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12

Time Machine will always keep a backup of the current state of the contents of the source volume. When the backup drive becomes full, it will start removing the oldest backup states to make room. If the contents of a folder have not changed, it will retain all the contents. If the contents of the folder changed over time, it will remove the oldest content ...


11

Roughly speaking, Time Machine deletes files in the same order you do. (The roughly speaking part has to do with it deleting hourly backups even when there are older daily backups, and daily even when there are older weekly backups.) For example, suppose you create a file in January and delete it in July, and TM is backing up all this time. TM will first ...


2

Ages ago it was just 'fdisk', but now Microsoft suggests this: Start/Control Panel/Administrative Tools/Computer Mangement/Storage/Disk Management/Format Ref: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/create-format-hard-disk-partition#create-format-hard-disk-partition=windows-7


2

When backing up to a Time Capsule, it backs up over the network. The first backup will be several hundreds of gigabytes; this takes a while. However, subsequent backups are smaller, since it only transfers files that have changed. Also, if the Time Capsule is not available (eg MacBook taken offsite), then it creates local snapshots and waits for the Time ...


1

Okay so I went ahead with the update anyway and it turns out that Migration Assistant is clever enough to recognise relocated user accounts. In my particular case it recognised them, but provided no option to restore their contents (just the account itself), possibly because my users volume hadn't been recreated at this point. However, after restoration ...


1

Yes - copying any of the folders will use the hard link to make a full copy of that moment in time. The hard links only work on the same filesystem, so you can test things if you are copying to the same volume but most instances where I do this, I'm copying to another volume (compressed disk image or physical/logical volume). In a nutshell - using Finder ...


1

FreeNAS supports the creation of AFP file shares for general use with OS X systems. For Time Machine backups, you need to make sure to specifically enable Time Machine support (Disk Discovery enabled and type set to Time Machine) on a particular AFP share you intend to use. Further clarification: AFP currently supports Unicode file names, POSIX and access ...


1

Yes, you can access the backups after changing the drives out. If you control-click or right-click on the Time Machine app icon, one of the items is "Browse other TIme Machine Disks..." from where you can select your Time Capsule backups. You can also re-associate your new drive to the old backups in Terminal with tmutil so that your backups will continue as ...


1

When you click the time machine icon in the menu bar, hold the option key. The menu will change to "Browse other time machine backups", and you should be able to access the old machine's backup in that manner.


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"... I store all of my virtual machines on a sparsebundle disk image. This is a mounted filesystem that seamlessly breaks up the filesystem into many 8MB files. That level of granularity keeps my TM backups small. For example, I have three individual VMs stored on a single sparsebundle volume. They currently occupy 3012 individual 8MB "bundle" files. The ...


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Personally, I would steer clear of Yosemite for a few more months. Look at all the complaints about it in the App Store review section. I've never seen anything that negative before. Your disk could be failing, but it probably just lost some linked files. I use Scannerz to test my drive periodically because I'm paranoid, even with Time Machine in place. ...


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Double-click the sparse bundle to mount the Time Machine Backups or Backup of <computer name> partition (but don’t select it). That may take a moment. Select the sparse bundle again, and click the Partition tab towards the top of the window. Type the desired size in the space provided, or, in the diagram that appears, drag the lower ...


1

I suppose you could put together a script which runs a diskutil eject command on the specific volume, then schedule it to run at 4:30 PM each day via cronx or another scheduling app. When you go to leave at 5:00 PM, the disk has already been ejected. The drive will always be something like /dev/disk2, so the script only needs to eject the specific volume ...



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