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11

This pictured connector on your mid 2007 13 inch MacBook is a mini DVI connector according to http://support.apple.com/kb/HT3235 The Apple part number for the Apple Mini-DVI to VGA Adapter is: M9320G. And the eBay link: http://www.ebay.com/sch/i.html?_nkw=M9320G


10

You should get a mini DisplayPort to VGA adapter (sometimes referred to as a Thunderbolt to VGA adapter, but it's the same thing). Apple sells one, but they can be had elsewhere for less, including at my personal favourite, Monoprice. You could do HDMI to VGA, but it would require a (typically bulky) active adapter. There are some HDMI to VGA adapters that ...


8

With the help of Mactracker, I've compiled a list of all the connectors used on Mac portables in the last decade or so. If you stick with machines since 2009 (actually late 2008 discounting one iteration of the 17" MBP), you can get away with just a mini-Displayport adapter. Adding to that a DVI and mini-DVI adapter will cover you every Intel (2006 and on) ...


7

There's no official way to achieve this. You have to jailbreak your iPad and use a software like DisplayOut (works on all iDevices) to do this.


4

I have several aftermarket mini DisplayPort to VGA adapters (el-cheapo like Monoprice.com) to work perfectly with several Macs and various monitors and projectors. Moreover, I am ever pleased and surprised at how well VGA works considering the old tech. It should "just work" for a 20" VGA display. The Displays control panel will let you select resolutions ...


3

You should connect the monitor through DisplayPort. You will need a Mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable for this. You will be able to get the full resolution of the display this way.


3

Certainly. The Retina MacBook Pro has one HDMI output and two Thunderbolt ports, so you can run the internal display and three external monitors as long as you can accept HDMI on your third monitor (with or without an adapter/converter). Any mini-DisplayPort adapter from Apple will work from Thunderbolt in addition to adapters labeled as Thunderbolt.


3

Just for clarification: With the iPad2, every app is mirrored on the VGA adapter by default, without any additional measures.


3

If you use a VGA connection, the Apple iPad Dock Connector to VGA Adapter might be of interest to you. http://store.apple.com/us/product/MC552ZM/A


3

I have a MacBook pro 15" retina and a Seiki 4k monitor. The monitor works great at 2160x3840 with HDMI plugged into the MacBook HDMI port. I bought an ACCELL Minidisplayport to HDMI adapter (Accell says it works @4K and is compliant with HDMI 1.4 and DisplayPort 1.2 high bit rate). I can only get 1080x1920.


3

I've had the same problems. I think youre leaving the lid to your mac open. If you are using an external keyboard, external mouse, and an external display, while your mac is powered, you can close the lid, hit the shift key a couple times to wake it up and I think you will see the desired resolution listed. There is a command line solution Get this ...


3

You cannot run VGA from the HDMI port the way you have it set up. You need a direct HDMI->VGA converter. The reason is that HDMI does not output analog signals. The cable head actually has a digital-to-analog converter chip in it, but your HDMI<->DVI adapter does not. So even though the DVI<->VGA adapter fits, the analog pins aren't actually ...


2

Check this question out, looks like a similar question to yours. How many monitors can the new retina MacBook Pro handle and at which pixels resolutions? Also, more specifically this: How many monitors can the 13" retina MacBook Pro output to? Seems you need Thunderbolt and HDMI to do it. And if you're talking about the latest MBP 13" then you may ...


2

I have the original one and it works just great. From my experience, ~99% of the projectors have a VGA port, some DVI. To be on the safe side, I would rather pick VGA than DVI if I'd had to choose one. I cannot say much about the non-official VGA adaptor, but I am using the original VGA adaptor for years now, and I am completely satisfied. But I also have a ...


2

You can get full resolution with mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort or mini DisplayPort to Dual-link DVI. Dual-link DVI supports up to 2560x1600 pixels resolution. DisplayPort supports that resolution or even higher. You will not get full resolution with mini DisplayPort to DVI. DVI is limited to 1920x1200 or something similar. You usually won't get full ...


2

I would just look in the app store for a video playback app that supports VGA output. Lots of them do now. You don't need to jailbreak your phone. Here is an app called "StreamToMe" that supports playback of your videos over 3G and Wi-Fi and has VGA output. StreamToMe: http://itunes.apple.com/us/app/streamtome/id325327899?mt=8#


2

Yes, mismatched resolutions are no problem. I'm running a similar set up right now. You can arrange them however you like in the Displays section of System Preferences.


2

VGA is an analog signal and your Cinema requires digital so you need more than a simple cable. You need an appropriate interface box, called a VGA to DVI Scaler, such as the Gefen VGA to DVI Scaler Plus. (Shown for reference only—this is not a recommendation.) You will also need the appropriate adaptor to use the DVI signal with your monitor. Please note ...


2

You will need a VGA to DVI scaler ($330 in mentioned link) + DVI to MDP adapter like this one ($70). And after that no guarantee that it will work all together.


2

Have you tried a SMC reset? Often fixes crazy port issues.


2

Does your monitor have DVI? I strongly suggest against VGA when possible. It has inferior quality, resolution support, and manual shape/size adjustment of the image is a pain. MacBooks with mini DisplayPort or Thunderbolt have the graphical oomph to drive at least 2560x1600 via a Dual-Link DVI adapter. Any resolution limitation would be imposed by the VGA ...


2

As Studer mentioned, there is no official way to do so. you can use the DisplayOut software for Jailbroken iPads. If you're more developer oriented, there is also this option


2

In a pinch, this usually works: Connect your computer to the projector and turn the projector on. Restart your Mac. It should now work.


2

Looking at this list, I'd say that the most important adapters for you to keep around are the mini-DVI, mini-DisplayPort and the Thunderbolt ones. The other two (micro-DVI and mini-VGA) are either old and outdated or simply quite rare. So for the most part you should be safe with those initial three. If you want to be completely on the safe side though, you ...


1

The recommendation I received was to open a call from "bugreport.apple.com" and hope that this is fixed in future updates of the operating system.


1

VGA on the PB278Q is limited to 1080p by the monitor's circuitry (check out the manual). The higher the resolution on VGA, the better the analog circuitry in the monitor needs to be in order to extract the signal. Asus bought a cheaper part, because most people aren't trying to use VGA at 2560x1440. DVI is limited by its spec to a max of widescreen 16:10 ...


1

Tha monitor has a DisplayPort connectiion as well as DVI. I'd suggest getting a mini DisplayPort to DisplayPort cable. That way you get the benefit of a digital connection and proper resolution. VGA isn't really designed for resolutions that high — it's possible, but often shaky.


1

You could try an HDMI to VGA converter like the Kanex ATVPRO. I would not try one of the cheap cables that go straight from HDMI to VGA. Verify that the converter produces a suitable resolution for your monitor.


1

This is the solution: The 15 inch Macbook uses 2 graphics cards. I use gfxCardStatus application to control which graphics card is used - OS X too easily allows apps to request the more powerful card, which drains the battery too quickly. Skype is an example of such an app. I just discovered that the integrated graphics card (the weaker one) cannot support ...


1

You can't. VGA is an analog transmission standard, HDMI is a digital transmission standard. It's not just a matter of changing the connector, the signals they carry are fundamentally different. You could look in to a USB 2.0 -> HDMI adaptor. Something like the ones on this page. Though how well those work depend largely on the graphics card in your Mac. ...



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