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0

From Terminal, type: cd ~/.ssh sudo ssh-add [keyname] This will add the key to your computer for you.


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You could try blocking all outgoing traffic of the application with the firewall (ipfw) or you can edit the hosts file in /etc/hosts to route the update server to localhost (127.0.0.1) I don't know the specific update servers, but that would be not that hard to find out. (for exampple here : update.services.openoffice.org -- so there should be a possible ...


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I am not sure I understand your question fully (please rewrite/clarify it) but if you have VNC on a certain machine A and want to prevent B and C to connect to A without using an ssh tunnel, just block the VNC port (typically 5900) in A's firewall (and open port 22 for ssh).


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/Library/Wallpaper is a symlink to the relevant location on the device. The actual location is /var/stash/Wallpaper.xxxxxx/<iOSdevice> with xxxxxx being a generated string and <iOSdevice> being the type of iOS device (e.g. iPhone). The wallpapers are contained within this folder along with the thumbnails.


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the article currently titled "AirPort Utility 6.x: Set NAT options for your base station or AirPort Time Capsule" and currently available at http://support.apple.com/kb/PH5103 has: To set NAT options, your base station or AirPort Time Capsule must be set up to share its Internet connection using DHCP and NAT. Open AirPort Utility, located in the ...


0

No. But its really easy! You should add how to specify the username: http://www.andsotomarket.com/2014/03/How-to-SSH-from-Mac-How-to-SSH-from-Windows-How-to-change-the-user-in-SSH.html I always run into this


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Install an app called "Lock Me Now" from the app store and once it has been installed launch it and from the preferences "check" "Just Lock" under "Lock Type" which does the same thing as the screen saver timing out. Also for ease of use you can assign a keyboard shortcut to simplify the process of locking your Mac (I chose to use Command + L )


1

If others search for how to set environment variables for processes started from a normal graphical login session, you can use /etc/launchd.conf. To for example add /usr/local/bin to the default path, run echo setenv PATH /usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/sbin|sudo tee -a /etc/launchd.conf and restart to apply the changes. Another way to apply the ...


-1

sysctl -w net.inet.tcp.always_keepalive=1 (or net.inet.tcp.always_keepalive=1 in /etc/sysctl.conf)


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If you travel from your office to your home, your MacBook will be disconnected from any network. Even if ssh sent a keepalive, it would not be received by the server (because your computer is offline). The best thing you can do: quit your ssh session before traveling, it will at least avoid ssh hangs.


3

The correct file, prior to Mavericks, was ~/.MacOSX/environment.plist. This is no longer supported. In Darwin, and therefore in Mac OS X, the proper place to set these is in /etc/launchd.conf to apply to all processes; if relating to user shells specifically, use the appropriate shell files instead, depending on the shell in question. See the launchd.conf ...


1

I had a similar problem, specifically ~/.bashrc wasn't being sourced when I connected to my machine via SSH. I found that changing a configuration setting for SSHd did the trick. Perhaps your problem also lies with the SSH daemon? Modify the SSH service's configuration file as follows: # /etc/sshd_config PermitUserEnvironment yes Then restart the Remote ...



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