New answers tagged

1

To restore the latest backup, connect the drive used for Time Machine to the new Mac and run /Applications/Utilities/Migration Assistant.app. There is also a support document from Apple covering this (but it reads some reading between the lines because it covers several use cases as once). To access the backup as a whole, see this answer.


0

My external disk was originally in NTFS format with only one partition. The Disk Utility shows two levels for this disk. It always failed to erase this disk when I directly chose the sub-level with disk name on it. As inspired by seano23's answer, I chose the top-level and selected mac map and extended journal format to erase with. The process is ...


0

It's not Time Machine, or anything It's Spotlight. How? Spotlight Spotlight indexes everything. Even on an external disk. My backup .sparsebundle was > 2 TB. My computer can't handle this. Spotlight would index everything before it showed in finder. Debugging First, to see what was using the disk. Run: sudo lsof | grep /Volumes/<Volume Name> I ...


0

Try to connect the TM Backup drive to your mac and hold the alt/opt key when booting. You should be able to see your time machine drive and boot from it. Once booted you can restore the time machine backup to your new SSD.


2

You must have enabled FileVault, therefore your disk this encrypted, you go to: System preferences / security and privacy / FileVault. if enabled it so you disable, it should take some time why he will decrypt your disk, then restart and everything returns to normal. for more information: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204156


-3

Try to open Terminal (use spotlight) and type sudo rm -Rf (Directory to disk)/*


0

After reading some Apple support threads on this topic, I found a hopeful tip that (for some reason) connecting the TM drive before launching Time Machine System Restore limits you to USB 1 speeds (and thence multi-day time estimates), but attaching it after gives you full USB 2 speed. After suffering through about 1% of a backup estimated at 60+ hours to ...


1

There is no silver bullet to migrate your Mavericks server installation to a brand new machine. It really depends on the acceptable downtime and on the hardware. First some facts: Migrating a server installation or a Time Machine backup of it over a network is not possible Any migration either with the System Assistant or the Migration Assistant has to ...


0

I searched for evaluations like this before purchasing, but not searchingly enough, I guess. Pros Western Digital's own syncing and backup to the NAS software is pretty cool so far. Con After purchasing in January, 2016 with the latest software updates, I experienced glacial Time Machine performance with hours and hours spent preparing backups. Then ...


2

Part of the issue is that low priority I/O now seems to get throttled heavily (or so fs_usage tells me - if you run fs_usage and look for backupd, you can see it getting throttled). So if you have a ton of files, just the time it takes to do the i/o takes forever, even if the files are small (because it performs a bunch more i/o operations around xattrs/etc ...


0

Time Machine will only have access to its own backups. So, anything besides Backups.backupdb will not be touched. Keep in mind though that Time Machine is set to use up the entire drive eventually. Having it shared with outside data may have adverse effects for either storing more of your data outside Backups.backupdb or for Time Machine (depending on ...


0

I've got the same issue, and I've found what looks a solution (not wonderful but it works) format your external HDD and check that you have a real good bandwith (test your usb3) pay attention of your TM settings, here I forgot so much other partitions and disk images that I don't want to back up, it would increase bck time. launch the first backup. ...


3

You will need an external drive formatted Mac OS Extended (Journaled) to use as a Time Machine backup. TM cannot use a NTFS formatted disk as the backup destination. Unfortunately, Time Machine cannot use an NTFS drive as a backup source, either. Time Machine relies on the Mac OS Extended (Journaled) file system on all drives acted on to do its work. (This ...


1

I have realised today, that OS X seems to automatically omit Render Files in the Time Machine Backup. Apparently, Time Machine intentionally doesn't backup certain files/folder. The file /System/Library/CoreServices/backupd.bundle/Contents/Resources/StdExclusions.pl‌​ist includes all absolute paths (globally and for each user) that TimeMachine ignores, as ...


0

Generally speaking, NO, you can't simply 'restore' from a newer version of TM to an older OS. That said, you can access the data. And, if you understand how TimeMachine works at the unix level, you can use the hardlinks created to manually restore what you'd like..


1

This is a tough one to answer. I have seen discussions on MacInTouch.com about just this subject. And if you keep up with news online about such tings you will find that opinions vary from "Chicken Little" to, "nah, don't worry about it on a Mac." The truth likely lives somewhere between the two. Generally viruses of all types have a bit of a harder time ...


1

It would be hard to tell with out looking at the backup. If I was in you situation and I was not sure if the first backup was successful I would wipe that partition and start again (assuming when you say initial backup you mean the first ever!) From my personal experience however when similar things have happened to me during a backup I've had no corruption ...


0

I've found a solution. Just delete the undesired folders. Delete and recreate the "latest" alias to the desired date (folder named by date). Boom! Backup is available from that datetime.


-1

Note that in Time Machine preferences a progress-bar will only shown when automatic backup runs, not when backup is started manually.


0

In versions of OS X from Lion (10.7) and newer with a recovery partition, there is an additional Repair Permissions application utility. This tool is located inside Boot Repair Utilities. Here’s how to access it. Restart OS X and hold down the Command and R keys. You will boot into the Repair Utilities screen. On top, in the Menu Bar click the Utilities ...


2

You can use an external hard disk formatted with HFS+ as a Time Machine target for several Macs without problems. Time Machine itself will make sure that the data is not getting mixed up by using the name of each Mac as part of the path.


2

Yes - Time Machine saves a snapshot of the locally synced files from iCloud so you should be able to recover them even if they are gone from iCloud. Since one Time Machine destination can be connected to many Macs, you could cross share that was as well.


0

For what it's worth, I have this setup running in a few locations with a single NAS, and multiple machines backing up to it. As long as you specify a separate folder, there is no need to create separate partitions. The backups will be completely separated out, and allow you to connect again, authenticate to the folder, and restore from the backups as ...


2

The linked answer doesn't say that Time Machine requires ...Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled).... It only says Time machine requires an Apple specific HFS+ filesystem to store backups and it should be read as the Apple specific HFS+ filesystem. With other words: Time Machine can't backup data directly to NTFS/FAT32 or EXT3/4 volumes.


1

If you make two different partitions in the external HD, you can easily have the two different Time Machine backup in the each partition. You only need to specify the partition to use for the MacBook during the initial Time Machine setup. Then the Mac would know which partition to use for its backup the next time you connect the external HD. The same goes ...


0

Ok - I feel foolish. I found the answer within minutes of posting the question. Here is the answer: https://discussions.apple.com/message/24844922#24844922


1

I also use netatalk/afpd, backing to a USB-mounted drive. If I partition the drive on OSX first (hfsplus, no journaling), then mount it under Linux, chmod & chgrp it to the TimeMachine userID, and share with netatalk, then I get the same error you report (after "preparing backup", error is "Setting security information: Operation not permitted"), and ...


0

Turns out for some reason "Use dynamic global hostname" was checked under System Preferences > Sharing > Edit (computer name). Disabling this made everything a-ok.


2

This is a bad idea on a Time capsule. It is possible, but it will be extremely slow to set up and very slow in use. See Pondini's Time Capsule Q3 You can use Disk Utility to create a custom-size disk image (normal, not sparse) and specify it to be 800GB size, but you have to create that empty 800GB file locally first, then upload it to your Time Capsule. ...



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