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Your MBR table is messed up. One way to fix this would be to download and use the gdisk command. In a Terminal application window, enter the command sudo gdisk /dev/disk0. If prompted, enter your login password. Next, enter the following commands. (If the line is blank, hit the return key to use the default.) r h 2 3 4 y n n y o w y An example of what ...


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So, just to be clear, you replaced the optical drive in your iMac with an SSD and I am assuming a drive caddy. In the process, you removed the optical drive temperature sensor: When this sensor is absent, the fans will spin up to full speed. This is the "fail safe." So, you are using a software utility to control the fan and essentially override the ...


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If you want better answers, try refining your question. Also, post a comment after my answer, so I will be notified. Question: 1) Recovery HD is visible, which, I could be mistaken, but this shouldn't be visible OR mounted in Disk Utility Answer: In the MBR partition table, the id should be AB and you have AF. In the GPT, the partition type should ...


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I run three ubuntu VM, light garage band or Logic Pro and Safari, FaceTime and Apple productivity apps on the 2015 MacBook - base model, base storage, base RAM. You'll have significant CPU hogs choosing Chrome over Safari (in general), Skype over iMessage and Office over Apple's Apps. Whatever Mac you push with that workload will become thermally ...


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I had this problem with my mid-2009 MBP after upgrading to a Crucial 500GB SSD. With the OS version I was running (I think it was Mountain Lion) it was very bad, beachballing constantly. I upgraded to Yosemite and it got a bit better, working smoothly for 10-20 minutes or so after start-up before starting to beach ball (heat issue??), but it was still ...


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As far as I can see there currently exists no firmware upgrade for the 850 PRO. As for TRIM, it is generally recommended to enable it (OS X does on its stock SSDs). There is now a new tool in OS X that will allow you to easily enable TRIM on non-Apple SSDs: sudo trimforce enable


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Same thing happened with my dead standard 2011 Macbook Pro. Got stuck while booting after the upgrade. Hard rebooted after a few hours. Had to run disk checker but now everything appears to be fine.


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Try this! I got the same problem last week. Boot with "Option/ALT startup". Launch the terminal. Execute: umount -f /Volumes/enter_your_diskname Hope this works!


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If you have bootcamp installed, i would recommend running the Magician tool provided by Samsung there. Works like a charm and much more intuitive than working with the bootable usb drive or a bootable dvd method. The Magician software also checks if you need to do any additional things other than updating the firmware, so it could save you a lot of time. I ...


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I am running Windows 8 on a MacPro with a Apple SSD SM0512F disk. Lately I've received the following error, which seems to be the same as yours (SMART-value AD): I've roamed the net a bit, trying to determine if this is a serious error or just misinterpretation/incompatibility between Windows and the Apple disk (this forum post hints the same), but I am ...


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Since this will be a fairly long answer, I will not be able to finish without saving draft copies. Please do not make edits or otherwise act on this answer until I remove this message. The following steps explain how to install Windows 10 on a hard disk drive (HHD) which replaced the original optical drive. The primary drive is assume to be a solid state ...


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As you write, Apple seems to have undertaken some effort to make replacement of the internal HDD difficult, as described here: For the main 3.5″ SATA hard drive bay in the new 2011 machines, Apple has altered the SATA power connector itself from a standard 4-wire power configuration to a 7-wire configuration. Hard drive temperature control is regulated ...


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The iMac 21.5" Mid 2011 shipped with "500 GB, 1, or 2 TB (7200-rpm SATA) and/or 256 GB (SSD)" Storage and its Hard Drive Interface is "6.0 Gbps Serial ATA (SATA)". So any normal 6.0 Gbps SATA SSD should work. As an example, from Crucial, Apple iMac (21.5 and 27-inch, Mid 2011) compatible upgrades


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Personally, I recommend Intel for SSDs. I'd go with them any day over Samsung. They're great quality and pretty inexpensive. I've been using the Intel 530 Series SSD for about 9 months, without one problem. It was $100 for a 240 GB drive. That one, however, won't fit in your Retina MacBook Pro, it only fits in older ones, such as my Mid-2009 MacBook Pro. You ...


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No, that SSD is not compatible with your MacBook Pro, as the form factor is different. Your Mac takes "blade" SSD, while the one on Amazon is the regular old hard drive-like enclosure. Personally, I recommend Intel for SSDs, I've had great luck with them.


