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You will need an external drive formatted Mac OS Extended (Journaled) to use as a Time Machine backup. TM cannot use a NTFS formatted disk as the backup destination. Unfortunately, Time Machine cannot use an NTFS drive as a backup source, either. Time Machine relies on the Mac OS Extended (Journaled) file system on all drives acted on to do its work. (This ...


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Part of the issue is that low priority I/O now seems to get throttled heavily (or so fs_usage tells me - if you run fs_usage and look for backupd, you can see it getting throttled). So if you have a ton of files, just the time it takes to do the i/o takes forever, even if the files are small (because it performs a bunch more i/o operations around xattrs/etc ...


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The linked answer doesn't say that Time Machine requires ...Mac OS Extended (Case-sensitive, Journaled).... It only says Time machine requires an Apple specific HFS+ filesystem to store backups and it should be read as the Apple specific HFS+ filesystem. With other words: Time Machine can't backup data directly to NTFS/FAT32 or EXT3/4 volumes.


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Yes - Time Machine saves a snapshot of the locally synced files from iCloud so you should be able to recover them even if they are gone from iCloud. Since one Time Machine destination can be connected to many Macs, you could cross share that was as well.


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You can use an external hard disk formatted with HFS+ as a Time Machine target for several Macs without problems. Time Machine itself will make sure that the data is not getting mixed up by using the name of each Mac as part of the path.


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You must have enabled FileVault, therefore your disk this encrypted, you go to: System preferences / security and privacy / FileVault. if enabled it so you disable, it should take some time why he will decrypt your disk, then restart and everything returns to normal. for more information: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204156


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To restore the latest backup, connect the drive used for Time Machine to the new Mac and run /Applications/Utilities/Migration Assistant.app. There is also a support document from Apple covering this (but it reads some reading between the lines because it covers several use cases as once). To access the backup as a whole, see this answer.


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It would be hard to tell with out looking at the backup. If I was in you situation and I was not sure if the first backup was successful I would wipe that partition and start again (assuming when you say initial backup you mean the first ever!) From my personal experience however when similar things have happened to me during a backup I've had no corruption ...


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This is a tough one to answer. I have seen discussions on MacInTouch.com about just this subject. And if you keep up with news online about such tings you will find that opinions vary from "Chicken Little" to, "nah, don't worry about it on a Mac." The truth likely lives somewhere between the two. Generally viruses of all types have a bit of a harder time ...


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I have realised today, that OS X seems to automatically omit Render Files in the Time Machine Backup. Apparently, Time Machine intentionally doesn't backup certain files/folder. The file /System/Library/CoreServices/backupd.bundle/Contents/Resources/StdExclusions.pl‌​ist includes all absolute paths (globally and for each user) that TimeMachine ignores, as ...


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There is no silver bullet to migrate your Mavericks server installation to a brand new machine. It really depends on the acceptable downtime and on the hardware. First some facts: Migrating a server installation or a Time Machine backup of it over a network is not possible Any migration either with the System Assistant or the Migration Assistant has to ...


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I also use netatalk/afpd, backing to a USB-mounted drive. If I partition the drive on OSX first (hfsplus, no journaling), then mount it under Linux, chmod & chgrp it to the TimeMachine userID, and share with netatalk, then I get the same error you report (after "preparing backup", error is "Setting security information: Operation not permitted"), and ...


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If you make two different partitions in the external HD, you can easily have the two different Time Machine backup in the each partition. You only need to specify the partition to use for the MacBook during the initial Time Machine setup. Then the Mac would know which partition to use for its backup the next time you connect the external HD. The same goes ...



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