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0

Try this find the InstallESD.dmg inside the Install OS X Mavericks.app should be in the SharedSupport dir and mount it, then find the BaseSystem.dmg inside the mounted OS X InstallESD and mount that. then run the cmd sudo /Volumes/OS\ X\ Base\ System/System/Installation/CDIS/OS\ X\ Installer.app/Contents/MacOS/OS\ X\ Installer /Volumes/OS\ X\ Install\ ...


0

Deleting .DS_Store SHOULD reset the appearance of a folder's content. BTW, the problem with the other answer could be the handling of special characters, which in my guess is space. For example, you have a home directory named "First Last". In find, the result it pipes out would be: /Users/First Last/.DS_Store etc. Try, rm /Users/First Last/.DS_Store ...


1

You can install it using homebrew. Just type the following: brew install figlet If you don't have homebrew installed, you can simply do it by typing: ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)"


1

No need to run a terminal command to do this. Applescript can handle it without the need of a terminal command. set myList to {} tell application "Finder" set fileList to name of files of folder "Applications" of startup disk repeat with currentFile in fileList copy currentFile to the end of myList end repeat end tell choose from list ...


0

An thing on the clipboard is actually an OO-style object which has methods to render itself appropriately in each context. So the reason that your hex dump from PBCOPY is the same even when the object on the clipboard is different is because the text-only renderings are both the same. Just as a file on the clip board will render as its ascii file path in ...


1

If you're just issuing one long-running command that occasionally pops a bell, you could run the command with the output piped to less. This seems to have done the trick for me: annoyingcmd | less -R (The -R flag allows for colors to be displayed)


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You can't normally install command-line software without administrator permissions. Do as it says and run with sudo, and you will be able to proceed. This isn't "forcing" it, it's just elevating your permissions to do something that isn't safe to have accessible to non-administrators, thus requiring sudo.


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Old school way of trying to solve it but can you get a second HD? Format that using Yosemite with Mac OS Extended (Journaled) and copy the files over to the new drive. The new format might make it be recognized and indexed by Finder at that point.


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Sometimes things go wonky in the preferences files and you need to delete them to get things working properly again. Once you restart the app, it will rebuild it's preferences. Try this: Quit Terminal completely and then delete this file: (your home folder)/Library/Preferences/com.apple.Terminal.plist Hopefully that works for you! If you can't see your ...


1

If you are running the default terminal program that shipped with your Mac then the arrow keys should move you left and right on a line or (for the up and down keys) back and forth in the shell history. When you first launch the shell and before you run your program does UP and DOWN scroll through history? If you type anything on the command line (and ...


0

Simply save these lines (first one makes your screen darker, second one brighter) in one Applescript .scpt file each: tell application "System Events" to key code 107 tell application "System Events" to key code 113 and execute them with /usr/bin/osascript /path/to/the/script


0

The 'System keys' don't seem to have a Key Code equivalent, they are actioned below the OS-level. Try Key Codes (freeware)


0

Try this: brew uninstall libogg and then: brew install libogg --universal


0

I finally figured out how to do this by code: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/30336086/make-shift3-produce-not-%C2%A3-on-osx-by-code If you have developer tools, you can compile & run that from the commandline.


1

The simplest and least destructive way to stop processes that run in your user space is to logoff, and logon again. If you kill a process, it can't save any data correctly. Most system processes have good routines to handle this, but that slows things down the next time it starts and can leave things in a state where you need to clean up the mess by hand. ...


0

To clean up your entire hard drive (starting from mount point /), you can use: $ sudo find / "-name" ".DS_Store" -exec rm {} \;


2

Final Solution: Remove the Terminal saved state, located in: ~/Library/Saved Application State/com.apple.Terminal.savedState/* Then, make that folder read-only so that it can't be written to. You can use the clear command to clear your terminal window from within a script. As noted on this other thread, the following commands in sequence will clear ...


0

try history -c and command + k sorry just send the output to /dev/null If you need to view or store the output, then redirect it to a file for later use your_commands > path_to_filename/filename_where_output_is_stored


0

Two issues: You need whitespace between "if[" as well as "[numerical evaluation]” to execute properly. The logical syntax is incorrect. if x; then (and only then) y; else z;fi;done. Else is not necessary, but you can’t declare two identical if statements like so: if x, then y. if x, then z. That makes no logical sense. On the other hand: if x, ...


0

Don't know what you are trying to accomplish here, but doing a test for the exit condition while still being inside the loop isn't really necessary: for ((i=0;i<=100000000;i++)); do echo "Request #$i returned ip-adress" [$((RANDOM%256)).$((RANDOM%256)).$((RANDOM%256)).$((RANDOM%256))] done echo "All ip-adresses have been stored in local hard drive." ...


3

Have a look at this SO thread: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/11246070/cp-parents-option-on-mac cp is available on OS X, but it does not support the --parents option, as I guessed. Instead of using cp --parents, replace it with ditto as mentioned in the SO answer.


0

It is external now: brew tap homebrew/services brew services install, brew services install now work.


3

I found an answer that works perfectly (although it requires temporarily adding a password to your user first): Open the Terminal Type: sudo visudo Enter your user's password (create one if necessary). Change this line FROM: %admin ALL=(ALL) ALL TO: %admin ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL (press 'i' to enter insert mode if you can't edit the text) Write and ...


