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There is only one root account on every OS X computer and it is disabled by default. It doesn't have a password and you can't login as root unless you specifically use Directory Utility and enable it. It's dangerous, because when logged in as root the system bypasses all authorization - it doesn't even ask for a password. In that aspect, an OS X computer is ...


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Let me see how your reasons would work or not: Admin accounts are not root. While true, they may be able to call sudo and perhaps they may even have the password ready for input (or sudo was configured not to ask for password). SIP (System Integrity Protection): This is only one layer which is not enough for all attacks. Can be disabled? Even better! ...


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There are probably other reasons, but here's mine: it is not possible to place restrictions on the admin account. It is useful to have restrictions in place to prevent oneself from visiting undesirable or dangerous sites.


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Remove accounts.plist file from /Users/username/Library/Mail/V2/MailData/ as well as /Users/username/Library/Preferences/com.apple.internetaccounts.plist Log out, then log back in. Try it again.


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All you’ll need to do is download GIFPaper (Dropbox link). As described in How to Use an Animated GIF as Wallpaper on Your Mac install the preference pane, and then head into System Settings. In System Settings, you’ll find the new GIFPaper option. Click it, then pick the GIF you want to use. It will automatically load up. If you want the animated GIF as ...


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It is generally considered best practice to use an account that has no more privileges than are required. What this means generally is that you should use an account that has the lowest privilege level possible, and elevate your privileges when it is needed for a specific task that requires the higher privileges. However, this gets annoying rather quickly. ...


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OS X Yosemite (10.10) and older: Applications → Utilities → Disk Utility Select the startup disk from the list of volumes. Click the First Aid tab. To check permissions, click Verify Disk Permissions. To repair permissions, click Repair Disk Permissions. Source: https://support.apple.com/en-au/HT201560 You can also do it from Terminal using ...



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