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0

they can definitely access it (unless you used encrypted files or some non-standard protection).


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You might lose them. According to this thread on Adobe's forums, other users experienced issues with restoring an entire drive from Time Machine. It looks like, from some cursory research, that the plist files or FlexNet folders don't get restored (even if they are present in the backup), and that Adobe's recommendations are to delicense before restoring and ...


1

Just restored my macbook pro late 2011 13" running 10.7 off of nothing more than a time machine backup and it worked fine, even with a blank internal. Remember to format your new drive with disk utility using the mac journaled file system. Make sure your external drive is powered and on before you boot, then press option while booting. Select time ...


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If this is what I believe you are asking: At the top of you OS, you will see a clock with an arrow going round clockwise. Click that, then choose the third option down - 'Enter Time Machine'. Find your backup needed, then press restore. Nick


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You can blow away a corestorage disk partition by booting in Single User Mode... then use this command: WARNING: THIS WILL RUIN ALL DATA ON THE DISK!!! dd in:/dev/zero out:/dev/disk0 After a moment you will see an error that the corestorage volume has come offline unexpectedly (that is because you have destroyed it). You can now type Ctrl-C to stop ...


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Guess I needed to boot while pressing command + R and choose to restore from my hard drive. Though it will down grade me to Mavericks.


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Open the Terminal.app and type sudo du -k | awk '$1 > 500000' | sort -nr, this command will search for all Directories bigger than 500MB and sort them by size. So you should find the Location to your Backups.


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Honestly I would make a clone of your current drive onto an external HD. Then boot from it to make sure it works. Once that is done I would boot from your Mavericks install key (unplug your backup drive!), reformat the drive and install Mavericks. Once that is done boot to the fresh install and do all of your updates so you have the latest version of 10.9. ...


1

Restart your Mac into Recovery Mode by pressing cmd R at startup Launch Terminal from the menubar Utilities/Terminal Enter the following command at the Terminal prompt: defaults write com.apple.DiskUtility DUDebugMenuEnabled 1 Press enter Quit Terminal Start the Disk Utility and enable Show every Partition in the Debug menu After a few seconds ...


1

Troubleshooting Time Machine against a Time Capsule is a very slow process. I like to just get a new USB drive and let Time Machine back up there and you can know if the problem is the Mac or the destination. Doing that will help isolate what is causing the delay. I would also use a second machine to go into the Time Capsule and delete any "in progress" ...


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Go to Time Machine preferences, Ctrl-click on the drive you want to disable, you get a fold out menu with the option to disable the drive.


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Are you running the Yosemite installer directly from the downloaded application? If so that is strange. I would verify that your time machine backup is complete and then use a utility like Diskmaker X to make a bootable Yosemite USB flash drive and boot from that. When you get through the language selection screen you can use Disk Utility (it's in one of ...


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You can easily access to your hidden file by using the Terminal. cd /Volumes/TIME_CAPSULE_DISK_NAME/Backups.backupdb/YOUR_BACKUP/Users/YOUR_NAME ls -la


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While we don't know how large your SD card is, it is likely not big enough to support a backup. The information and link below provides details on how much space to plan for. Answer by sameetandpotatoes just here You probably want to check out this website for the most information, but here is the answer to your question, quoted from the website above: ...


3

There seems to be an issue with Yosemite renaming the computer local host by adding (#) after the computer name. There are other reports of this happening in a thread on MacRumors Forum and I believe a few people have blamed this as a cause of time machine backup failures. I've tried a few of the suggestions in the thread but so far none have worked. I've ...


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When you find the file in Time Machine, you can right-click it and select "Restore xyz to ..." . That lets you choose a destination folder.


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Time Machine handles its own space requirements; it should never need manual intervention. Maybe try something like Disk Drill or Data Rescue


0

If you back up a sparse bundle disk image on one machine and try to open it on another you may get the "no mountable filesystems" error message, especially if the owners' usernames differ between the two machines. My solution was copying the bundle to my local disk and running sudo chown -R MyUserName nonmounting.sparsebundle on it. After that it opened ...


