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1

You don't need to do this. OS X uses /Users/(username) instead. /home is there for compatibility. This Apple Support Document describes how Mac OS X handles multiple users. Your home folder isn’t actually named “Home.” It’s named with your user name. If your Mac has several users set up, each user has a home folder.


0

I'm afraid you can't. Extending networks only works between Apple products and the Time Capsule does not have a "client mode", as the Airport Express. You could buy a router that can connect wirelessly to your ISP Modem - Router, and connect the TC by an ethernet cable to it, in order to keep using it as a Time Machine destination. You would have to put the ...


0

Unplugging my second display 'solved' the issue. Not ideal, but an adequate solution for me to get into Time Machine quickly on the odd occasion.


3

According to this article you can get OS X to read and write to NTFS, so if you are planning on using the disk for both, then go with NTFS. The one thing you need to check is if Time Machine will write to NTFS. It writes to NAS's which are not using an Apple proprietary file system, so it may work okay, just check before you commit to it. As for partitions, ...


1

Usually the apps like PhotoShop just come across with all the right licenses. However, sometimes you must contact the vendor if they have a draconian DRM policy where they are tied to a specific machine / OS. I'd be very concerned with Adobe if it was a new machine but I've done the upgrade "in place" for Creative Suite at least twice on my MBP 2010. To ...


1

This describes how to clone a drive using Disk Utility. In essence, you mount both drives on your system, select the new drive and choose restore, then select the old drive as the source and make a cup of coffee (500 GiB could take an hour or two, depending on you exact setup).


0

If the interface to Time Machine has you confused, just use Finder and Spotlight. You can browse the snapshots on he backup drive by date and go to your desktop folder to look for the files you need. When files go missing, it's either directory corruption or a failing drive. Consider lowering off the Mac and taking the drive to another mac to see if you ...


0

I'd have taken both machines up to 10.10.4 first using the combo updater - as it specifically includes fixes for Migration Assistant. Then I'd have followed the instructions rather than try it in target disk mode - you need to be running Migration Assistant on both machines, as you must authorise on both. I've successfully migrated two machines in the ...


1

No. Given the scenario you describe (re-install, restore from Time machine backup) the previous Filevault2 password will be gone. Just make sure you did not exclude important files in System Preferences > Time Machine > Options...


1

Here's how you can pull the password out of the Keychain in OS X. pw=$(security find-internet-password -wl mntpt) This presumes the item is stored in the keychain with the name "mntpt" Then you should be able to use your script on the next line: mount -t afp afp://user:$pw@domain.tld/location /Volumes/mntpnt


-2

Time Machine does an incremental backup. Thus it doesn't delete saved filesystem-objects that are changed on the source, but rather adds them up. Time Machine offers an interface that let's you browse through your backup history. You can access it through context-menu of the Time Machine-icon in the menu bar. If it ain't there, you can activate it in the ...


1

There are two Application folders. One is under the root directory and should contain all of your Applications. This is /Applications The other folder is in the User directory, so ~/Applications. ~/ is a shorthand for /Users/<UserName>. That folder is usually empty or has one or two stray Apps in there.


2

If you are not afraid of using Terminal, you can run rsync -a --progress /PATH/TO/Pictures /Volumes/EXTERNAL/Pictures/


-3

I found that link on the web, check on the website the time the information was last modified. I've tried and it is reasonable fast. https://support.apple.com/kb/PH18855?locale=en_US


1

The problem was caused by a corrupt Launch Services cache, and I solved it by executing the following command: sudo find /System/Library/Frameworks -type f -name lsregister -exec {} -kill -seed -r \; The clue was that the segfault was occurring at CSStoreGetUnit + 84 in both processes; a quick Google search leads to a blog entry which suggested cache ...


1

tmutil is a command line utility for "controlling and interacting with Time Machine." Try man tmutil. (I'm on OS X 10.10.4). You can also control/right click on a Time Machine drive in a Finder window or sidebar. If a backup is running you can stop it, if not you can "Back Up Now."


