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Here is a step-by-step guide for you: Temporarily disable any Firewall/Internet Security solution/packet filter on your Mac (like LittleSnitch/Hands Off!/Kaspersky Internet Security etc.) Connect to the administrative interface of your router with a working Mac. Make a note of the internal interface (probably 192.168.0.1 in your case) If your router uses ...


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With airdrop it is always a direct connection (usually wifi or a mix of wifi + bluetooth) between the 2 devices. No internet connection is required at all. So you can transfer as much as you like and it will all be local between the devices; "peer to peer" like you say. Your internet quota won't be used at all.


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You can not bridge from WiFi to WiFi. You'll have to connect to the internet via a different port if you want to share the connection. I'm assuming the reason you don't connect to the network directly with your iPhone is some kind of client limit. You could use a Wireless Router to connect to the WiFi and repeat and reroute it. If you use an Apple Airport ...


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Your issue is being caused by OS X's handling of a wi-fi parameter commonly referred to as roaming threshold. This parameter dictates the point at which an OS will switch to a stronger signal. Windows gives easy access to this parameter, example here, but no simple option exists in OS X. This document from NYU suggests OS X has "aggressive" roaming ...


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iOS decides automatically whether 2.4 GHz or 5 GHz connection is best if an access point supports both. You can change your BT Home Hub settings to broadcast two separate access points. Open the hub settings → Advanced Settings → Wireless → 5 GHz Wireless and disable “Sync with 2.4 GHz”.              This allows you to specifically connect to two separate ...


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After inspecting your configuration, it seems two factors might be in play here: DNS Firewall A quick way to confirm a working internet connection but bad DNS is going to a website by using it's IP address rather than it's domain name. For example: http://91.198.174.192 which is a WikiMedia Foundation address. It should say something like "unconfigured ...


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You can have the same SSID for multiple APs, this is how our campus network is set up, but there is a caveat that's worth knowing. When moving between APs we've noticed OS X has a tendency to "stick" to the first AP it has joined even if it's in the presence of another AP offering a stronger signal. Cycling the wi-fi can help with re-association to an AP ...


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Without special software or hardware to do so, multiple connections are not combined for increased throughput, knowing as bonding. The connections are utilized in the order shown in System Preferences > Network (screenshot below). You can change the order by clicking the gear icon > Set Service Order. There is no harm in letting the computer connect to the ...


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It seems like you are pretty up on WiFi, so I won't go into all the inner workings. However, you did mention that the "handover takes ages." The handover is handled by both the device AND a controller. There is a setting (and generally not accessible by users) at what threshold the adapter begins looking for another good network. It is taking ages ...


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Solution that avoids having to restart the computer: Go to terminal and type sudo ifconfig en0 down And enter your password. This will cause the WIFI card to restart and (for me) the connection to be restored.


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The diagram at the top of the article you linked to in the question seems to show exactly what you are trying to achieve; the extended base stations are connected via Ethernet, from their WAN ports, to a network port on the primary base station. Have you tried this configuration?


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Firstly ask your parents to turn on your iPad and connect it to the local network. If you have remote administration on your router you'll be able to do the next steps yourself, else you'll need your parents to do it. Login to your router's administration page Get the external IP address of your router (if you can set up dynDNS this will make your life ...


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When flashing custom firmware, you need to be very careful. Some firmwares can cause hardware-software communication issues, so when you think a setting has been changed, it may not have been. DO NOT send it in for repair. You've probably already voided the warranty. Try to go back to your original firmware and see if it works. Any communication errors ...


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Some users have reported similar problems with 10.10.2 Looking true you attempts, I would suggest following additional steps. Reset WiFi settings: Turn Off Wi-Fi from the Wireless menu item From the OS X Finder, hit Command+Shift+G and Copy/Paste the following path: /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/ Select following files: ...


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Is it at all possible that the campus network does not broadcast it's SSID? Try this, go into Settings -> Wi-Fi and tap on "Other..." Type in the name of the campus WiFi network and its password. Will that allow you to connect?


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Please understand following. You can not receive and transmit from same device (unless is it equipped that way). You Mac is not capable to do that, it is either or. If you for example receive Internet via cable to your Mac then you can share (transmit) it using your Mac WiFi. So the input and output can not be the same. Since you are receiving WiFi, ...


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This is quite a workaround to go through and unfortunately involves paying for a software (unless you're aware of free alternatives) but thought I'd throw it out there while looking for more details: Using a program like Keyboard Maestro, you can record a Macro that will be the result of a string/hotkey. I recorded as follows: Hit record Pressed and ...


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Yes, I do believe you can include some or all of that functionality. Look at GoodReader's features, for example. It does wifi transfers, and it will connect to network shares. Some supported protocols include FTP, SFTP, SMB, AFP, etc. IIRC, I used a copy of it on my iPhone and a copy on my iPad to transfer files. Good luck!


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Wi-Fi has multiple channels, which specify what frequency the network is communicating on. On the 2.4GHz frequency, channels 1, 6, and 11 are non-overlapping channels, and all the others overlap on these channels. (On the 5GHz frequency, the channels are spaced out to avoid overlapping). You can think of channels as an offset value from 2.4GHz. Current ...


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When you were at the office, did you use a different network like a AT&T/Verizon/Sprint hotspot? Next time, try testing at a Starbucks or another public wifi first. More than likely the VPN server dosen't allow loop backs (meaning you are in the network to start, go out, to come back in). It probably just connected you. What VPN (server) are you ...



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