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The preferences file may be corrupted. Follow these steps to delete the preferences file. Note this will not erase any backups you currently have, only reset your Time Machine settings. From Full Reset of Time Machine: On the Time Machine Preferences window, turn Time Machine OFF and be sure a backup is not running (turning Time Machine off won't ...


1

I had the same problem. I don't know whether turning FileVault on was related (this process was suggested during Yosemite installation). However, I retried backup when FileVault finished and it worked that time. Remember that Yosemite installation brings around new 6 GB that will be backed up. So, the preparation of backing up will delay more than usual.


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That Time Machine backup no longer belongs to that computer. You did a clean install & broke the relationship between the two. Time Machine will continue to back up new data to any available space, but it considers the old data doesn't belong to it. You can still use it to manually copy data to the 'new' machine, but "Enter Time Machine" will only go ...


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File in use Error is supposed to prevent a scenario where two apps compete to make changes to the same target, thus resulting in a corrupt file. Most files don't need to be locked, so you can piratically edit a .txt file both TextEdit and TextMate simultaneously. When Time Machine accesses a backup file (.sparebundle), it places a Hold on the file, so a user ...


1

Open that plist from your previous install and look for "SkipPaths". Under that key you should find the exclusion paths you had set on your previous install. For example from my own it looks like this: <key>SkipPaths</key> <array> <string>~alistair/Documents/Virtual Machines</string> ...


1

I had the same problem. At the Apple troubleshooting site, it stated that the initial backup after an upgrade will take a long time. I hit "Back Up Now" before bed, and when I got up in the morning, it had completed the Back Up. After the initial Back Up, it works just fine now!


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Restoring an entire Time Machine backup is certainly possible after cleanly installing Yosemite. Just boot to the Recovery HD and choose restore from backup.


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Have you tried removing the exclusion with the tmutil command? tmutil removeexclusion /Users/andy/atest.sparsebundle


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For hourly backups Timemachine does indeed only keep the "first" backup of the day. This is a "Daily" backup. Backups are automatically deleted after a backup is performed and the storage of old backups is set according to this schedule. Daily backups are deleted after a month except for the first of each week which is a "weekly" backup. Weekly backups ...


1

You can drill down into the Time Machine folder hierarchy just like any other disk... [Time Machine Drive] > Backups.backupd > [Computer name] > Latest - then you're into the old hierarchy as it was on your previous system. if Latest has been overwritten by the new system then you'd have to dig by date or use search.


1

I feel your pain. I spent the past few years on satellite and it was very unpleasant. Your best bet for monitoring and controling your Internet usage is buy LittleSnitch. It will monitor your Mac and tell you every time that it is trying to make a connection, allowing you to allow or deny the request. For some apps (such as email, web browser, etc), you ...


0

I had the same problem and resolved it like this. Unplugged the drive Turned off Time Machine in Pref Rebooted the Mac Plugged the drive back in The Time Machine partition mounted


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Time Machine does not use the internet, but iCloud does. If you use an iPhone or iPad, iCloud will backup the images to iPhoto, and that can use significant bandwidth. Calendar, Mail, Contacts, Messages, Notifications, Twitter, etc all use bandwidth, and all are on by default. iCloud will also backup your documents and data, if you have configured this. If ...


0

OK. Please follow those steps : Open IPhoto 9.5.1 while pressing the "alt" key. Select "New". Name it Iphoto Library 2 for exemple. Press Enter, let IPhoto open. Now, go into your Pictures folder. Find the IPhoto Library. Click right onto it, choose "Show packets". Find the "Masters" Folder. Drag it with your mouse and drop it inside the IPhoto's window. ...


