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Am away from my MacBook Pro. Will definitely try tomorrow;) Thanks!!


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To remove or move the Backups.backupdb folder open Terminal.app. Enter cd /Volumes/<Name_of_BackupDrive>/.Trashes to change the working directory. <Name_of_BackupDrive> has to be the volume name of your TM backup volume. Enter sudo ls -laO to show all folders. Usually you should see only one folder with the name 501 now: d-wx-wx-wt@ 3 root ...


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Hit “enter Time Machine” Press the key combination shift-command-C Then (very important) select a red bar to go back in time Explanation: dull red bars represent backups you cannot access, bright red bars you can Then from Macintosh HD navigate to desired folder you want to restore Backups will now be accessible and you can select the folder you want to ...


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Since you have made a full backup, I recommend a full wipe and restore. 120GB plus CoreStorage plus "I had 1TB before" sounds like this is a fusion drive that you have disconnected. Reboot the machine in recovery mode (Command-R at power-on) and open Disk Utility. Very easy from there to reformat the internal drives either separately or as a fusion drive ...


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Try booting in Recovery mode(Cmd +R) and see if it's recognised there. Also check if it's recognised on other computers.


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A common Time Machine backup drive (with the root folder /Backups.backupdb/Computername/... only) itself is no bootable system. You always have to boot from Recovery Mode, Internet Recovery Mode or another bootable drive containing a bootable base or full OS X. Booted to one of the mentioned systems allows you to restore the Time Machine backup to your main ...


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It seems the problem is coming from the finder. When I relaunch it (regularly), I can access the content of the .sparsebundle file.


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To mount your .sparsebundle (requires command line), try hdiutil mount /path/to/sparsebundle Ensure that your EX2 is mounted as a network share on your Mac. Usually, this will involve mounting your Time Machine share to reveal your .sparsebundle. Be aware that this will take a substantial amount of time depending on the size of your .sparsebundle. ...


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Use Disk Utility to reformat the old drive. It will be much quicker than forcing the Finder to delete hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of files by throwing it in the trash. If you have other files on this old disk you want to keep on this drive, you can: copy them to another disk; reformat the old disk; copy them back to old disk or use ...


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If a file had "left" the drive and came back there is clearly no way to determine it was the same file, short of doing a scan of the file. For an in-place directory move, Time Machine apparently doesn't track unix "inode" numbers for saving copy time and space. There is probably no point 99% of the cases. You can demonstrate this by looking at the Unix "...


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According to Apple, at https://support.apple.com/kb/PH21902?locale=en_US If you add a Time Machine backup disk to the privacy list, you will continue to see messages that Spotlight is indexing your backup disk. This indexing is necessary for Time Machine to function properly and can’t be disabled. Spotlight does exclude from searches any items you ...


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I've been asking myself this very question, and the answers on here certainly helped. However there's an aspect that's lacking which may be a new implementation "detail" that didn't exist when this question was answered. tmutil delete does indeed delete backups, but doesn't actually reclaim the space they took, at least not in any guaranteed way. I spent ...


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Possible solution 1: Instead of following Apple's recommendation of copying the backup in the Finder, you might want to try to use Disk Utility to restore the disk to the new disk (if the new disk is completely empty). Possible solution 2: Follow these instructions to make sure that MAC Address and UUID match. I have successfully used this solution in a ...


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I like to use BackupLoupe to locate the files I want to restore and not actually do the lifting. Once you have a Finder window - you could use Finder to show you the progress of the copy or even use a tool custom designed for syncing folders that can be paused / stopped / resumed. http://www.kaleidoscopeapp.com does file merges primarily but it's also ...


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TM can only run one backup scheme. You can include the other external drive to backup to the existing TM backup drive or drives along with your Mac HD drive. Or you can back up all drives to the new 1TB drive (or drives if you want to add others). The 500 Gig drives are not big enough to backup all drives too. What you might consider is using CCC or ...


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I've ended up answering my own question as follows: I wasn't able to delete files from the Time Machine backup and got the following message: The operation can't be completed because backup items can't be modified I rebooted using Command+R and then tried to restore from Time Machine. I kept getting errors saying the new drive was too small. I then ...


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If it is an IMAP account (don't know if GMAIL accepts POP3) I'm afraid the Time Machine is useless because those mails were not in the local storage - your HDD or SDD, so there is no way Time Machine keep it in backup files. This emails was in a remote Google server and you will have to try their recovery tools. Usually, the server will keep the deleted ...


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You can use any of the existing solutions from the existing question Custom Scheduling of Time Machine backups by disabling System Integrity Protection first using csrutil disable in Terminal from the Recovery HD. Once the changes have been made, you can re-enable SIP by running the same command but using ‘enable’ in the place of ‘disable’, also from ...


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On newer OS - the io is throttled in some cases. You can review these steps in case they apply in your case. Time Machine ridiculously slow after El Capitan upgrade The throttle should be evident in observing the backupd usage of the filesystem: sudo fs_usage backups Writing a command to /etc/sysctl.conf and then restarting should disable that throttle: ...


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Time Machine and OS X is tuned to throttle the IO and possibly the CPU usage of the backup task. You can do a few things to modify that behavior - but from the speed benchmark and my experience - a 12 to 48 hour initial backup is not abnormal or indicative of slow backups once you have a few intervals backed up. You could log out and minimize other apps / ...


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The speed you see there is not unusual. I have seen various USB3 external harddrives vary from about 60 MB/s to about 120 MB/s. These speeds can be expected from ordinary hard drives - you'll to buy an SSD to get much higher speeds. However please keep in mind that these speeds are the bulk transfer speed. I.e. if you transfer only one large file without ...


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The first backup will always take a long time. Possibly even overnight. Then it gets faster because it backups only modified files. I had the same speed with an Airport Time Capsule.



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