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50

It's not part of the Apple system to 'cut' files. The option is there and becomes enabled when text is selected. But not files. Here is an in-depth discussion on Apples discussion forum. To move a file, open two finder windows and drag the file from one window to another. This is the 'Apple' way. Drag and drop. "Command + C" then "Option + Command + ...


40

There is now a blog entry about Taking Screenshots in a Snap. It's built into Mac OS. ⌘+⇧+3 captures the whole screen ⌘+⇧+4 captures a custom rectangle (click and drag over the screen region you want to capture) ⌘+⇧+4 then space captures a specific window (move the mouse cursor over the desired window, then click) Press esc to ...


25

Command ⌘ + Option + Esc opens the "Force Quit Application" dialog, which lets you select and kill running applications. If that does not work, Command ⌘ + Option + Shift + Esc held down for 5 seconds kills the foremost application.


24

Download and use RightZoom. It overrides your green plus (zoom) button and works like Windows maximize. You can add it to your login items in your user account to run every time you start OS X.


18

My terminal colors how to do it setup terminalcolours Follow this blog post's instructions to get proper color support in Terminal. download theme from here: http://media.tannern.com/stackoverflow/Tanner%202.terminal import into Terminal After installing SIMBL and the correct terminalcolors you can import my terminal theme from the Terminal ...


17

The cut function is implemented in Lion and later as a result of modifying the paste command. If you mark the files with copy as usual, but instead hold down the ⌥ key in addition to the normal past command - it retroactively cuts the original files as well as placing them in the new destination. ⌘+⌥+V = paste + cut in Lion. This makes an ...


15

The Mac OS X native application do not use the X protocol for the rendering, but the Mac specific protocol. So you cannot use ssh X protocol forwarding as you could with a Linux workstation. As you discovered, the reverse is not true, you can install an X server on Mac OS X and have the Linux program appear on your Mac. What you can do is use either Mac ...


15

.dmg files are disk images, similar to an .iso file. You can think of them like a virtual CD. You put it into the CD drive (mount it), and its contents appear on your computer. When used for software downloads, they are simply a way to bundle up files, like in a ZIP archive. Their advantage is that it's possible to customize the design (e.g. Finder window ...


13

"enter" or "return" is, at least in my mind and experience with others, the universal "okay" key. When a dialog pops up, you can smack the enter key for the default action. In the Finder, the default action is file management. The Finder is not a launcher. You have a bunch of files you want to rename, or move, or whatever. What percentage of files do ...


12

Command + Z check Edit menu if you are unsure if the shortcut is available for a program or a scenario. On a side note, Command works as the default shortcut key on Mac OS X where Windows' default modifier key is Ctrl This holds for Copy, Paste, Open, etc...


12

So far as I know there isn't a nice automated way to provide the benefits of System Restore as it is implemented on Windows. For all its utility for Windows users, though, System Restore can't be used to backup/restore individual files & whatnot at the whim of the user - that requires a separate backup system. Time Machine on OS X, on the other hand, ...


11

Here's how you can get ⌃ Control+arrow keys to work like you describe. Copy the following property list into ~/Library/KeyBindings/DefaultKeyBinding.dict (you can create the directory if it doesn't already exist): { "^\UF703" = ("moveWordForward:", "moveWordForward:", "moveWordBackward:"); "^$\UF703" = ("moveWordForwardAndModifySelection:", ...


11

You can access the finder via the Dock: When in the terminal, you can open the current directory in the terminal via: open . Here's a finder window. I've created the directory ~/temp like you said. You can also ⌘-click the info icon at the very top to see the path:


9

There is no native way to Cut in Finder. It has always been that way. Why? We don't know. I believe the Cut you're talking about is either standard on an Edit but it will most likely become available when you rename a file. Bottom line is, you can't cut & paste files natively in Mac OS X.


9

geekology.co.za has an informative blog post on how to do this, "Enabling Terminals directory and file color highlighting in Mac OS X". In case it gets moved or deleted, the basics are: Add to your .bashrc or .profile: export CLICOLOR=1 export LSCOLORS=ExFxCxDxBxegedabagacad Save the file. Open a new terminal and use ls ls -l ls -la ls -lah The rest ...