1

That's not possible as far as I know. There aren't any real “hooks” into Time Machine. However, you can do something nearly as good: you can disable the automatic backups that Time Machine does and run it manually instead: #!/bin/sh run_your_command_here run_another_command_here and_so_on tmutil startbackup --block --auto exit 0 Note this bit from ...


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As others said, you cannot use it directly. The only way I found is: Create a virtual disk in VMDK format Mount it using some freeware tool Create a sparsebundle in the VMDK Configure TimeMachine to use that VMDK Note that the intermediate VMDK is needed to prevent OSX from unmounting the sparsebundle (expect that behaviour if you mount a sparsebundle ...


0

Try using cmd + R during startup and booting to the Recovery HD. Booting to Recovery HD. Open up DiskUtility from the menu and you should be able to access the drives and re-partition them and restore the OS again.


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You can create a bootable Mavericks USB flash drive or DVD on your Macbook Pro (the 10.9) machine using the steps in this Apple note You can then boot your iMac off this media and install 10.9 You can connect the iMac to your Time Machine backup (e.g. plug the disk in or attack via network) and during the install tell the install to get data from the Time ...


1

You will need to at least buy the upgrade to Snow leopard (10.6). From that you may perform an in place upgrade to 10.9. You may want to be sure your device supports 10.9, it has to be 2007 or later, in general. I don't think that importing Time Machine from a newer to old version will work.


0

You can take a look at python-onedrive. It takes a little work to setup but it works for the most part. I have used it with folder actions and launch agents to auto upload files when put in certain folders places within my mac.


0

An excellent question. There may be a file on your backup drive called .com.apple.timemachine.donotpresent. Remove it, if it's there, and that should solve your problem. The file is invisible, so you'll have to use Terminal's rm to remove it. However, with SMB, Time Machine doesn't support it natively, so you may have to run this command in Terminal for the ...


1

Yes, it's essentially a case of just copying over, but with some caveats. Must be GUID/MacOS Extended, Journalled; with Ownership on. Then... Switch off Time Machine Copy Data Select new drive & switch back on. Full guide at Time Machine: How to transfer backups from the current backup drive to a new backup drive


2

You can specify folders to be excluded from your Time Machine backup, specifically, you could specify everything BUT your specific files. You can access this by going to system preferences > time machine > options. For example, I have an SD card that's always in my MacBook Air missing from my time machine backup, because I prefer to keep that separated. So ...


-1

In practice, it keeps on crashing my backups, and I have to delete them so often, that I would advise NOT to buy one....


0

Yes, you should have no problem doing that. Simply tell Time Machine to backup to that drive, and Time Machine with create a new folder in the backups.db folder on your external drive. As far as Time Machine is concerned, your new backup will be as if it is from a different computer, even if you're using the same MacBook Pro with a new hard drive. Time ...


1

It turns out my particular problem wasn't covered by other, similar cases, so I'm going to post my own answer describing the actual issue I had, and the solution I found to it. In my case it appears that somehow my last "complete" Time Machine backup was in fact corrupted somehow; when I looked inside it I found that the contents of my user folder were ...


1

All keychain files on the system get backed up to Time Machine. They are of course each encrypted by different keys for different users so once you restore them, you may or may not be able to get into them as long as you remember the appropriate passwords. Do note that when you reset the password of an account using admin tools (or bringing the keychain to ...


0

The Airport Utility.app and the Time Capsule utilize separate application and firmware versions. Airport Utlility.app is updated via Software Update on your Mac. As grgarside mentioned above, when you launch Airport Utility.app and connect to a Airport Extreme, Airport Express, or Time Capsule, it automatically checks to see if it is running the latest ...


0

Unfortunately, Time Capsule won't back up your Windows partition. You'd have to do that separately. I'd suggest using a program like Crashplan to backup your entire Windows hard drive to an external HDD (free with Crashplan). Then format and/or restore you Mac OS X hard drive from Time Capsule without changing the partitions, and finally format and/or ...



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