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0

If either your LaCie Thunderbolt Drive offers more than one Thunderbolt port ([https://www.lacie.com/se/products/product.htm?id=10621](like this one)), or you have a native Thunderbolt display, you can "daisy-chain" them: connect one device to your macbook (the one with two Thunderbolt ports, e.g. the drive) connect the other device (e.g. your display) to ...


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So I did the test using the ping command in terminal For Google.com Ping Google.com The result for 2.5 GHz WiFi was: 20 packets transmitted, 19 packets received, 5.0% packet loss round-trip min/avg/max/stddev = 16.295/18.872/30.858/2.935 ms with transmit rate of 130. And for my 5 GHz WiFi: 15 packets transmitted, 15 packets received, 0.0% ...


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You would need a Apple Thunderbolt to FireWire Adapter. You can find it here for $29 Please also read this. Apple's Thunderbolt FireWire adapter can connect to Macs via both ends, but can only be used in one direction.


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I was successful in getting the 3440x1440 resolution back in Yosemite by following the instructions from a discussion on Apple's discussion page. The thread is a good read, to put the instructions in context, but the gist is as such... Disable the kext signature check sudo nvram boot-args=kext-dev-mode=1 Pull in the AppleIntelFramebufferCapri.kext from ...


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There seems to be a solute - see: https://discussions.apple.com/thread/6240037?tstart=0


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With my experience, they work. Make sure to keep instructions so you know where to download the drivers. Since your MacBook does not have a DVD drive, you will have to get the drivers for the adaptor from the manufacturer. If you want to avoid this get the Mac thunderbolt adaptor. Hope this is helpful. Also if you have usb3 look for a usb3 adapter.


2

You're using Apple's RAID which means you need a device which just hosts the discs and then your new laptop will see them and use the existing RAID structure. This rules out NAS. AS these are existing RAID arrays you can't simple merge them together to create a single new RAID. At least, you can't while keeping the data on them. Essentially, in one device ...


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Another option would be to try Bittorrent Sync (http://www.bittorrent.com/sync). I've used it to sync family photos and videos between members of our family across the WAN but there's no reason it won't work for local network. It uses peer-to-peer connections so the data would not be going through a server like it would if you tried to use something like ...


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While not as ubiquitous as rsync, I have in the past used a tool call "mpscp" - http://www.sandia.gov/MPSCP/mpscp_design.htm From Sandia National Labs, it's a file copy tool that runs over SSH that is specially optimized to saturate high-speed networks between close systems (such as copying terabytes of data between two supercomputers at the same site, ...


2

Is this 20Tb packaged in a small number of large files (like video, monster database) or millions of smaller files? If lots of small files I would go with rsync for restartability or a piped tar stream for efficiency (one network connection for the lot, start again from the beginning if it fails) tar -cf - * | ( cd newhome; tar -xf - ) remote folder ...


3

Use rsync and consider using it with rsyncd. If you use rsync without rsyncd, you're stuck using ssh, which means using some kind of encryption. You're probably copying the data from an older machine to a newer machine and the older machine may not have the CPU grunt to encrypt the data for transmission fast enough to keep a gigabit Ethernet link ...


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rsync is a good way to go (scp is pretty much the same with fewer features). You may want to use the -Z option, which will enable zlib compression. Depending on how fast your drives/computer are, it may be faster than sending uncompressed, i.e. if your network link is saturated. You may also want the archive mode option, -a which will preserve symlinks, ...



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