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Same thing happened with my dead standard 2011 Macbook Pro. Got stuck while booting after the upgrade. Hard rebooted after a few hours. Had to run disk checker but now everything appears to be fine.


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I upgraded to Windows 10 before Microsoft notified me to do so. I did not have a Product Key. I was able to boot the computer, but I had many problems. Windows 10 did activate. This allowed me to erase Windows and do a clean install. This resulted in an installation where the earlier problems did not reappear. When I installed previous versions of Windows, ...


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The Retina MacBooks use a format of SSD that can be replaced, but Apple does not make it especially easy for simple replacement. Rather than the more familiar 2.5" HD format you might be familar with, the Retina use a newer blade style, somewhat similar to memory modules. Your best bet it to look over the ifixit guides, to see what is involved: ...


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I do have a MacBook Pro 13" mid 2012 (no Retina), and I was able to upgrade both RAM (from 4GB to 16GB) and the drive (from the standard Hard Drive to Solid State Drive). I bought the items on Amazon and did it myself, it wasn't difficult at all (and there are tons of tutorials around the web). You must check how old is your Mac: in the newest models you ...


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In the past, Apple doesn't upgrade any storage as a rule. This is HDD/SSD across the board. The only exceptions I've known are: If you have several internal bays and you buy the part (Think Mac Pro with 4 SATA bays or Xserve / Xserve RAID) You are paying for a service repair and they upgrade you for free to a larger drive. You don't ask for it, but Apple ...


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To put it simply: yes, using the installer provided by the App Store is sufficient. Keep in mind that Apple develops and designs these installers specifically so that users, like you, can update to the newest system. All you need to do is click the download button and follow the onscreen instructions to update. There is always a risk factor of something ...


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The RAM you listed there will work perfectly fine. Whenever buying RAM just make sure you have the correct type (DDR3 in your case) and the correct speed (1333 MHz or PC10666 in your case). It won't 'break' your MacBook but instead it just won't boot if you have the incorrect type or speed of RAM in your MacBook. RAM has no saved state when turning your ...


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It's very unlikely that bad RAM will "break" your MacBook. However, it may not boot with bad RAM installed, but putting the original RAM back in should allow it to function properly again. Really, as long as the RAM is made for Mac, has the right form-factor and specs, and is returnable, I'd give it a try.


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Most of the time the OS X upgrade routines work quite reliably and in this case there shouldn't be any deal-breakers like Rosetta back in the days. However, it is impossible to tell for sure. What I usually do, is to clone my system to either a second partition in the internal drive or to an external (USB) drive (using a tool like SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy ...


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Sorry, the MacBook Pro processor is soldered on and removing it would likely destroy the logic board. I still have a 2009 MacBook Pro and it's fine, not to say that I wouldn't want a newer MacBook, though. Btw: Get an SSD for it. Replacing the hard drive with one cut boot up time in half for me. I personally recommend Intel.


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This post explains the procedure. Now is probably a good time to make a backup. Then proceed at your own risk... Get gdisk In Terminal: sudo gdisk /dev/disk0 Press v to verify your MBR Press r and then o to list the MBR partition table Press m and then p to display the GPT partition table information Compare the numbers for partition 4 from the MBR and GPT ...



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