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12

This should help identify what is going on in Johnny's answer, as well as answer the question of why this works on Linux but not Mac. The problem lies in the fact that Mac OS X uses bsdtar, whereas most Linux systems use gnutar. You can install gnutar on a Mac with Homebrew, using brew install gnu-tar, which will symlink gnutar into /usr/local/bin as gtar. ...


6

Turns out the OS X tar utility was the correct one! There was indeed an error in the archive. This email thread discusses it in more detail, but the problem is that there is a duplicate file in the archive. The SCIP guys are fixing the archive as I type this. [edit] The newly updated scip-3.2.0.tgz is now extracting just fine! The SHA-1 hash of the new tgz ...


6

The existence of a duplicate file in the archive should not make it invalid or unable to be extracted on OSX, as by default, tar overwrites duplicates. So, I'm a little confused by the behavior in your Gist - OSX tar allows for duplicate files in an archive (a throwback to its original purpose as a tape archive utility, so it allows files to be appended to ...


6

Rather than spending your time with Folder Actions (which I, and many others, have found to be unreliable), might I suggest that you give Hazel a try? http://www.noodlesoft.com Disclaimers: I'm going to start off by telling you it isn't free (it's US$28), but if you like automation, this is the place to start. There is a free 14-day trial. I am completely ...


5

Same error here (tried GNU tar and the one included in OS X). You are missing the xz compression program which tar tries to use. Either install a precompiled xz from Sourceforge or, if you are like me, download the source from http://tukaani.org/xz/ and compile it yourself: $ ./configure $ make $ sudo make install (Unless told otherwise, ./configure ...


5

Before Mac OS X, the Mac OS used ‘forked’ files, which have two components: a data fork and a resource fork. The Mac OS Standard (HFS) and Mac OS Extended (HFS Plus) disk formats support forked files. When you move these types of files to other disk formats, the resource fork can be lost. With Mac OS X, there is a mechanism called “AppleDouble” that allows ...


4

Try: on adding folder items to theFolder after receiving theAddedItems set myList to {} repeat with x in theAddedItems set end of myList to quoted form of x's POSIX path & space end repeat set myList to text 1 thru -2 of (myList as text) do shell script "tar cvf " & myList & " | gzip -9 - > ~/Desktop/files.tar.gz" ...


3

… can I tell it not to create these files? The proposed cron job As your file server serves multiple users, the short answer is: you should allow and not schedule removal of ._ files. For a file service that is without support for things such as extended attributes: File service If you configure the server to prevent creation of ._ files: ...


2

Chances are that it is not a pure ISO image so tar may not recognize it. I have tested tar on some random ISO images and it could handle them all, so it's likely specific to that particular image. Note that hdiutil can create non-ISO CDR images so you would have to explicitly tell it to use the ISO format (note that the ISO format is somewhat restrictive, so ...


2

Time Machine would probably be easier and or better then using tar as there is no mention in the man page that it will preserve resource forks and HFS meta-data information. *See Edit below. ditto does and more... From it's man page: ditto will preserve resource forks and HFS meta-data information when copying unless instructed other- wise using ...


1

There's also a command hdiutil which can be used to make a single dmg file from a directory, and the HFS flags are all preserved.


1

This is a documented bug: https://code.google.com/p/chromium/issues/detail?id=83084 Look for a nightly build or update to potentially address this or perhaps choosing another browser. Hat tip to jaume for the comment alerting us to the specific issue being tracked.


1

There may be too many NUL blocks at the end of the tar file, so that the tar command prematurely finishes its executions (and closes its standard input) after having received two NUL blocks while the gunzip command is still trying to write to the pipe that now has no reader anymore (which raises an EPIPEerror message with error number 32 for a broken pipe; ...


1

@LauriRanta answered the question by giving two solutions. The first solution is to use COPYFILE_DISABLE=1 tar -cf directory.tar directory each time you want to tar a directory without the hidden files. Her 2nd solution however - and also the one I was looking for - shows how to automate the whole lot by using an alias. If you don't know what an alias is ...



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