0

Not sure what happened but you should be able to restore your iPhone from within iTunes. Depending on when the backup was made that should have everything that was on your iPhone. If you have no backups in iTunes that work you can check Time Machine for other backups: /Library/Application Support/MobileSync/Backup/ Restore your more recent backup to your ...


0

Well. You reached to the point where all these so called NASes already not work. During development I did a big data transfers to the nas via smb. For 1gb or 10gb it works, but when we speak about 100gb or 10tb smb implementation in OS X will not gonna work. It may be bugs in smb implementation in OS X or smb implementation in your NAS. Or in both. ...


1

I know this is a someway old question/answer, but I'm re-doing this right now in Yosemite and I added a little fancy detail to this configuration: since I'm on Yosemite I've been forced to apply Benjamin's "root instead of sudo" way, it's currently working as expected, but I didn't like having an icon for the snapshot volume, something that you shouldn't ...


0

In theory no it's not a problem but you'd be better off using SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy Cloner to make an identical clone using Target Disk Mode over FireWire or Thunderbolt. Also Apple has a built in app for migrating data via FireWire, Thunderbolt and Ethernet, even Wi-Fi if you want to wait! The migration option is given after a fresh OS install, so if ...


0

Depending on how old the original MBA is compared to the new one, you probably won't be able to do a bare metal restore. What you can do, is do a fresh OS install (if not done already) and "Migrate Your Settings" from the Time Machine Backup.


0

I would try importing the old emails goto mails file menu-> import mailboxes navigate to to the backup device, locate the old backup folder and navigate to users/{ussername}/library/mail/v2/mailboxes and import the mail


2

The only product that I know of that can handle binary files is an open source product called xdelta. I have used it on Linux and it has worked really well. However, there is a caveat and a big one - you must compile the application. This means you are going to have to become familiar with compiling files on OS X. This requires downloading the XCode ...


0

This is a little round-a-bout but, without dropping to Terminal or anything more technical, will let you determine the encrypted state of the volume. Open System Preferences Choose Time Machine Click "Select Disk..." Highlight the current disk listed under Backup Disks Click "Remove Disk" button. This is NOT destructive. You are just un-associating the ...


0

When you don't have the external hard drive hooked up, go System Preferences >> Time Machine, and switch it to OFF. You will still be able to perform backups, it just won't happen automatically. This is the technique that I use, and I don't see notifications.


2

Time Machine backs up all content, excluding data you've excluded in the Time Machine preferences pane, most system caches/temporary files, and any data listed in the /Library/Preferences/com.apple.TimeMachine.plist's ExcludeByPath key. When you restore from a Time Machine backup, all data is as it was when the last backup was performed. A perfect replica, ...


0

Yes, it will create an exact copy of what is on your hard drive at that time, including every little email or conversation stored.


2

The nature of Time Machine is such that it isn't an archival backup, as files deleted from the source drive will eventually disappear from the Time Machine backup set.1 If you have no other backup however, it might come in handy. If the sparsebundle can be repaired, you'd be able to extract files from it. Following the instructions in the first green box of ...


0

As time goes by, you make various edits to a given file, and Time Machine will make progressive backups of that file. Backups continue so long as there is available storage space upon the hard drive. When hard drive space runs out, older file backups are discarded. To perform a restore, one can perform a full system restore, which returns the entirety of ...


0

No you cannot. Apple makes you do a full system backup so they can get all your data saved to their servers. This means all apps and all app data are copied to your computer through iTunes and a list of all your files is sent to Apple secretly every time you plug in the iPhone to your computer. Also it is Apple's marketing policy to make advance users ...


0

I was able to get these files from time machine by accessing the time machine from the terminal. I used the following commands sudo tmutil listbackup this listed all the backup directories, their names contain the date of the backup. then cd <to the backup I wanted> then cp -R <iPhotos backup folder> <Pictures folder> during this ...



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