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6

I have the same model of Macbook which was showing the same issues. After replacing the Harddrive with an SSD I still had the same issue. It ended up being the SATA cable connecting the hard drive to the logic board. Over some time the insulation had started to wear off and the cable was occasionally shorting against the base of the case causing IO errors. ...


4

I also believe Time Machine's GUI is not able to do that. But if you feel like fiddling in CLI from terminal, and do some basic scripting, it can be done quite easily using the tmutil command: tmutil addexclusion and tmutil removeexclusion would allow to change your exclusion list by script whenever you want. tmutil startbackup -destination would allow to ...


3

The Mail.app stores all Messages in your User Directory: ~/Library/Mail/ Depending on your OS Version there is a Subfolder, f.e. "V3" for 10.11 and "V2" for 10.10., containing Subfolders for each Mailbox. The Library Folder is usually hidden, but you can access it in the Finder from the Menu "Go to" > "Go to Folder" (or CMD+SHIFT+G) and typing in the ...


3

I believe this is beyond the intent and capability of Time Machine which is to provide simple backup for most users. Your more advanced needs will be better served by something like Carbon Copy Cloner.


3

I have the same MacBook Pro. I did the following : I bought a SSD and replaced the hard drive disk. I installed OS X on the SSD. (240GB - 100$) I inserted 8GB of RAM (replace the two 2GB RAM) ( 2 x 4GB - 50$ ) Then I replaced the SuperDrive with .... the old HDD. You need to buy an adapter (Adapter on Amazon - 30$) Yes it's expensive, but it takes 10 ...


2

There are two ways of having backups encrypted. First, Time Capsule allows for you to encrypt the disk. If you enable this, the disk can only be mounted by the device if you provide it with the password to do so. This encryption is local and thus doesn't address your concern. It does mean that if the disk somehow gets taken out of the TC, it can't be read. ...


2

I would recommend using hdiutil to image the disk. First, run diskutil list in the Terminal to see the identifiers for each disk. You'll want to note the identifier for your Time Machine drive (format is /dev/disk#). Then, in the Terminal, use: /usr/bin/hdiutil create -srcdevice /your/disk/identifier -format UDZO name.dmg Where /your/disk/identifier is ...


2

I use Viscosity as my VPN and by default it disables time machine upon connecting to the VPN. It is pretty much always on so that is why it seemed to be disabled all the time. I was able to fix this by disabling the option to disable time machine when connected to the VPN.


1

I suggest you break it up into two parts: copy the files, then compress them. Apple has the simplest solution to copy files and you can use the Finder to do so; then try the disk compression routine, if you want to go that route. Faced with this situation a few years ago at home, and having similar problems, I realized I was just jumping through hoops. I ...


1

Rebooted the NAS, now it works.


1

This file is where Backblaze stores information about what is stored on their servers and copies of files being uploaded or about to be uploaded. I would exclude this from Time Machine backups, as it will often change and contains nothing you're not already backing up elsewhere.


1

You can actually restore mail messages directly inside Mail. Make the Mail application active, then enter Time Machine via the menulet. Works similar to file recovery in Finder.


1

If I understand your question correctly you try to install OS X on some Windows laptop. Or migrate a VM to bare-metal. Besides the fact that installation of OS X on non-Apple hardware is not covered by the EULA it will not work out-of-the-box! The drivers included in OS X are made for/adapted to Mac hardware and usually don't work with some arbitrary ...


1

If you are an administrator (i.e. have an admin account) on the MacBook Air and are familiar with the command line interface you can use the sudo command to obtain machine-level admin rights. Once you have those rights, you can access the files in that folder. An example of this might be: $ cd ~/Desktop $ mkdir luannsphotos $ sudo cp -R ...


1

You will diagnose that you have a serious disk problem by looking at /var/log/system.log and more specifically with: grep disk /var/log/system.log



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