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7

iFixit, who is a proponent of replacing everything in your system, does not provide a guide to replace the RAM (only the entire logic board, on which the RAM is soldered). This alone should tell you that it is something that should not be attempted by users who are not professionals. One user did ask in their forums if it was possible. Here's one response: ...


3

Don't get a 128GB SSD. You don't want to run a 3rd party SSD on OS X without a decent amount of free space since you won't have TRIM support. Does Activity Monitor show memory pressure? If not, I'd save my pennies until I could afford a 256GB or 512GB SSD. I've done both RAM and SSD upgrades many times and an SSD has always been by far the best upgrade in ...


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Once programs are started they reside in RAM. So if you have enough RAM they will be fast. A fast SSD will be also helpful but usually it is not used much during normal operation if you have large RAM space. I would start with RAM upgrade, since the RAM is acting as SSD but it is faster. Main difference in SSD you will see when starting up the ...


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Or is it massively more difficult to solder new memory into a laptop than it is to solder some simple electronics project? Yes, it is; although "massively more difficult" is almost an understatement. It's an entirely different process. Take a close look at the Macbook Air motherboard. The RAM chips are the four large components in the red box on the ...


2

The old days keeping as much RAM free as possible are gone. The new RAM management from OS X, use all available memory, but also manages it so that you get maximum performances. If you look in the Activity Monitor- memory, you will see things like Memory Pressure, Compressed among other information.


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You'd probably had a lot of compressed memory in your 4GB days. Now, with 8GB, you're not nearing your limit yet so your computer doesn't see a need to compress anything. If you ever hit 7.99GB, you'll start building up compressed memory again. (I recently went from 4GB to 10GB, and I'm currently using 9.97GB but only have 7.1MB of compressed memory.)


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There are potentially a few things happening here. When a computer runs out of available RAM it starts swapping or paging data out of RAM to files on your hard disk. When your Mac was previously saying that it was using 3.98GB of 4GB it could also potentially have had a lot more data loaded but part of it swapped out to your hard drive. You can find these ...


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If you want to boot up programs faster, i would advice you buy the SSD first. This is the part of your computer that is responsible for booting up programs.


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Chrome is updated automatically by a process that runs in the background. Though sometimes I have to launch it and update it from the"About Chrome" menu selection, that may me being to picky avoid what Little Snitch tells me about... Anyway you don't (or shouldn't) have to do anything, it will update all by itself with no loss of anything. Just check "About ...


1

Update: I just found out from this answer Where can I get a copy of Mavericks after Yosimite has been released? that it is possible to download if you are a member of the Apple Developer Mac program. I tried the link from the US Store https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/id675248567?mt=12 but it appears it is not available anymore. I found this from reddit ...


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If you have ever previously 'bought' Mavericks from the App Store, it will be available in your Purchases list & you can download it again. Mine is showing 'resume' as I tried a partial download to test it still works.


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No, you cannot add more RAM. Open up Activity monitor, located in the Utilities folder of the Applications folder (or just search using Spotlight) /Applications/Utilities/Activity Monitor Go to the memory tab and check out the memory pressure and swap used. If the memory pressure is too high (yellow/red graph) you can figure out which applications are ...


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The solution we came up with... the only one that worked, was to reinstall Yosemite. It seemed at the time that something went sideways with the original upgrade. Unfortunately I do not have all the details with me here.


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@AJP - your computer can actually support up to 16BG of ram (1066mhz 8GB x2 sticks notebook DDR3 memory). My 2010 MacBook Pro has a nearly identical motherboard and runs 16GB fine, as will yours (2.4 GHz Core 2 Duo CPU.)


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In my experience, an SSD has led to faster load times (a formerly-1:20 boot time became 18 seconds!), but a RAM upgrade has epically increased the stability of the computer (I used to get the beach ball of death on a daily basis, which the SSD did nothing to combat, but I can count how many times I've gotten it since going from 4 to 10 GB a few weeks ago on ...


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In general, no. Most of your settings will remain intact, but some of them may be reset or irrelevant in Yosemite.


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I upgraded from Mavericks to Yosemite several months ago, and didn't notice any differences with OS preferences. They should stay the same. However some application specific preferences may change, but I would guess that for most standard apps, like Mail, your preferences would remain intact. But it would help if you were more specific about what kind of ...



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