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2

If you hold down the Option key and then click the Time Machine menu in the menubar, you will see a “Verify Backups” menu item which you can use to have Time Machine compare the contents of the source disk to the contents of the backup disk.


2

The mechanism to force a full backup isn't well documented, but it does get logged to the console logs as Forcing deep traversal on source: "Macintosh HD" ... but even if this happens, the system will base the storage of new copies of files on what exists on the backup volume previously. I would add a new drive and back up to it once if you are concerned ...


1

Go to Disk Utility, select the disk on the left, go to the Erase tab, specify the format as FAT32, enter a name and click Erase.


3

Simply use Finder to drag a copy of the folders you want to maintain out of the Backup.backupdb hierarchy and then delete the copies left in Time Machine or delete all backups. How can I manually delete old backups to free space for Time Machine? http://support.apple.com/kb/HT1427 - You can also enter the Time Machine restore interface and find files that ...


1

Yes. OS X Server specifically includes the Time Machine Server software that makes it easier for Time Machine backups from machines on your network to reach, wakeup and perform their Time Machine backups to the server using native Time Machine data transfer protocols. OS X Server can act as a designated Time Machine backup location for all the Mac ...


1

This is a recipe that I used a long time ago on I think a raspberry pi that had a 3 TB disk attached to it. I have a MacBook pro and when it is connected to a power supply it does the backup even when it is closed. It worked for months until the hard drive died. I should say that I have not tested this with Mavericks, but I can not think of changes that ...


1

You can make an efficient copy of the Time Machine volume by using Disk Utility and making a disk image of the original volume. Store that image on the temporary storage / other drive as a single file. Once you've erased the original drive and partitioned it as you wish, then use Disk Utility to reverse the operation and restore the image to the new ...


1

That should be no problem - see http://support.apple.com/kb/HT5096 Edit - copy the entire Backups.backupdb folder, reformat the drive as Mac OS Extended (Journaled) with a GUID partition, copy it back.


0

If none of the other backup options work, I would recommend trying the dd command as described here. The benefit of this command is that it brute force clones your hard drive and continues running even if it encounters corrupt sections on your disk (depending on the settings you use, as described in the link and in the comments there). I think you might be ...


0

I have several suggestions that I'll put into two different posts. Here's the first one: This seems to help with practically everything, so why not try it. Open your Disk Utility app, and after selecting your main hard drive (or partition), follow the steps in the picture below. This operation will attempt to find and repair any disk and disk-permission ...


4

No - Time Machine will not preserve the encryption of the source disk since it reads the files in an unencrypted manner just like any other process once you log in to the Mac. You would need to ensure that all Time Machine destinations are also encrypted to properly secure your data both on the main computer as well as have it encrypted on the Time Machine ...


1

Mavericks does encrypt backups. From Apple: The best way to keep your backups secure is to encrypt your backup disk. Encryption is available for Time Capsule, disks attached to another Mac on your network, and disks partitioned with the GPT partition scheme and attached directly to your Mac. If you want to change from unencrypted to encypted ...


0

The biggest issue here is that you need to run your analysis tools as root. If you don't do this, you'll only see the files that your account has access to, and so you won't see everything that is taking up space. I like GrandPerspective personally. If it's in your Applications folder, the command to run it as root looks like this: sudo ...


0

I found this to work: http://www.readynas.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=71&t=60831 $ cd /Volumes/ReadyNAS-1/ $ rm -rf macbook.sparsebundle It took a while to delete 300 GB but worked, diskspace increased!


2

I've had experience with this, and it does work with some fiddling, but it doesn't "just work" in the mac sense. Every now and then, you'll find that you have to reconnect the volume, restart a daemon, or else face weird time machine errors. If you're okay with being this "hands on", you'll need to install Netatalk (AFP daemon) and Avahi (Bonjour daemon) on ...


1

Your backups are being encrypted, as you can see in the second screenshot (2,57 TB of 3 TB available, encrypted). Time Capsule doesn't encrypt the whole drive, instead it creates an encrypted .sparsebundle file, which contains the computer's Time Machine backups. One of these files is created for each computer you back up. If the whole drive was encrypted, ...


2

Just open /Applications/Time Machine.app


-2

Yes use terminal to unhide hidden files and then you will be able to locate that particular file in TM backup.


0

Rest assured that Time Machine is backing up your dot-files! You just can't see them by default in Finder. In order to restore a hidden file like .zshrc you first need to turn off file hiding in finder. You can do this by opening a Terminal window and entering: defaults write com.apple.finder AppleShowAllFiles TRUE killall Finder Now enter Time Machine ...


