Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

18

Plugging in headphones used to be the quick and dirty way to assure silence (back in the PPC hardware days). Now, the self test startup chime still uses the internal speaker whether or not the headphone jack is in use, but the below trick will work on older macs. It is of use with new macs as long as you don't set your mac to reboot automatically and you ...


14

For Snow Leopard and earlier machines download and install "StartupSound.prefPane" which will install a preference pane in system settings to allow you to adjust the startup volume and disable the startup sound: http://www5e.biglobe.ne.jp/~arcana/StartupSound/BETA/index.en.html Note that the above has mixed results in Lion. For Lion users the following is ...


10

The checkboxes are not for disabling the application launch, but if checked, the application gets hidden as if you were pressing CMD+H. To disable it, select it in the list and click on the Minus-button beneath that list. By that you remove them. You can't just disable them with OS X tools. To see a summary of all LaunchAgents and LaunchDaemons you can use ...


9

I just went through this my self! Your Mac can't find anything to boot from. Or more specifically, it can't find the system folder on your primary boot device. Try booting from your OS X DVD and running Utilities -> Disk Utility to check your boot drive for errors. To boot from your DVD, insert in to Mac, turn off Mac, and hold C while you turn it on. You ...


9

The OS X boot process is chock full of little tasks in parallel and sequence, but it boils down to three major parts: Gray Screen - Hardware governed / POST / EFI / locating a boot image. Apple Logo on Gray Screen - System level OS X processes start. Blue Screen - User level processes starting. Since you haven't gotten to the blue screen - it's not ...


8

Applications and Menu Bar items Most of these can be easily configured in: System Preferences → Users&Groups → Login Items LaunchAgents and LaunchDaemons Some applications are cannot be configured in the System Preferences (e.g. Sophos AV Scanner, HandsOff Firewall,...) It's best to configure them in their own application to assure that ...


8

There are three official places I know of that unwanted items on startup are controlled: 1) Login preferences: if you want to delete an item, make sure you highlight it and then click "-" instead of just unchecking it. If it is unchecked, it will still start, it will just have a hidden windows. 2) "General" - make sure "Close windows when quitting an ...


7

If you want to use a software, you can try Lingon. It allows you to manage (create, edit, delete) all the launchd items on your system. Otherwise, if you want to go by hand, look inside the following folders : /Library/LaunchAgents /Library/LaunchDaemons ~/Library/LaunchAgents


7

Are you sure that it is apache you are seeing running. When you do the ps aux|grep apache You will see one process ( the shell process that is looking for the string apache) A running apache server is not called apache it is called httpd, and you will see multiple instances of this (one parent daemon which in turn spawns workers). The apachectl is ...


6

If it's only necessary to run when the system is booted, just use the Login Items tab of your Accounts preference pane in System preferences. If it's a script, use AppleScript Editor to save it as an application. If it's not an AppleScript script, you can still use AppleScript to run the script like this: do shell script "your script here"


6

I found the answer on AskDifferent's sister site Superuser.com: Snow Leopard resets sound volume whenever I start my computer In Macintosh HD / Library / Preferences / Audio there are two audio setting files. Delete them. Set your sound to the desired setting. Restart. This solved my issue.


5

I haven't noticed that sound on my MacBook Pro for ages, and today I figured out why. The MBP seems to remember 2 sets of volume settings; both for having-no-headphones-plugged-in, and for having-headphones-plugged-in. I usually have my external speakers plugged in-when I'm at home, and when I'm travelling/way from home obviously I don't. At some point in ...


5

The manual method (Lingon in Studer's question is a great GUI for this) is to unload the job from launchd: Run sudo launchctl stop com.jungledisk.workgroupservice to tell launchd to stop running the job but it's important to note the job will just come back the next time you restart. You can then try and track down the file in /Library/LaunchAgents, ...


5

This probably doesn't answer the mail question but here is some more info on the startup files. Are you searching for the files in Finder? Make sure that you are searching from a terminal and using ls -A so that hidden files (files beginning with a '.') show up. The following is from the Bash Reference Guide. It describes the startup files that are ...


