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4

Use URL encoding to protect the wonky characters in the password. Essentially each character (or byte of UTF-8) can be encoded as a % followed by two hex digits specifying the encoded byte. In your example, \ -> %5C and @ -> %40: mount -t afp afp://adminname:aaaaa%5C%4011111@ServerIPAddress/ShareName /Volumes/TimeMachine This worked in my test.


4

Assuming your command results in a number of PIDs sudo kill $(lsof +D /Applications/appIDontWant.app/ | cut -d " " -f 2) should do the trick.


1

shut down and start the computer again. open the terminal and type echo $ENV_VAR and you should see the value you defined.


2

I suspect that git's location is still cached in /usr/bin (the default location). To check this, type: type git The result will likely be: git is hashed (/usr/bin/git) To fix this, you can simply log out & back in, or clear the hash for git with the following: hash -d git Now, running git should work properly.


0

brew cask uninstall --force This will remove all versions of a Cask.


0

sudo shutdown -r 12:00 As @napcae mentioned, information can be found using man shutdown, but here's another reference: http://www.computerhope.com/unix/ushutdow.htm


4

From man shutdown: -r The system is rebooted at the specified time. [...] time Time is the time at which shutdown will bring the system down and may be the word now (indicating an immediate shutdown) or specify a future time in one of two formats: +number, or yymmddhhmm, where the year, month, and day may be defaulted to the ...


1

MacBook Air running 10.10.1 I got it to work 1 out of 10 times and locked up the machine and had to force reboot each and every other time. iMac running 10.95 I got it to work consistently. It might be a 10.10 thing.


1

The $PATH provides the shell (command line) a list of directories to look at for executables. So, when you type a command in the command line, the shell (the program running in the terminal) will look in the locations listed in your $ PATH for an executable matching the command. The first one it finds, it runs. To see the information type echo $PATH on the ...


1

Unfortunately, the yellow color is actually hardcoded in the source code and cannot be configured in the preferences. Here is the corresponding code snippet where the color is applied: if (isMatch && !bgselected) { aColor = [NSColor colorWithCalibratedRed:1 green:1 blue:0 alpha:1]; } else ... Source: ...


0

How about something like that: $ find ~/Library/Calendars -name "*.ics" | xargs grep -h -e "SUMMARY" -e "DTSTAMP" | sed -E 's/^[A-Z].*:(.*$)/\1/g' | sed -E 's/^([0-9]{4})([0-9]{2})([0-9]{2})T([0-9]{2})([0-9]{2})([0-9]{2}).*$/\1-\2-\3 \4:\5:\6/g' Fist’s Birthday 2014-05-16 05:44:20 Secon’s Birthday 2014-07-26 09:58:49 Third’s Birthday 2014-05-16 05:44:20 ... ...


1

The correct script is #!/bin/bash echo "${1}" ls "${1}" (You can start with #!/bin/sh instead if you prefer.) The syntax of bash and other shells is a bit weird. You might think that $var means “the value of var”, but it doesn't. It means “take the value of var, split it at each whitespace sequence (or more generally, split it according tot he value of ...


0

ftp hostname or ftp://username:password@hostname Now, once connected the 5 most common options are: cd foldername #e.g. cd /downloads/recent get filename #e.g. get thisisthefileiwant.text put filename #e.g. put sendthistotheserver.txt mget filenameregex #e.g mget * to get every file in a directory mput filemameregex #e.g. mput *.txt to ...


0

Chances are, it's just a folder created randomly by some app or another at some point to use as a mount point and it was never deleted. It should be perfectly safe to rm -rf it, especially if it is empty.


0

ftp open ftp://username:password@hostname These are two separate commands. The open command is run within ftp.


1

No you don't, at least not anymore. The possibility mentioned by @jherran involves installing yet another piece of software. If that's ok with you, you can use Hombrew or Macports. Its controversial which one is 'better', so take which one you like. But, since OSX Yosemite (or maybe earlier, not sure), the Command Line Tools can be installed separately, ...


