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0

If you want to completely delete it, you should cancel the current process as it is saving the whole user account to a disk image –which is why is taking so long– and restart without saving any data when prompted.


0

I had the same issue and solved it thusly: Open Terminal. sudo fdesetup list This will list usernames and uuids of the users FileVault knows about (warning: I'm unclear on the exact specifics of privileges granted by this file). sudo fdesetup remove -uuid [bad UUID] This will remove the erroneous user from the list. For some reason I had to reboot ...


4

You can come pretty close, but not absolutely lock the computer down. There are three critical steps to this: Put all of the files you want to keep private in private directories, e.g. in your Documents folder. The top level of your home folder is readable by all users, and the default permissions for newly created files and folders is similarly readable. ...


7

The only way to avoid a user being able to access your data is to remove your data from the machine. This is due to the fact that a user could enable the root user via Single User mode on boot and can then have unfettered access to the system. You can put up blocks to hinder this as well, but that depends on your desire to keep all information secure. A ...


6

Back around 1990 I was working on a project with a guy named Tom. We were using a SUN server running SunOS (a Unix derivative, predecessor to Solaris). This was back in the days before CD drives and flash drives, so if you messed up the OS on your hard drive there was no way to recover. Tom used to routinely log in as root. I told him that was a bad idea, ...


1

Use cmd+r then open Terminal and type: resetpassword On the next window, click on the name of your volume (usually “Macintosh HD”), then select the troubled user account name from the drop-down. Skip the actual password fields (you are not changing the password). Click the button on the bottom section labeled “Reset Home Folder Permissions and ACLs.” ...


1

Unless you're using backtrack/kali for a specific task: NO. Treat the super user as you would a loaded gun: if you have an immediate need and intention to use it: OK. If you can solve your problem in any other manner, however (e.g. "sudo"), do that.


0

NO! This will get your system broken into in a very short amount of time. Instead, su or sudo into root as necessary. If you absolutely, positively, must run as root, at least log out at any time when you're not using the computer. If your system is capable of running multiuser, but no users are configured, i suggest you create a privileged user (i.e: one ...


2

Just a few examples why it's not ok to always run as root: Root user can easily place files in locations that are far more difficult to track down. Root user has raw access to interfaces and so can put an interface into promiscuous or monitor mode and log ALL network traffic. Root user has raw access to device nodes and can thrash a disk making it far ...


4

In case the other reasons weren't good enough... Don't forget that you can't use Homebrew as root (which is actually a huge pain). Other programs also don't let you use them as root or run into permissions problems when you do, often times for no apparent reason, because their programmers assume that they won't be run as root. I think Steam is one of them. ...


13

Honestly, I agree that there are a lot of risks associated with using the root user as default. But let me just run through them and criticize some of the arguments a bit Defending against applications: Practically the permission system of *nix is not strong enough (by far) to allow running arbitrary programs. A malicious program on *nix is able to do ...


0

As finally 10.10 provides a correct "launchctl bsexec" implementation yo can use: sudo /bin/launchctl bsexec PID chroot -u UID -g GID / open /Applications/TextWrangler.app man says This executes the given command in as similar an execution context as possible to the target PID. So as PID param you can use the pid of the appropriate loginwindow ...


288

Using your computer logged in as root all the time is like always carrying around all your keys, your passport, $5,000 in cash, that piece of paper with all your passwords written on it and the only photo you have of Flopsy, the adorable rabbit whose death broke your seven-year-old heart. Oh, and a chainsaw. Which is to say, it's mighty convenient from time ...


8

Generally you want to keep ownership of your personal files separate from the root user. This is why you create a account for yourself as an administrator. The accepted way, under OS X, to gain root level access is to use the sudo command from the Terminal application. For example, if you want to see the partitioning of your internal drive the command is ...


17

You can, but it's a major security and stability risk. Doing so allows any application full access to your computer. You can't know what they're doing with that access. It's unnecessary, and just really unsafe. For a lot more background information on this, see Why is it bad to login as root Why not run always logged in as root Why it is not recommend to ...


1

A user name alias functions as a simple way to create a shorthand version of an account name. For example, if a users full account name is “Buscar웃SD” (which would be difficult to type every time to log in), one could setup an alias as “BSD” and just login with the shortened version instead.


-1

My problem is the permission in passwd archive, The old permission is -rw------- 1 root root 1280 Jun 9 15:41 passwd I used the command "chmod a+r /etc/passwd" and now all users can read this archive. -rw-r--r-- 1 root root 1280 Jun 9 15:41 passwd Logout the user and try. =)


0

Adding info to @Michael's post (this procedure still works in Yosemite): You can also do this (without TimeMachine), with a Virtual Machine also running OS X, by using Migration Assistant on the HOST and in the VM and: In the VM indicate that you want to transfer settings FROM another Mac On the Host indicate that you want to transfer settings TO another ...



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