1

It looks like the files I want are stored in \~Library\Preferences under each stack's specific plist file. I don't quite understand why none of them transferred over from the original backup, but I am hopeful they will copy over when I visit the Time Machine backup.


2

Your iMac has only a single disk in it, and that is the one you will be backing up. You cannot use the same disk to back up to. You need to get an external device to hold the backup data: either an external disk (that connects to your iMac via USB, FireWire, or Thunderbolt), or an Apple Time Capsule appliance (which also acts as a wireless network router). ...


3

This answer you provided in the chat above is important: Music, Pictures and Movie of my user account haven't restored. No, I didn't find those folders on the time machine disk. If those folders are not present on the Time Machine disk as you indicate above, then they weren't being backed up by Time Machine. You have lost this data and there is no way ...


0

This error was resolved for me by doing this on the original mac I formatted the drive with. I have two macbooks and I was using my second one to re-partition which caused the error. Going back to the macbook I formatted it on, let me re-partition without issue. I don't know any other fix to this or if the other methods work.


0

This is not a substantial answer, maybe treat it as complementary to the first answer. I should expect Time Machine over AFP to be relatively reliable with a LAN, relatively unreliable or impossible when limited to a WAN (wide area network). In the Time Machine Network Interface Specification (TMNIS): Time Machine Server Requirements. I guess that whilst ...


2

Synology does have this walk-through for doing what you want to do. I will mention that (quite some time ago) I used a Synology NAS as a time-machine target disk, and I did get it to work, but found it to be highly error-prone. Not what you want in a backup. Also slow. I'm using a drive with a direct USB3 connection now and am much, much happier with that.


1

The new router (the hardware did change) is obviously using one of the default 192.* ranges instead of the 10.* range the old router was using. Your iMac and NAS picked up an address in the new IP range, (that's why the iMac could 'see' the NAS,) but because the IP in the NAT changed, Time Machine failed. When you change routers in the future, you should ...


1

If you believe your Mac has a virus or any kind of malware you should clean your Mac using a piece of software designed to remove malware. Time Machine isn't intended to be used to remove malware. There is nothing to stop a piece of malware from infecting your Time Machine backups.


0

You can read HFS+ disks on Windows by installing Apple's Boot Camp drivers: http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1638


0

You can access an OSX formatted disk using 3d part applications such HFSExplorer or Macdrive


-1

If you have this drive set up as a Time Machine backup, this means that you have formatted it as HFS+, the Mac hard disk format. Windows can not usually read this format. The problem is that if you change the drive to a different format, it will mean that you need to put all the data back on it afterwards (reformatting a drive deletes everything on that ...


2

If you're using Time Machine on the disk, the disk is Mac OS Extended formatted which can't be read by Windows without additional software. You can use the Boot Camp drivers which integrates HFS read/write into Explorer. http://support.apple.com/kb/DL830 Alternatively, you can use HFSExplorer: HFSExplorer is an application that can read ...


3

It's unlikely that this will work - and any software that was updated will probably not understand its settings file (e.g. Mail, Messages and the like). Also, restoring everything would replace system files with Yosemite versions. You could go into Time Machine and pull out documents and content you have created/updated while running Yosemite, and that ...


1

No - Power Nap is extremely selective about what activities it will take on and thus far, no third party hooks or API is provided by Apple to allow someone to easily modify what happens when the OS wakes from a nap. Clearly, someone could reverse engineer things and come along with a solution, but that hasn't happened yet. If they do, we can surely come ...


1

CrashPlan by Code42 supports backing up data between different operating systems running on local computers: Dust off that old computer. It doesn’t even matter which operating system it uses. Install CrashPlan on both computers. Make sure to use the same email address. Your other computers will show up in “Computers” under “Destinations.” Select computer ...


0

You can configure your Dell computer to share a specific directory to a network. There are plenty of articles about sharing files between Windows and Mac. Once sharing is set up, you can configure Time Machine to backup to your Windows computer. I would recommend connecting both computers via an ethernet cable, so that backing up would be faster.


1

Another alternative is to spend < $100US to purchase a external USB HD (Western Digital, Seagate, and LaCie make good drives,) and use Time Machine to back it up. Time Machine is a very handy and reliable method to backup your entire Mac.


0

I have a Syology NAS and was getting the NO-WRITE error when trying to run the fix but i came across this tweaked version that saved my bacon. http://tonylawrence.com/blog/2012/08/11/fixing-corrupted-time-machine-backups/


0

On the Microsoft website there is some information about moving data from a mac to a windows PC: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2636421



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