2

You could install both of them using Homebrew: brew install gcc brew install git To install homebrew, you just need this single command: ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)" Anyway, if you want to use git and gcc installed on you system, you don't need to install Xcode, instead you just need to ...


0

I had a similar problem as well, no history recorded. The given solutions didn't work, but at long last I found out that the problem was as simple as a missing .bash_history The solution was to go to /home/[username]/ and add a file .bash_history, so nano .bash_history and then type anything in the file (otherwise it won't be created), exit and save. ...


0

The easiest way to do this over SSH is to use caffeinate -u (available since OS X 10.9 I think) to simulate user activity. Add the flag -t 5 to specify a timeout of 5 seconds (else you'd have to ctrl+c out of caffeinate, it seems).


0

You're using cs6 that uses Java 6 and Yosemite I believe is Java 8. You could try installing java 6 but it isn't supported and neither is DWcs6. Unfortunately that's the way of it. I don't know if you have a creative cloud account. They provide all updates. If not you could try the Java route or another FTP client. :/ Edit:: Correction. I forgot since o have ...


1

I had what appeared to be the EXACT same problem. The issue was with the system immutable flag on CrashPlan.app in my .MobileBackups folder. Actually, it was an old .MobileBackups folder from a Previous System folder that was created during an "Archive and Install" of OS X, so I knew it was nothing I needed. It was completely inactive, but I couldn't delete ...


0

If I understand the question correctly all you need is to get the current directory of the application. Quick looking through SE answers pulls out this: set YourPathVariable to POSIX path of ((path to me as text) & "::")


1

The "ln" command doesn't copy or backup anything it just makes a link to it in a different place. Is that what you were trying to do? If you are trying to create a backup you need to use "rsync", or "cp" to copy the files for a backup.


2

Finder always shows symlinks as aliases. Even though they are actually different, Finder does not show the difference, regarding all symlinks as aliases.


0

There shouldn't be a way to have two identically named files in the /etc folder. Can you do a Get Info on the original and verify the Name & Extension (and that the extension is not hidden, and that there are no spaces at the end of the name)?


0

The best way I have found to change hosts settings is to: 1) Make a duplicate (which you already have done) 2) Move the duplicate to a new location, such as the desktop 3) Make another duplicate on the desktop and rename it "hosts ORIGINAL" so you know it is the original hosts file, in case you need to revert back. 4) Make the changes to "hosts" on the ...


1

Usually only the root user is allowed to modify the file hosts. To do that and fix your hosts file or your /etc folder (depending where you applied your read/write permissions) follow these steps: Throw away your newly created hosts file (but not the old one!) Repair your permissions with Disk Utility. Open Terminal and enter sudo nano /etc/hosts and hit ...


0

Just Change what you want to change on the duplicate, then replace the old hosts file.


0

Try this way: pip uninstall matplotlib pip install matplotlib==1.3.1


2

From the man page for ditto: ditto -c -k --sequesterRsrc --keepParent src_directory archive.zip


3

Solution 1: sed Option -r of GNU sed is -E on the OS X/BSD sed (the one that comes with the OS, /usr/bin/sed). And to get rid of the encoding problem with 's, add export LC_ALL=en_US.UTF-8; export LANG=en_US.UTF-8; to the beginning of the do shell script command (see the question here): set original_text to "string  string  string  $  text1 string  ...


0

If you want ls (and other commands) feeling like on a linux system, you should install homebrew by typing: ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)" In order the ls command to work like you said, after installing homebrew, you need the coreutils package. brew install coreutils After that, you will use ...


0

Just place the -l flag before the other arguments, like this: ls -l *.pdf


0

This is a function of the shell set for the user in /etc/passwd (/etc/master.passwd). Normally you can change this via the chsh command, but iOS7 doesn't have this command. so you need to edit /etc/passwd and /etc/master.passwd (as root) and change the shell for the user mobile to /bin/bash. So it should look like: mobile:*:501:501:Mobile ...


