Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

VirtualBox works very well with OS X as a host. Performance will depend on the specs of your specific MacBook, but if you are responsible with your resources (don't have every one of your apps open at the same time), you probably won't have a problem. Certainly won't hurt to try.


3

Single user or Verbose mode. Verbose mode start up Restart the Mac Immediately hold down the command + V keys You have successfully entered verbose mode when you see white text appear on the screen. See Apple Support


3

fwiw, find [options] -print0, when used in conjunction with (piped to) xargs -0 [options], handles filenames with spaces, without messing with for loops or IFS: find /Users ! -path '/Users/Shared*' -type f -print0 | xargs -0 -I {} \ bash -c 'if [[ "$(file -b --mime-type -- "{}")" = "application/x-mach-binary" ]]; then chmod 700 "{}" ...


3

For people stumbling upon this in an OS X 10.11+ era (El Capitan or newer): Apple has added a whole new layer of security in OS X. They have taken away some privileges from root. The file you are trying to modify has a restricted flag. Only restricted processes which are signed by Apple will be able to modify these files. However, you can disable this ...


1

I've figured out how to do this. In short, you must send a "Feature Report" consisting of the bytes 0x9, 0x0, 0x0, 0x0 to the appropriate hidraw device as root. You can find the right hidraw device with this command: dmesg | grep Apple | grep Keyboard | grep input0 | tail -1 | sed -e 's/.*hidraw\([[:digit:]]\+\).*/\/dev\/hidraw\1/' The code to send the ...


1

mtklr's (and Patrix') solution will work, but I find it's simpler to use a while read loop when dealing with a file list from find ... -print0: find /Users '!' -path '/Users/Shared*' -type f -print0 | while IFS= read -d '' -r file; do if file "$file" | grep -iq ": .*executable"; then chmod 700 "$file" else chmod ...


1

find can handle spaces in file names. Your for loops are causing the problems. You can put your logic in multiple find commands. Not every directory in a user's home folder should be accessible to only them self. Public and Sites come to mind. You can fix them separately in another find command. find /Users/* ! -path '/Users/Shared*' -type d ! \( -name ...


1

I was able to resolve the issue by changing IFS to IFS=$(echo -en "\n\b") and not quoting the filename. IFS is Internal Field Separator, it is used (among others) for word splitting after shell expansions, and it includes a space by default. I found the IFS trick at nixCraft's BASH Shell: For Loop File Names With Spaces. $ cat fix-perms.sh #!/bin/bash ...


1

In your example, the command would be as shown below. ./install.sh --alldrivers --ownhfs /dev/disk0s5. I assume disk0s5 has been formatted "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)". I don't think I would use a 17.1 GB partition. The rEFInd partition on my Mac is 134 MB in size. If you need to write to disk0s5 while booted to Ubuntu, you may have to disable ...


1

You can do it all with tail tail -n+14 FILE | tail -r | tail -n+7 | tail -r The first tail removes the top 13 lines The second tail reverses the line order The third tail removes the top 6 lines of the reversed order The last tail reverses the line order again


1

Try this way: sed '1,13d' filename | head -n -6 The sed command can be used to delete a range of lines. Here 1 and 13 are min and max line numbers.


1

There's no such thing (from the user point-of-view). Mac OS X is not an open-source operating system.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible