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8

The Apple press release says "supports DisplayPort for high resolution displays and works with existing adapters for HDMI, DVI and VGA displays", but this is referring to the Thunderbolt output port (for daisy-chaining). The Thunderbolt Display will not work with a non-Thunderbolt machine without an adapter. But unfortunately now that the they have started ...


4

The Apple 15" MacBook Pro specification about Graphics and Video Support says: Dual display and video mirroring: Simultaneously supports full native resolution on the built-in display and up to 2560 by 1600 pixels on up to two external displays, at millions of colors Thunderbolt digital video output Native Mini DisplayPort output DVI output ...


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Certainly. The Retina MacBook Pro has one HDMI output and two Thunderbolt ports, so you can run the internal display and three external monitors as long as you can accept HDMI on your third monitor (with or without an adapter/converter). Any mini-DisplayPort adapter from Apple will work from Thunderbolt in addition to adapters labeled as Thunderbolt.


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Apple miniDisplayPort to VGA adapter


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I'm seeing on Apples site that the system requirements are as follows: Thunderbolt-enabled Mac computer, including MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac mini, and iMac OS X v10.6.8 or later That means it must be Thunderbolt enabled.


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No HDMI and DVI are both digital signals there will be no degradation in quality between the two. If in fact they are compatible with each other as referenced on Wikipedia. HDMI is backward-compatible with single-link Digital Visual Interface digital video (DVI-D or DVI-I, but not DVI-A). No signal conversion is required when an adapter or asymmetric ...


2

You can get DVI to HDMI adapters from around $4 online on Amazon, (just search for ‘DVI to HDMI’ on any online shopping site). As for the quality, most of the adapters that I have seen are able to do HD video and such. Hope this helped!


2

The supported resolutions defined on the Apple pages are for the built-in screen which is, pardon the pun, comparing apples to oranges in this case. Plugging an external monitor in will show those resolutions that the monitor supports and you will be able to achieve the maximum resolution of the Dell monitor which is 1600x900


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I have a late 2011 15 inch MBP and have successfully used Thunderbolt adaptors to connect to monitors via DVI and TV via HDMI with excellent results. You don't need a 16:10 screen - the display will adapt to various screen dimensions. I think you can plug just about anything in with a very high chance of success.


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Try opening System preferences -> Display. Press the Option button. This will change button Gather Windows to be Detect Displays. Clicking it might detect your VGA.


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I use a product from http://xlr8.com/ to give me a video input on my mac, then use a VGA-to-TV adapter to stream powerpoint over ustream. Video is really choppy and crappy looking, but for simple non-moving slides, it's OK for ustream.


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Both MacBook Pro and the Mac Mini have Mini-DisplayPort on them. You can connect the Mini-DisplayPort to an Minii-DisplayPort-to-VGA converter and then, connect VGA cable on it to a two-port VGA DDM KVM switch, such as ConnectPRO's UR-12+. I had been using this configuration for years without problem.


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The answer is still no! The graphic card inside the MacBook cannot handle video input! Only output! Second: There is currently no working adapter beside "HDMI to Thubderbolt". No converter yet!


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No, the feature you refers to is called Target Display Mode, it's only available on some Intel iMacs with Thunderbolt or Mini Display Port. And they are very picky about their source, only Macs with the Mini Display Port can output to iMacs with Mini Display Port, same for Thunderbolt. I believe Belkin has an accessory that will trick iMac into taking other ...


1

No MacBook Air is capable today of doing this without additional video-in hardware. Apple's FAQ on target display lists all hardware that can support video input: http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3924 In summary here are the current details of video on on Mac hardware that need no external video-in adapters: Model - cable needed iMac (27-inch Late ...


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Try logging into the machine with your display hooked up with HDMI (just so you can login), then switch over to VGA. Then try CMD + F2 (brightness up) to force detect displays and see if it switches over.


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Tha monitor has a DisplayPort connectiion as well as DVI. I'd suggest getting a mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable. That way you get the benefit of a digital connection and proper resolution. VGA isn't really designed for resolutions that high — it's possible, but often shaky.


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You need a product like this: KVM Console to USB 2.0 Portable Laptop Crash Cart Adapter However I don't know if that will show up as a streamable device (or if it's even compatible with Mac). There are also people who have had success buying a webcam and a VGA > Analogue adapter, and wiring the analogue adapter into the webcams electronics to get it back ...


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You can with hardware, but it's not going to be cheap. The main issue is going from analog (VGA) to digital; it's much easier to convert one digital format to another. One (clunky) solution would be to chain a VGA to DVI scaler ($330) to a DVI to Mini DisplayPort converter ($150). If you get similar products on eBay, you can get a complete solution for a ...


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Try resetting the PRAM: http://support.apple.com/kb/ht1379


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The problem is because analogue (VGA) connection is used and the "auto" positioning does not detect the image bounds correctly. Check your monitor controls (menu) and move the image left/right and up/down (usually labeled HPOS/VPOS). Here are my recommendations: Use the native resolution (1440 x 900) and 60 Hz refresh rate. If still not centered, use the ...



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