5

Take a look at the /Library/StartupItems folder and the ~/Library/StartupItems folder if you have one. Also look at /Library/LaunchDaemons, /Library/LaunchAgents, and ~/Library/LaunchAgents (if you've got that folder). You should be able to figure out what the StartupItems do by name, but Google them if you're curious. You can figure out exactly what the ...


5

I'm not sure this is possible by default without holding down the ⌥ key at startup. You can make the Boot Camp partition always boot by selecting it in System Preferences → Startup Disk, but it sounds like this isn't what you want. However, if you're not adverse to installing additional software, I think rEFIt may do what you need. The section on Getting ...


5

ZTE (Zhongxing Telecommunication Equipment Corporation) is a manufacturer of USB mobile internet access devices. PPPMonitord.app is a companion application that belongs to such "surf stick". Often these devices are sold by mobile carriers such as Vodafone, AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, etcetera.


4

That particular line (You have mail) isn't actually part of bash's startup but an alert that your local account on your computer has received mail for some reason. You can use mail to read and delete the message or just delete the message (most likely a bounce back or something from development) from /var/mail/username


4

Don't forget Loginhooks. Although they run as root, you ought to be able to have it execute a $HOME/.loginhook script using something like this: #!/bin/sh home=`eval echo ~$user` if [ -x "$home/.loginhook" ]; then logger -t $0 "executing .loginhook of user $user" su - $user -c "$home/.loginhook" fi Then just add whatever commands you want to ...


4

I've run for 3 years with no more than 10GB ever free on my 160GB disk, and quite frequently as low as 500MB free. Things seem to work just fine. Aperture complains loudly if there's less than about 1GB free: I think that would be a sensible minimum to stick to. Your system swap file does get recovered without a reboot -- if memory usage drops enough. I ...


4

What you may want to look into is the hibernate mode that your mac uses. You should read the man page for 'pmset' for further details ('man pmset' from a terminal window) and be sure you understand what it means. By default on non-portable macs, the sleep mode keeps memory powered on while most of the machine sleeps. This way it only takes a couple of ...


4

The first thing I would do would be to use target mode to see if the internal drive mounts and if so, back up the data. Then I would run Disk Utility on it, either while it's connected via target mode or by booting from the OS DVD. Any further steps would depend on the results of these.


4

I think there's a couple of options. You could use a launchd script with a WatchPaths property that triggers on those directories. You can also use the command-line tool lsof to list open files of a process. You can inspect open files per-process using Activity Monitor. If you click on the process and click "Inspect", it should bring up additional ...


4

When I'm curious about things like this, I immediately turn to fseventer. It is essentially a GUI for fs_usage, and simply presents a list of files as they're being modified/created/deleted. In the default tree view mode, you good a nice hierarchy of files modified and their paths. In tree view, you can hover over a file or directory with a red (i) icon over ...


4

You can turn it off by logging in once as the root user. Root's disabled by default, but here's how to enable it and log in as root: Steps taken from here: http://www.dreness.com/blog/?p=231 In Finder, choose Go –> Go to Folder... (or shift command g), and enter /System/Library/CoreServices In the CoreServices folder, open Directory Utility. From the ...


4

rEFIt rEFIt is a boot menu and maintenance toolkit for EFI-based machines like the Intel Macs. You can use it to boot multiple operating systems easily, including triple-boot setups with Boot Camp. It also provides an easy way to enter and explore the EFI pre-boot environment. rEFIt allows you to sync partition tables customize: set default to ...


4

All login items are can be found under System Preferences → Users & Groups → User → Login Items which you have correctly noticed. If you want to disable a startup item you have to remove it. The checkboxes are merely for hiding. Note: Some applications need their auto-login option to be disabled in their applications' preferences. ...


4

I'd say this is almost certainly a hardware issue. Likely something internal to the drive (if it sounds like it spins up normally, probably some part of the onboard electronics), the hard drive cable or the SATA controller on the logic board. I'd advise taking it in to an Apple store if you can (especially if it's under warranty), but if you want to try it ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible