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25

You can use StartSound.PrefPane which basically just sets the volume to 0 when you shutdown and then turns it back up after login.


18

Plugging in headphones used to be the quick and dirty way to assure silence (back in the PPC hardware days). Now, the self test startup chime still uses the internal speaker whether or not the headphone jack is in use, but the below trick will work on older macs. It is of use with new macs as long as you don't set your mac to reboot automatically and you ...


14

For Snow Leopard and earlier machines download and install "StartupSound.prefPane" which will install a preference pane in system settings to allow you to adjust the startup volume and disable the startup sound: http://www5e.biglobe.ne.jp/~arcana/StartupSound/BETA/index.en.html Note that the above has mixed results in Lion. For Lion users the following is ...


13

There are three official places I know of that unwanted items on startup are controlled: 1) Login preferences: if you want to delete an item, make sure you highlight it and then click "-" instead of just unchecking it. If it is unchecked, it will still start, it will just have a hidden windows. 2) "General" - make sure "Close windows when quitting an ...


11

The checkboxes are not for disabling the application launch, but if checked, the application gets hidden as if you were pressing CMD+H. To disable it, select it in the list and click on the Minus-button beneath that list. By that you remove them. You can't just disable them with OS X tools. To see a summary of all LaunchAgents and LaunchDaemons you can use ...


10

This seems to be exactly what you are looking for: LaunchControl


10

It's not directly that Apple doesn't want you to do so, it's more that older OS versions are lacking the drivers etc. required for hardware which wasn't even known at the time the older OS was released. The most obvious example for this in your case is the Retina display (and the graphics driver required for it), there are probably a lot more parts including ...


9

The OS X boot process is chock full of little tasks in parallel and sequence, but it boils down to three major parts: Gray Screen - Hardware governed / POST / EFI / locating a boot image. Apple Logo on Gray Screen - System level OS X processes start. Blue Screen - User level processes starting. Since you haven't gotten to the blue screen - it's not ...


9

I just went through this my self! Your Mac can't find anything to boot from. Or more specifically, it can't find the system folder on your primary boot device. Try booting from your OS X DVD and running Utilities -> Disk Utility to check your boot drive for errors. To boot from your DVD, insert in to Mac, turn off Mac, and hold C while you turn it on. You ...


8

Did you by any chance install the NTFS-3G driver? It's a known bug (for quite some time, now). When installed, you can no longer have the Windows partition in the Startup Disk prefpane.


8

Applications and Menu Bar items Most of these can be easily configured in: System Preferences → Users&Groups → Login Items LaunchAgents and LaunchDaemons Some applications are cannot be configured in the System Preferences (e.g. Sophos AV Scanner, HandsOff Firewall,...) It's best to configure them in their own application to assure that ...


7

Are you sure that it is apache you are seeing running. When you do the ps aux|grep apache You will see one process ( the shell process that is looking for the string apache) A running apache server is not called apache it is called httpd, and you will see multiple instances of this (one parent daemon which in turn spawns workers). The apachectl is ...


7

If you want to use a software, you can try Lingon. It allows you to manage (create, edit, delete) all the launchd items on your system. Otherwise, if you want to go by hand, look inside the following folders : /Library/LaunchAgents /Library/LaunchDaemons ~/Library/LaunchAgents


7

Lingon still works. I just used it last week to create a "scheduled task". After I downloaded it I had to use its auto-updater to get the latest version but it works fine.


7

You can disable automiatic login by going into System Preferences, Accounts, then selecting "Login Options" and changing "Automatic login" to "Off":


6

Go to Preferences -> Accounts -> Select your account -> Select the "Login Items" button or tab (not sure what I would call it!) -> Then press the + sign to add a new start up item and select GrowlTunes.


6

If it's only necessary to run when the system is booted, just use the Login Items tab of your Accounts preference pane in System preferences. If it's a script, use AppleScript Editor to save it as an application. If it's not an AppleScript script, you can still use AppleScript to run the script like this: do shell script "your script here"


6

Take a look at the /Library/StartupItems folder and the ~/Library/StartupItems folder if you have one. Also look at /Library/LaunchDaemons, /Library/LaunchAgents, and ~/Library/LaunchAgents (if you've got that folder). You should be able to figure out what the StartupItems do by name, but Google them if you're curious. You can figure out exactly what the ...


6

A folder with a question mark means your Mac can't find the system startup software. Follow the troubleshooting steps in this Apple Support technote: http://support.apple.com/kb/TS2570


6

I found the answer on AskDifferent's sister site Superuser.com: Snow Leopard resets sound volume whenever I start my computer In Macintosh HD / Library / Preferences / Audio there are two audio setting files. Delete them. Set your sound to the desired setting. Restart. This solved my issue.


6

Open terminal, then: sudo launchctl list | grep -i mysql launchctl remove xxx.xxx.mysql Where "xxx.xxx" is included in the output of the first command, for example "org.macports.mysql". The password for the "sudo" command is your own user account's password. True, sudo isn't needed to "list" but because you already gave a sudo password for the first ...


6

Your question isn't (or at least wasn't) very specific. So there are multiple answers you may find helpful when trying to control annoying apps that open at log in: Keyboard shortcut to disable items from starting up while logging in Buttons to click to "officially" remove startup items Places to look to actually remove startup items 1. Keyboard ...


5

Think about it this way, OP. When Snow Leopard was released in 2009, it had no way to know how to "talk" to a 13" MacBook Pro Retina which would be released 4 years later. It doesn't know how to drive the video card, the network card, even the logic board to some extent. You would rightly expect kernel panics and other weirdness. That said, you can still ...


5

ZTE (Zhongxing Telecommunication Equipment Corporation) is a manufacturer of USB mobile internet access devices. PPPMonitord.app is a companion application that belongs to such "surf stick". Often these devices are sold by mobile carriers such as Vodafone, AT&T, T-Mobile, Verizon, etcetera.


5

I'm not sure this is possible by default without holding down the ⌥ key at startup. You can make the Boot Camp partition always boot by selecting it in System Preferences → Startup Disk, but it sounds like this isn't what you want. However, if you're not adverse to installing additional software, I think rEFIt may do what you need. The section on Getting ...


5

This probably doesn't answer the mail question but here is some more info on the startup files. Are you searching for the files in Finder? Make sure that you are searching from a terminal and using ls -A so that hidden files (files beginning with a '.') show up. The following is from the Bash Reference Guide. It describes the startup files that are ...


5

The manual method (Lingon in Studer's question is a great GUI for this) is to unload the job from launchd: Run sudo launchctl stop com.jungledisk.workgroupservice to tell launchd to stop running the job but it's important to note the job will just come back the next time you restart. You can then try and track down the file in /Library/LaunchAgents, ...


5

I haven't noticed that sound on my MacBook Pro for ages, and today I figured out why. The MBP seems to remember 2 sets of volume settings; both for having-no-headphones-plugged-in, and for having-headphones-plugged-in. I usually have my external speakers plugged in-when I'm at home, and when I'm travelling/way from home obviously I don't. At some point in ...



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