nearby supported devices, and the devices only need to be close enough to establish a good Wi-Fi ...


13

In short: you can not force a frequency band in OS X 10.9 Mavericks. (On 10.5 you can...) You want to connect to the device using Basic service set identification (BSSID) instead of regular Service set identification (SSID). Connecting to a BBSID will connect you to a specific device regardless of the connection strength. Connecting to SSID will connect you ...


12

Open Keychain Access from /Applications/Utilities and search for AirPort. All the network passwords are listed as 'AirPort network password' entries. Double-click an entry, then select Show Password and enter your login password to view it.



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