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There is only one available 2.66 GHZ Quad-Core Intel Xeon Mac Pro, which actually is powered by two 2.66 GHz dual core Intel Xeon 5150 processors: MacPro1,1 The maximum OS is Mac OS X 10.7.5, if the RAM was upgraded to at least 2 GB.


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It is possible to upgraded a MacPro1,1 to Yosemite, but it is a bit of work and not perfect. You will have to add a third-party new boot loader software, and most likely upgrade the graphics card. A number of OS X -- mostly minor -- features will not be available. This is almost like building a Hackintosh, but Apple will not consider you as violating OS X's ...


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I would go with the SSD. First you can check to see how much benefit you would get from upgrading the RAM. You can look at the Activity Monitor.app memory section. The last several versions of Mac OS X have a graph describing "Memory Pressure", which is a way of describing how hard you are pushing the RAM. The OS will naturally try to make use of ALL of the ...


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Yes, like on every other computer you can mix the ram sizes. Though watch for the frequences (they have to be at same or higher) and the compatibilites.


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The newer imacs support dual channel what means that tou can have 2 different sorts of ram memory. But make sure that there are at least 2 of the same installed so: 2x 4 gb and 2x 8gb should work fine. For more info, thid link


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The MacBook Pro: How to remove or install memory article you linked does not state 1600 MHz for MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2011)! It actually states "PC3-10600 DDR3 1333 MHz type RAM". I would not purchase 1600 MHz RAM and instead purchase what is specified. As to voiding the warranty for upgrading the RAM yourself, I was told at an Apple store that it ...


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Open up activity monitor and check your RAM usage. If it's high pressure (check the graph), or even swapping files, you will benefit from more RAM. Any computer will benefit heavily from installing an SSD. Expect everything to go 10x faster (not kidding). Also, it will make you not having enough RAM less of a problem, as it will speed up your swap. So it ...


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Yep it'll be compatible, your HDD is a SATA II. But because of the SATA2 limitation (~300MB/s) you won't be able to use your SSD at full speed.


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Yes, that drive will work for your Macbook. However, keep in mind that your machine uses a SATA II interface. This means that the maximum throughout is 300 MB/s. Though SATA III drives, such as the one you link to, are backwards compatible, there’s no benefit to spending the extra money. You are better off finding a SATA II SSD. Either way, you will notice a ...


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I have that same model and have a 240GB SSD from OWC in it. Have had for probably two years. It works very well and since you just need a 3G model you can get one for like $125.00 or so.


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Realistically the speed difference between 1866 and 2133 isn't going to make a significant impact on your overall system speed. It's a 266MHz difference but this does not affect overall performance in the same way a 266MHz CPU speed bump would. You say you are running virtualised environments, so upgrading to 16GB - whatever the RAM speed - will have more ...


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Agree. SSD upgrade will make everything you do on that laptop faster. More memory will only kick in as a boost from time to time. If you do a lot of compiling, all those little include files will hit the SSD sweet spot and you'll feel like you have a new computer.


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The more advanced version, results in most memory consumption system. So, if you are only care about performance, no doubts, Mountain Lion must be your choice.



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