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From man shutdown: -r The system is rebooted at the specified time. [...] time Time is the time at which shutdown will bring the system down and may be the word now (indicating an immediate shutdown) or specify a future time in one of two formats: +number, or yymmddhhmm, where the year, month, and day may be defaulted to the ...


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You could install both of them using Homebrew: brew install gcc brew install git To install homebrew, you just need this single command: ruby -e "$(curl -fsSL https://raw.githubusercontent.com/Homebrew/install/master/install)" Anyway, if you want to use git and gcc installed on you system, you don't need to install Xcode, instead you just need to ...


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No you don't, at least not anymore. The possibility mentioned by @jherran involves installing yet another piece of software. If that's ok with you, you can use Hombrew or Macports. Its controversial which one is 'better', so take which one you like. But, since OSX Yosemite (or maybe earlier, not sure), the Command Line Tools can be installed separately, ...


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Unfortunately, the yellow color is actually hardcoded in the source code and cannot be configured in the preferences. Here is the corresponding code snippet where the color is applied: if (isMatch && !bgselected) { aColor = [NSColor colorWithCalibratedRed:1 green:1 blue:0 alpha:1]; } else ... Source: ...


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I had what appeared to be the EXACT same problem. The issue was with the system immutable flag on CrashPlan.app in my .MobileBackups folder. Actually, it was an old .MobileBackups folder from a Previous System folder that was created during an "Archive and Install" of OS X, so I knew it was nothing I needed. It was completely inactive, but I couldn't delete ...


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MacBook Air running 10.10.1 I got it to work 1 out of 10 times and locked up the machine and had to force reboot each and every other time. iMac running 10.95 I got it to work consistently. It might be a 10.10 thing.


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The correct script is #!/bin/bash echo "${1}" ls "${1}" (You can start with #!/bin/sh instead if you prefer.) The syntax of bash and other shells is a bit weird. You might think that $var means “the value of var”, but it doesn't. It means “take the value of var, split it at each whitespace sequence (or more generally, split it according tot he value of ...



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