9

Unarchiving is built into OS X. All you have to do to unarchive a file is to open it. You can do that by double clicking, pressing cmd+o (between i and p), or by right-clicking and choosing Open. So, just right-click on the file and select Open to unarchive. Ta-da, no extra software required.


9

One of the easiest ways to do this is to use BetterTouchTool. It will let you bind a keyboard shortcut or a trackpad shortcut to many commands, including maximize window. Once you are in the BTT settings page, do the following: Go to the Keyboard tab on top. On the bottom near Keyboard shortcut, enter in whichever keyboard shortcut you want. For ...


8

BetterTouchTool, if you have a macbook pro which has a multitouch pad (I'm betting you do), it lets you assign thing like Windows style maximise to the very top middle of your touch pad. But you don't have to use it like that, as it has an AeroSnap type feature, where you can just drag a window to the top of the screen and it will truly maximise, also ...


8

So if I am not mistaken the the problem you have with VNC currently is that it is sharing the current Mac user's screen with apps open that you don't want to see on your other computer? Lion introduces the ability to screen share users that are logged in the background. Quoting the text from the link: Enable Screen Sharing and set a VNC password. ...


8

When you press the Fn key, the backspace key (Mis-labeled "Delete") on a mac keyboard functions as the delete key. Therefore, to log onto a windows install which requires Ctrl+Alt+Delete, you would press Ctrl+Alt+Fn+Backspace("Delete"). It's worth noting that this works even on the full wired keyboard, with a separate delete key.


8

It's up to the driver; here are some rules for devices supported by default. It doesn't matter for disks. It doesn't matter for HID devices (mouse/keyboard). It does matter for audio interfaces. You won't have to “reinstall”, but it will be considered a different device so you'll have to choose it again from the list of audio devices.


8

This may seem complicated, although after you've done it a few times and use it regularly you'll have it down. Depending on if you have other windows minimized you may have to tap the left or right arrow keys on the last step to pull up the window you're wanting un-minimized. While holding ⌘ tap tab followed by ← then ↓ twice, then press return ( ...


7

I use an inexpensive app, Cinch from Irradiated Software. Whenever I need to maximize a window, I just drag it from the titlebar to the top of the screen, and Cinch takes care of resizing it for me. If I need to unmaximize, I just move it a little out of its position and it is restored to its previous state. I wish there were some way to do it ...


7

It's standard on Windows and Linux, not OS X. Doesn't mean it "should" be standard on OS X. :-) I think it's simply because that's the way it's always been, since as far back as I remember.. I think even OS 6 had this. I know 7/8/9 definitely had it that way. So I suppose they wanted old users to feel comfortable making the switch to X.


7

Great question. This was one of my first confusions about the Finder when switching to Mac. Here's what I think: On other operating systems, the program menu is contained in the active application window. As such, each window is in essence a full instance of the program. (There's not as much integration with Windows Explorer, as there is with Finder on Mac ...


7

As Sylvian mentioned, you can't run your Mac apps and display them on Linux. The best you can do is VNC. You'll see the whole screen, not just one app. Enable a VNC password in Screen Sharing Preferences: You can then use any VNC client application on Linux.


7

I have assigned this script to ⌘M with FastScripts: try tell application "Finder" to bounds of window of desktop tell application (path to frontmost application as text) set bounds of window 1 to result end tell on error try tell application "System Events" to tell (process 1 where it is frontmost) click (button 1 ...


7

If you want it to behave like Windows, the only real answer is to simply use Windows. I know that sounds flippant, but you cannot use one operating system and expect to be able to pick and choose it's behaviour based on your personal preferences of other systems. The maximise paradigm simply doesn't work on Macs, where the ideal is that the function is to ...


6

Finder doesn't have the smarts to change this - but finder does have a services menu that will allow you to craft a custom automator service that would help automate the process. You can pop up a dialog to get the artist name, store it, import the songs to iTunes and set the Artist (and/or many of the other tags) This is a nice way to learn automator if ...


6

Neither MacOSX nor iOS offer to change the OS theme. If you want to do this, you need to use third party software. What MacOSX does offer, is changing the color profile and calibrate it in System Preferences -> Displays -> Color -> Calibrate. I've played around with different options and found the option "Cool bluish white" to be much easier on the eye:



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