-2

If you are looking for a way to install multiple .pkg files via the command line then take a look at installpkg : http://www.lucid.systems/tools/installpkg


0

I found a (quite easy) way to recover the contents of my HDD. 1) I got myself the MBP from my nephew. 2) Connected it with a FireWire cable to mine. 3) Booted our MBP up in Target Disk Mode (press 'T' when booting up) 4) Our MBP then behaved like any external storage device and the files could copied off just like that. In that way i got all the important ...


2

As you have seen by running ls and rm (and viewing in Finder), the /Users/admin/anaconda folder and its contents are no longer present in the filesystem. locate uses a database that is updated approximately once a week in OS X, so deleting a file/folder and immediately (or even later that day or week) using locate will not reflect its removal. You can ...


2

Unfortunately the answer is negative unless you are willing to switch to GNU command line utilities. OS/X command line tools derive from BSD sources which process command line arguments differently. This all boils down to usage of the library calls like getopt() in the standard C-library. OS/X command line tools use the standard library functions whereas GNU ...


12

In addition to what TJ Luoma said, you can also: Go to the normal login screen, with the list of users. Select one (any, it doesn't matter) with the keyboard. Press ⌥ Option+↩︎ Return. Type >console in the username field, leaving the password blank. Press ↩︎ Return and log in. Unfortunately I haven't had much luck with this—sometimes it just doesn't ...


1

To switch to a console from the desktop just use Terminal.app and maximise it so when you switch to it is the full screen. Note that this is not the same as Single User Mode as you will be logged in as a user, so it is like xterm under Linux. Just note that Linux and OS X are different and will do things different ways e.g. from the Linux console boot you ...


23

I don't think Single User Mode is really what you want. A better idea is to use a console login. To do this, first you have the login window set to show “Name and Password”: Then you can login as ">console" as the username (no password) and get a terminal prompt. It's not very pretty, but it's handy if you need it.


0

As far as I can tell, Apple locks this stuff down pretty hard to the point where it's not reasonably possible. However, considering what you want to do with it, I'm certain that what you're actually wanting is to give write access to the external HDD which can be found in /Volumes/ (after you plug it in). Now, most external HDDs I've used (that are ...


3

See Apple's Mac OS X: How to start up in single-user or verbose mode. On power up hold the 's' key down. You'll enter single-user mode where the interface is via a full screen terminal window (the console). There are caveats, you are essentially root at that point, and yes you could switch user or execute login.


7

What you are looking for is called Single-User mode. Restart the computer, once you hear the start-up chime, hold down Command-S and OS X will load everything but the GUI.


0

I'm using MAC much years, and never needed to use the launchctl command. If mean never, mean in normal usage, of course sometimes needed use it when installing somethings from the macports - for onetime load of startup files or so. I'm wondering, why you need start/stop/restart services with launchctl? Asking because if you not an experienced OS X ...


4

To just list them (for review/verification): find MYFOLDER -type f \( -iname '*.jpg' -o -iname '*.png' -o -iname '*.gif' \) -ls To move them to the Trash: find MYFOLDER -type f \( -iname '*.jpg' -o -iname '*.png' -o -iname '*.gif' \) -exec mv '{}' ~/.Trash/ \; To delete them directly (no way to get them back unless you have a backup): find MYFOLDER ...


0

I had the same problem and I HAVE THE SOLUTION. The problem is that when you install Windows with bootcamp it is creating a Logic Volume Group. What you need to do is delete the Logical Volume Group. Very similar to if you have ever undone a manual fusion drive. Bust out terminal: diskutil coreStorage list Copy the Logical Volume Group ID diskutil ...


3

A very dirty solution ;-) : Enter system_profiler | grep "Media Type: SSD" in Terminal.app. A more detailed approach is system_profiler SPSerialATADataType and you'll get all devices attached to your SATA interfaces with - beyond other informations - the Medium Type which may be Rotational or SSD. By adding -xml > ~/Desktop/MyReport.spx you will get a ...


0

Locate your .bashrc file. Open it and add this line at the bottom: source /etc/bash_completion.d/git


0

To create a stack on the Dock of recently-used apps I solved using Thinkertool (http://www.bresink.com/osx/TinkerTool.html) which allow to enable lot of hidden preferences including the stack of recently-used apps.



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