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8

Apple (or a 3rd party) should write a utility to allow you to dial down the native resolution of the internal camera, but to my knowledge they have not, so far. You can work around this by piping the video output from your web camera into another program that processes the camera's video stream and "re-publishes" it to your Mac as a virtual camera (aka ...


6

Delicious Monster makes an awesome piece of software called Delicious Library that's intended to do exactly what you're after: scan and catalog your library (of books and other things). And it all works through your iMacs built-in iSight camera. And it works very, very well. From their website: “Wait, I just hold a CD or DVD or video game or book or ...


4

Delicious Library wasn’t made just for scanning a list and dumping it out, but it could be used for such a thing. After scanning in your items you’d either want to slurp the results using a custom AppleScript or you can use our export-to-CSV feature and only do the ISBN column. If a book doesn’t look up on Amazon there’s an error window that pops up, and ...


4

There are Mac applications that can do this, although I don't believe that any of them run on Flash. Here's some that I found: Wirecast from Telestream BoinxTV from Boinx Software CamCamX from Black-Op They're all commercial, but there's a wide range of pricing between the three.


4

There is an Adobe Air application you can download called QR Reader - works on any platform that has Air installed, and a bunch of online services you could try too - QRGen looks pretty neat - you upload an image of the QR code and then it processes it for you. Hope that helps.


4

The simple answer is no - in general the one camera only sends data to one app. The more complicated answer is that the API (application programming interface) that Apple publishes enforces this restriction. If a developer hooks into the hardware directly or there is a bug in the API, it is possible to share that stream. So for most Apps made by someone ...


4

Apple don't provide any way to control camera devices centrally, it is left up the program in use to provide the ability to choose. Generally, well written programs give you a choice, and poorly written (and, generally, poorly supported) programs don't. (Photobooth, I'm looking at you.) The only way I know to force a program to not use a camera is a hack ...


4

What about c-slide? (http://www.c-slide.com) 1 mm thin and works with all latops and pad devices. The cool thing is that you can open and close it without having to remove any parts from you laptop. And it's sleek, the only downside is that it is black and might not look very nice on a white MacBook frame.


4

This research paper reported by the Washington Post and Ars Technica says yes. Though it was only tested on "old" Macs (Late PPC, early Intel)


4

The port is used to "set up Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP), Real-Time Control Protocol (RTCP)" according to Apple. According to wiki, "the Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) defines a standardized packet format for delivering audio and video over IP networks. RTP is used extensively in communication and entertainment systems that involve streaming ...


3

According to this Apple discussion forum post: As you know, software always controls your iSight. Most apps, including all Apple apps of which I am aware, automatically make the iSight settings for you and do NOT allow you to manipulate them from within the application. In my own case, I have found that merely adding more light to my work ...


2

I just read another article about that on Ars Technica Yes the LED is hardwired But it can still be bypassed Only downside of this article, it was only tested on "old" (late PPC, early Intel) macs.


2

Today I stumbled across a proper publication regarding this topic: Researches from the Johns Hopkins University recently published the paper "iSeeYou: Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED", showing that they were able to deactivate the iSight status LED on older MacBooks even without root access by replacing its firmware. It appears they were able to ...


2

Sure, there are lots of applications that allow you to remotely view a feed from any camera connected to a Mac, including the built-in camera: EvoCam, RemoteSight, SecuritySpy, or if you're handy with command-line tools, iSightCapture. Most of these products stream the feed from the camera to a web server, which you can then view on your iPhone or work ...


2

Try the free Skitch (also available from the Mac App Store). One of the many things it can do is a Cam Snapshot. To take one, invoke Skitch, then choose Capture > Cam Snapshot. You may need to fiddle a bit with the size of the snapshot to get full resolution. This worked to the max resolution of the iSight on my older MacBook Pro; it's worth a try on the ...


2

Kinda roundabout, but you could try this: Open Quicktime. Choose File -> New Movie Recording. On the little down arrow to the right of the record button, choose maximum quality. Also drag the record button holder to least obtrusive location. Command-3 to fit to screen. Take screen shots with command-shift-(3 or 4).


2

Using the iPad camera connector with the USB port seems to work with certain items (headsets, etc.) that aren't cameras, leading me to believe that there is a full USB hardware implementation in there but there simply aren't any drivers. If this is true, you could get a USB Ethernet dongle, write iPad drivers for it in your camera-viewing app, and use ...


2

If System Profilier isn't showing it up under USB then the iSight has been physically damaged beyond repair (not accepting power) or has been somehow disconnected from the Bus. System Profiler always displays connected devices, even if they're corrupted or non-functioning. Take your Mac to the Apple Store and they will tell you what it will take to fix it. ...


2

There was once a project called iPhoneCam which allowed you to stream your iPhone video over WiFi to your Mac, but it seems like this project never got released. However, there is an app called Peephole ($0,99) which, according to their support pages, will do the following: Peephole for the iPhone is a unique iPhone application that lets you use your ...


2

I'm not aware of any software that will allow you to do that. I would comment on the KeyLemon suggestion, but I don't have enough rep! I do not think this will replace the standard OS X login screen. It looks like it will add another, working like a screensaver, to restrict access to your machine once you have logged on.


2

With the help of Growl's documentation about AppleScript support and a little discussion with Bart Arondson and Elliot B in the comments onto the question I've come up with the following AppleScript. I've saved this script as an application agent which you can add to your login items in System Preferences → Users & Groups → Login Items. ...


2

"iSeeYou: Disabling the MacBook Webcam Indicator LED" is a paper by Matthew Brocker and Stephen Checkoway from the Johns Hopkins University. In this paper they explain on how to disable the LED when using the camera. In short: normally you use the CPU to access the camera and activate the LED, but you can also use the processing unit in on the camera board ...


2

It's possible you have installed, or someone else has installed, a system utility to capture the image from the iSight when opened. This is often something an anti-theft application might do, in order to track down the user of a stolen laptop. One combination of utilities that can do this sort of thing is "sleepwatcher" (http://www.bernhard-baehr.de/) and ...


1

I've seen problems like this before with Skype and I'm pretty sure there's nothing you can do about it. Make sure you're not running any other apps that are using the camera and that you've got the latest version of Skype installed. I've found that sometimes going into the Skype preferences and clicking on the "Audio/Video" icon can "free" it up.


1

You can easily change which device is used for audio input. Just hold down ⌥ Option while clicking on the Volume menu item: Alternatively, to get a bit more fine control, open System Preferences (found under  > System Preferences…) and open the Sound preference pane:


1

How about imagesnap. If it's simple you want, then that's a free (with source) command line tool with the following options: USAGE: ./imagesnap [options] [filename] Version: 0.2.4 Captures an image from a video device and saves it in a file. If no device is specified, the system default will be used. If no filename is specfied, snapshot.jpg will be used. ...


1

System Information (formerly known as System Profiler) will show you some information about the built-in camera (which Apple calls the iSight), but I don't see frame rate, exposure time, or shutter speed mentioned here. In my specific case, the manufacturer is listed as Apple, and they likely don't want to publish this information. Apple treats the built-in ...


1

Even with a CD drive available, I would recommend first checking the manufacturer's website for the latest drivers because there's a good chance they've been updated since the included CD was made. I would only bother with the CD if it contains bundled software or drivers that are unavailable online. It looks like you should be able to download the latest ...


1

If you have access to any other computers that do have a CD drive, you can use Drive Sharing As Apple says, This convenient feature of OS X lets you wirelessly “borrow” the optical drive of a nearby Mac or PC. So you can install applications from a DVD or CD and have full access to an optical drive without having to carry one around.



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