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You first have to remove the swap partition and the visible Recovery HD with gpt and then you will be able to resize your Macintosh HD with Disk Utility. Boot to Internet Recovery Mode by pushing altcmdR while booting. Then open Terminal.app and enter (assuming disk0 is your main disk): gpt -r show /dev/disk0 Unmount your main disk with: diskutil ...


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I recently looked into this myself. Note, I had an easier time installing Ubuntu over Debian, but it may have been due to a corrupt Debian image. Here's what I did: First step is to install the boot manager rEFInd (http://www.rodsbooks.com/refind/). If you're like me and don't like the default GUI it can easily be themed. Make some free space on the hard ...


-1

You can use VirtualBox and install Kali Linux on it. I am using Kali Linux 2 on my MacBook Pro. I have assigned it 4GB RAM and it runs smoothly.


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GUI You can use the native OS X Disk Utility.app to split, resize, create & remove partitions as desired. CLI If you prefer to work with a UNIX-style bash shell, there are tools available via OS X's native Terminal.app command-line interface. One of these would be a good start: root@host:~# diskutil root@host:~# diskutil list root@host:~# ...


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Getting a bit creative, but you can also run a java app using VNC that either has a http server, or in my case uses a loop to look for a file and create that file using SSH. Here is my java app.


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For people stumbling upon this in an OS X 10.11+ era (El Capitan or newer): Apple has added a whole new layer of security in OS X. They have taken away some privileges from root. The file you are trying to modify has a restricted flag. Only restricted processes which are signed by Apple will be able to modify these files. However, you can disable this ...


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Press cmd-r when booting to take it into recovery mode. Here you can click on Disk Utility and choose a startup disk/partition. You might need a driver to use the wireless devices with Linux.


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If you want better answers, try refining your question. Also, post a comment after my answer, so I will be notified. Question: 1) Recovery HD is visible, which, I could be mistaken, but this shouldn't be visible OR mounted in Disk Utility Answer: In the MBR partition table, the id should be AB and you have AF. In the GPT, the partition type should ...


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mtklr's (and Patrix') solution will work, but I find it's simpler to use a while read loop when dealing with a file list from find ... -print0: find /Users '!' -path '/Users/Shared*' -type f -print0 | while IFS= read -d '' -r file; do if file "$file" | grep -iq ": .*executable"; then chmod 700 "$file" else chmod ...


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fwiw, find [options] -print0, when used in conjunction with (piped to) xargs -0 [options], handles filenames with spaces, without messing with for loops or IFS: find /Users ! -path '/Users/Shared*' -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -I {} \ bash -c 'if [[ "$(file -b --mime-type -- "{}")" = "application/x-mach-binary" ]]; then chmod 700 "{}" ...


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In your example, the command would be as shown below. ./install.sh --alldrivers --ownhfs /dev/disk0s5. I assume disk0s5 has been formatted "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)". I don't think I would use a 17.1 GB partition. The rEFInd partition on my Mac is 134 MB in size. If you need to write to disk0s5 while booted to Ubuntu, you may have to disable ...


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I was able to resolve the issue by changing IFS to IFS=$(echo -en "\n\b") and not quoting the filename. IFS is Internal Field Separator, it is used (among others) for word splitting after shell expansions, and it includes a space by default. I found the IFS trick at nixCraft's BASH Shell: For Loop File Names With Spaces. $ cat fix-perms.sh #!/bin/bash ...


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find can handle spaces in file names. Your for loops are causing the problems. You can put your logic in multiple find commands. Not every directory in a user's home folder should be accessible to only them self. Public and Sites come to mind. You can fix them separately in another find command. find /Users/* ! -path '/Users/Shared*' -type d ! \( -name ...


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Single user or Verbose mode. Verbose mode start up Restart the Mac Immediately hold down the command + V keys You have successfully entered verbose mode when you see white text appear on the screen. See Apple Support


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More than likely, He is talking about single user mode. Single user mode is a state of the operating system used to repair functionality of the operating system.


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There's no such thing (from the user point-of-view). Mac OS X is not an open-source operating system.


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If you have a Time Machine backup connected, you should be able to boot your mac while pressing the ALT-key and select the Time Machine backup. Most likely you will have to delete your internal harddrive and reinstall from the backup.


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If you have access to another mac, you can make a yosemite bootable install usb. http://liondiskmaker.com/ has a applescript program that will creae one, you just need a usb stick with 8gb and the installer downloaded. Boot the messed up computer from the USB stick by holding shift during the boot sequence and selecting the USB stick. There you can ...


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Try this way: sed '1,13d' filename | head -n -6 The sed command can be used to delete a range of lines. Here 1 and 13 are min and max line numbers.


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You can do it all with tail tail -n+14 FILE | tail -r | tail -n+7 | tail -r The first tail removes the top 13 lines The second tail reverses the line order The third tail removes the top 6 lines of the reversed order The last tail reverses the line order again


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Here's my try, not so elegant but works: cat myFile | tail -n+14 | head -n $[ $(wc -l myFile | awk '{ print $1 }') - 19 ] Note: last 19 is 13 + 6 It's better to embed this into a script: #!/bin/bash ...


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The problem is that the NumLock state gets stuck to On inside the RDP client. Tools like numlockx don't help - the client returns the state back to On. It's not just the allow keys that stop working - Ins, Del, Home, End, PgUp and PgDown are affected as well. The solution I found is to remove all references to keypad keys affected by NumLock from the xmodmap ...


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VirtualBox works very well with OS X as a host. Performance will depend on the specs of your specific MacBook, but if you are responsible with your resources (don't have every one of your apps open at the same time), you probably won't have a problem. Certainly won't hurt to try.


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I have had this problem to. However I come with a solution for those who even need a single click secondary button. Instructions Click start Search and Open BootCamp (when opening your computer will ask to give the application privileges , agree) There is a tap that says "Trackpad" select it Make any adjustments to he trackpad you may need such as ...


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I've figured out how to do this. In short, you must send a "Feature Report" consisting of the bytes 0x9, 0x0, 0x0, 0x0 to the appropriate hidraw device as root. You can find the right hidraw device with this command: dmesg | grep Apple | grep Keyboard | grep input0 | tail -1 | sed -e 's/.*hidraw\([[:digit:]]\+\).*/\/dev\/hidraw\1/' The code to send the ...


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The "toggling CapsLock-NoAction off/on" solution that the OP refers to works on both my wired Mac keyboard and my MacBookPro keyboard. Bradley says this only works on Yosemite, but I've used it successfully on Snow Leopard (10.6.8) and Mavericks (10.9.5). I have also tested this inside a Kubuntu VM and Caps Lock continued working correctly inside the VM. ...



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