1

Your command is adding a BOOL true or false. So you needed to declare it as such by adding -bool. Otherwise you are changing to a string. But also with this change you need to relaunch the dock for it to pick up the changes. You can do this by adding a second command. killAll Dock In one command: defaults write com.apple.dock autohide -bool no;killAll ...


0

cd /Applications ls -latrsq (shows all files, including their sizes) rm -rf Application.app If the application name contains spaces, use a \ in each space. Example, Microsoft Word 2011.app would be Microsoft\ Word\ 2011.app


0

cd /Applications This opens the /Applications folder at root. There's no need to use relative paths.


0

airmon-ng is a part of Aircrack-ng and if you want to use the Aircrack-ng software suite in a VM you'll need to provide your own USB Wi-Fi Network Adapter attached directly to the VM since Parallels, VMware Fusion and VirtualBox, only provide a wired Ethernet adapter to the VM.


1

So through JAMF, a very wise man showed me a very simple thing I needed to add to the end of my script: killall cfprefsd Solved the problem entirely. While if you go into System Preferences, it still shows the old screensaver being selected, it works.


1

@grgarside's solution is nice, but it is vulnerable to script injection, which can be a major security issue when this is used to e.g. display log file contents or something similar. This should be safer as it escapes double quotes: #!/bin/bash /usr/bin/osascript -e "display notification \"${*/\"/\\\"}\""


1

You can stop the execution by entering the command break. To make a sound, tput bel should work on most shells. Something like the following example should work: while true do commands... if [[ "$YOUR_VARIABLE" == "value" ]] then tput bel break fi done


0

System terminal: defaults delete com.apple.Terminal iTerm2: defaults delete com.googlecode.iterm2


0

You would either have to wake the computer first, or you'd be locked out if the settings in system preferences disallowed you from such a thing.


3

Users who have administrative privileges on OS X belong to the group admin. There's no straight forward way to list members of a group as OS X uses Open Directory to manage these things and it's a bit convoluted as a result. Here is a shell function that will give you all the members of a group. It was taken from this SuperUser.com Q&A: members () { ...


0

This is likely too localized, but I had the following in my .bash_login (at the very end): stty werase undef bind '"\C-w": backward-kill-word' bind '"\C-j": unix-word-rubout' Commenting out the last line solved the problem, although of course I am missing this functionality now.


1

It's not exact answer for your question, but there is small app in Mac App Store called Go2Shell which adds button to Finder which opens Terminal with path of current folder opened.


2

This worked for me: global thanks on run set thanks to false end run on idle set battStatus to do shell script "pmset -g | grep \\*" if battStatus contains "AC Power" then if thanks is false then say "thank you" set thanks to true end if else set thanks to false end if return 1 end ...


1

Normally, your user folder is located at /Users/johnsmith/. However for the case that you are in Recovery Mode, your user folder is located at /Volumes/Mac/Users/johnsmith/. This is because Recovery Mode is like another operation system started from another disk partition, so the disk partition with your main system appears as a mounted volume (like an ...


0

I find that all I need really is adding this to my `~/.bash_profile`` export CLICOLOR=1


1

defaults write com.apple.Terminal UseCustomIBeamCursor -bool YES


0

I wonder if the command you want is ssh , not shh. Are you trying to connect to another computer? As Doc G points out, your PATH looks fine.


0

A .bashrc file can store and set a number of variables and commands that are executed (run) when you launch bash, which is one of many shells you can use to type commands into the Linux/Unix system. For comparison, if you prefer the shell zsh then you would create a .zshrc file.


0

I assume you've tried Force Quit in Activity Monitor? There are some errant processes now and then in Yosemite, less so as the Betas go on. The information there will of course give you an idea what's going on. If this is Spotlight, you could have it index nothing ... and any of the basic OS X utilities will delete the current index and rebuild a fresh one - ...


-1

I recommend: source /etc/profile This is what Mac uses to set the initial path, and it will put everything back in place excepting the items that you are adding for your user. I do a decent amount of path modification in my ~/.bash_profile, and I've placed this at the top of the file because I was having issues with reloading my profile while I'm working ...


3

There are multiple ways to do this, here are 2. First method: Create a quick script that runs after a double-click. Create a text file, named myScript.command. The '.command' postfix will let Finder know to run it on opening. Add the following as plain text: #!/bin/bash killall -KILL Dock Now the script exists but needs to be executable. To do this you ...


0

Change the file extension from .py to .command. With the .command suffix the file will become associated with Terminal.app. When opened, the file will open with Terminal.app and immediately be run within a new terminal window.


0

If you want to use a shortcut to run an applescript which runs the terminal command. here is a question on superuser with the first answer explaining how to make a shortcut to an applescript. How to Make a Shortcut to Applescript in Automator Make a new service and add your applescript Make a keyboard shortcut using system preferences Keyboard ...


0

I found Automator's "Launch Application" action to be as quick as anything else, and the only way to do this without third party software. BetterTouchTool is a free application that can be used to launch applications using hotkeys. iTerm 2 is a Terminal.app replacement that can be shown/hidden using a hotkey (if it's running).


3

When you run a command in bash (or any other Unix shell), the shell searches for this command in a number of directories. The list of directories is stored in the variable called PATH, paths are separated by :. The command in question extends the already defined $PATH by two additional paths: /usr/local/bin which is the usual place user-provided commands ...


0

Removing the file's extension should cause the file to open in your default terminal application. Alternately, you could select "All Applications" from the "Enable" menu in the "Open With" dialog to enable opening with "Terminal.app" regardless of the file's extension.



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