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From Apple Support: To migrate another photo library manually: Quit Photos. Hold down the Option key and open Photos. Select the library you want to open. If the library you want isn’t listed, click Other Library. Navigate to the library you want and click Open. You can also drag the library you’d like to open to the Photos icon ...


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I installed 2x 2GB DDR3 1333 PC3-10600 into a late 2009 mac mini. Running 10.10.2, which struggles on the default 2GB. It started up fine, and apps were so snappy, but then the crashes started. The machine is completely unstable, with kernel panic errors every 30 odd seconds forcing a restart. Sadly the original 2GB RAM has gone back in. I'd recommend ...


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Due to the fact that Apple provides upgrades and fresh installations of their operating systems for free, they would (in most cases) only provide support for the latest operating system and (in many cases) the one before it (in today's case (as of the time of this answer), OS X Yosemite and OS X Mavericks respectfully). If there is something wrong with ...


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The answer to your question, in short: It is always advised that you have the latest possible OS for your computer. This is due to the myriad of bug fixes and security patches that come along with new OS updates and intermediary releases. I would suggest bumping up the RAM to the highest possible as well, but at least to 4GB. This should result in an ...


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For every OS X 'delta' release - 10.10.1/2/3/ ...10.10.4 etc - which App Store will download to each Mac there is a simultaneous 'combo' update release which rolls up all the previous deltas into one single downloadable update. It was for many years considered the 'pro' way to do the update, as it can also correct potential update issues that the delta ...


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Did you update to iOS 8.4 yet? If not, now would be the time. In iTunes - sync; backup; update. If you're already on 8.4, then sync; backup; restore.


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The OS X Server App allows you to cache data on your network as well as manage multiple devices and installations/updates on them. This would simplify things for you in the long run, but there might be a slight learning curve to start out. I haven't used the Yosemite version of the Server App yet so can't give you more specifics. It's something to look into ...


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The same reason why nobody takes Samsung and HTC seriously: if your device can handle the latest but you won't update to the latest, you're just going to miss out on features and optimizations. You also risk your security and the security of others. Because there are very few situations where you should be on any older than the latest version your system can ...


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Short answer: Because that's Apple's update policy. Longer answer: Maintaining and supporting several major iOS versions is a lot of work, even if the older versions would just get security fixes. It's not just about the source code, any update also needs testing, dealing with apps which may break, update of various support documents etc. So you get both ...


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Apple has decided to remove previous versions when a new (replacement) is released. You could scan the web and find other versions from someone else but not from Apple.


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Permissions and what to do Sometimes, permissions can get messed up. The system get's confused on who has access to what which has many side-effects. I know of a few ways of tackling this problem. Repairing Disk Permissions This uses .bom files to repair permissions. .bom files, or "Bill of Materials", and are used as installation files: BOM files ...


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Apple MacBook Pro "Core i7" 2.4 15" Late 2011 Standard RAM: 4 GB Maximum RAM: 16 GB* Details: 4 GB of RAM is installed as two 2 GB modules, no slots free. *Apple officially supports a maximum of 8 GB of RAM, but third-parties have determined that this model actually is capable of using up to 16 GB of RAM with two 8 GB memory modules. Speed: ...


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Well, this is where you go to find the current firmware for all iMac's: EFI and SMC firmware updates for Intel-based Macs. In the case of the MacPro1,1, the two updates would be: Mac Pro EFI Firmware Update 1.2 Mac Pro SMC Firmware Update 1.1


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Internally there is 64 bit addressing. Externally, this would mean 64 wires on the logic board. But, there is no point in having more wires than needed. So the actual number of wires is equal to the the maximum amount of memory the computer is designed to handle. You can not add memory. There are no additional wires to solder the memory to.


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Automatically Through Software Update It is likely that OS X will automatically prompt you to download and install any recommended firmware update. This happens as part of OS X's software update process. See About firmware updates for Intel-based Macs for the specific update steps on older Macs: Learn how to locate, download, and apply a firmware ...


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RAM: Look in OWC to se if replacement memory for your MBA. If so you will find instructions on how to change it. SSD: same as before, for some models they have replacement SSD.


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For anyone else encountering this issue when upgrading to Yosemite, the way I eventually got past it was simply to reinstall Mavericks, and then to upgrade to Yosemite. Worked like a charm, after trying various things like clearing cache, flushing DNS, running in safe mode etc without success. This solution was recommended to me by Apple Tech Support ...


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Your Etrecheck report shows the RAM to be OK. 8 GB RAM Upgradeable BANK 0/DIMM0 4 GB DDR3 1333 MHz ok BANK 1/DIMM0 4 GB DDR3 1333 MHz ok It also shows some obsoleted start up items that you can remove. Startup Items: HWNetMgr: Path: /Library/StartupItems/HWNetMgr HWPortDetect: Path: /Library/StartupItems/HWPortDetect ...


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The best way to resolve hardware RAM issues is to isolate this around one of the sticks of RAM. This is most likely a hardware issue, that will only show as a bunch of random software impacts, making it really hard to diagnose. Remove all the RAM, and put in only one new 4GB stick in, then start the Mac. If it boots and runs, then you have a good stick. Try ...


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First step in Troubleshooting to do is to start in Safe mode. (Hold Shift during start up) That will eliminate 99% of foreign applications causing the problem. That will also show if it is a hardware problem. Sometimes it is enough to start in Safe mode to fix small problems. If problem continues, run the Apple Hardware test, that might show problems with ...


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The drive will be bound by the speed of the technology in your computer. 1.5Gbps is fast enough for the cheapest SSDs money can buy, but anything better than that is going to saturate the bandwidth. You'll definitely see a performance improvement over an HDD, even with this limitation, but don't go buying a high-performance SSD.


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Every iMac from the mid-2007 release onwards can run Yosemite, and the last model that couldn't could also only address 3GB of RAM. So it's almost certain that your iMac will be able to run Yosemite.


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I concur with your observations. I was ready to toss this 2008 dual 2.8 Quad Core machine as it seemed deathly slow compared to my PC. As a last ditch effort to save it I upgraded to Yosemite, threw in 12 GB of 800MHz DDR2 Ram, a 500 GB Samsung SSD boot disk, and an nVidia GeForce GTX770 which I bought on eBay. The machine once again rocks. I couldn't be ...


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The latest MacBook Pro 13" (MacBookPro12,1) comes with a special internal HD interface based on PCIe and uses a special form factor for the SSD. Check the ifixit replacement guide how it looks like. This replacement guide shows a MacBook Pro 2014 but the SSD in the recent model looks similar. So internally there is neither space nor an appropriate interface ...


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The old Macbook Pro is still available on Apple Store.


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Personally, I wouldn't risk buying anything that is not explicitly supported. You may run into problems in the long term if the memory modules draw too much power or are too fast/slow. You may want to check corsair.com/en-us/…, a 2x8GB memory module pack with 11-11-11-30 CAS timing (that is, CL=11, as Apple recommends). Corsair states that their "memory ...


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Setting aside any concerns that you won't realize much gain - just buy the RAM from a vendor that will back up the use you intend and/or offer pre-sales assistance to ensure you don't need to return product that works fine but is installed in the wrong Mac. I can't vouch for that particular model, but the Mac logic boards are now easily identified by ...



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