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5

I've had the best results restoring from Time Machine to a freshly formatted drive. I did this for a machine with lots of system modifications, (httpd.conf, ssh_config) and all of these files were restored. When I did that with an OS in place these files were missed. There were no problems when I restored to a clean drive. Everything was restored properly. ...


5

Yes you can repartition without losing data. Using Disk Utility, perform a repair on your drive to make sure the drive is free of errors (even better, use Diskwarrior if you have a copy). Then unmount your drive but don't eject it. Select the drive in the left hand pane, then go to the Partition tab. On the Partition Layout section click on the "+" to create ...


2

The Time Machine menu bar item is located at: /System/Library/CoreServices/Menu Extras/TimeMachine.menu/ The menu bar item uses four PDFs for the four different icon states, in Contents/Resources/: Above icons from OS X 10.10 Yosemite DP2


1

I don't think you need to have one folder per workstation - each backup will be created in a .sparsebundle file, that is mounted by the remote workstation that belongs to it, and used as the backup disk. At home I have a Mac Mini running OS X Server, and I also back up my MacBook Pro and my wife's MacBook Pro to it over WiFi. It works well, and apart from ...


1

It might not be the most user-friendly way, but one possibility would be to locate the backup file in finder (very probably in Backups.backupdb/latest on your TimeMachine drive), navigate to Macintosh HD/Users/[user]/Pictures. Right-click the iPhoto-library, and choose 'show package contents'. Then open the Masters folder, and navigate to the date ...


1

This is completely doable. I recently swapped the 480 GB SSD from my MacBook Pro with a 250 GB SSD from my Mac Pro which was before part of a RAID0 configuration. Long story short, fired up setup, told it to recover from Time Machine and both machines were back in their previous state in no time. Technically, you should be able to just swap the hard drives, ...


1

Time Machine is a Backup Tool, not a File-Management Agent. All it does, is copying new files to the HDD (as a mirror) and all older/deleted files go into a time-stamped archive. If the disk is full, time machine deletes old stuff. I assume you want to manage the data. Nit really "backup". Because you do not copy them, you move them to the disk. I also ...


1

Yes. Reformat and partition the HD. When you unplugged the drive, you severely damaged the directory information on the 'My Passport' partition, rendering it unusable. If there is nothing of value on the drive, this is your best bet. In addition, make sure to reformat with Mac OS Extended (Journaled) selected.


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You can also copy the folder from Finder from /Volumes/<Time Machine volume name>/Backups.backupdb/<Mac name>/. If your backup is on a network volume like a Time Capsule, open the sparse bundle file like /Volumes/Data/Your Mac.sparsebundle/ first. You can also run a command like cp -a /Volumes/Time\ Machine/Backups.backupdb/Your\ ...


1

The reason that everyone always harps on creating a backup before running any kind of partition command is that if something goes wrong, then generally every thing is gone. I have preformed this kind of operation on PC's many times, generally it has gone well, but the two times over the years the process glitched the partition table was destroyed. Once I ...



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