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Yes that drive will work! I have a 2013 MacBook Pro with a very similar SSD that I replaced myself. It's a very straightforward process and shouldn't give you much trouble. I'll assume that you have a 2014 MacBook Pro and not a retina MacBook Pro. The retina MacBook Pro uses "blade" SSD's.


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The Retina MacBooks use a format of SSD that can be replaced, but Apple does not make it especially easy for simple replacement. Rather than the more familiar 2.5" HD format you might be familar with, the Retina use a newer blade style, somewhat similar to memory modules. Your best bet it to look over the ifixit guides, to see what is involved: ...


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I do have a MacBook Pro 13" mid 2012 (no Retina), and I was able to upgrade both RAM (from 4GB to 16GB) and the drive (from the standard Hard Drive to Solid State Drive). I bought the items on Amazon and did it myself, it wasn't difficult at all (and there are tons of tutorials around the web). You must check how old is your Mac: in the newest models you ...


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In the past, Apple doesn't upgrade any storage as a rule. This is HDD/SSD across the board. The only exceptions I've known are: If you have several internal bays and you buy the part (Think Mac Pro with 4 SATA bays or Xserve / Xserve RAID) You are paying for a service repair and they upgrade you for free to a larger drive. You don't ask for it, but Apple ...


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After 4 years of abusing all manner of Apple selected SSD, I can conclusively say that the drives I have used are more reliable than HDD and have exhibited none of the potential drawbacks or cost associated with HDD failure modes in practice. For the first few computers I purchased, I did pay for AppleCare for several reasons. I had decent discounts on it ...


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I can't offer much advice about the SSD in question given the very limited information you've shared about it. However, I suggest you try installing OS X onto a USB key (preferably a fast USB 3 one) or SD Card (slower; don't recommend). It'll make migrating your files to your new SSD easier. Just be careful of the protruding hardware!


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The physical interface(s) or form factor(s) are Apple proprietary. The different SSDs have 6+12/12+16/8+18/7+17 pins. The electrical/logical interface is PCIe 2.0 2x or 4x (everymac.com also mentions SATA for some older MacBook Airs). Several adapters for different MacBook (Air) SSDs are available here. Example: MacBook Air Mid 2013 SSD to PCI-e 4X. Please ...


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Just a point on scratch drives - SSD's are not recommended for scratch (virtual memory) in 2015 for two reasons (there may be more) - SSD's don't enjoy constant overwrite and data swappping and it will reduce the life of an expensive drive. Using a clean partition set aside on an internal Sata drive such as a WD Black (with 64MB on board cache) will be more ...


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Intel 530 Series SSD works perfectly in my mid-2009 MacBook Pro.


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The naming scheme for non-CoreStorage devices/volumes looks like this: (hard-coded) name of the disk device EFI (invisible in non-tweaked Disk Utility) Volume 1 (usually Macintosh HD) Volume 2 (optional) ... (optional further volumes) Recovery HD (invisible) And the naming scheme for CoreStorage devices/volumes looks like this (a Fusion-disk has an ...


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Let's give you another option: Fusion drive 1) backup the 750GB to a time machine/capsule (You are making backups, aren't you??) 2) using the Installation USB you've created, you boot from that, and follow the instructions on the net to create a "custom"/DIY Fusion Drive. (basically open a terminal window, and fuse the two drives using diskutil) 3) then ...


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Just because the hardware is set to remember where the last boot was from and will look back to it at the bext boot, I can recommend you to hold down the C button right after you start up the fully assembled system and then select the SSD again. Also note that the cable that connects the internally placed SSD may be damaged/disconnected somehow or even the ...


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I'm battling the same problem with my Mid 2007 (7.1) iMac running Snow Leopard. Cloned new 2 tb Seagate SATA drive in a external USB enclosure, removed 300gb Hitachi Deskstar internal drive (probably not the original) and installed the "booting when USB" Seagate in the internal mounting. Will not boot either drive, new Seagate as internal and won't boot ...


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I'd use Carbon Copy Cloner. You can select what to copy over & leave the other data behind on the old drive. Change the old drive name to something else, then the new one to what the old was called. Select the new drive as default boot in System Prefs > Startup Disk & reboot. The new drive will be bootable & indistinguishable from the old, ...


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Download the installer to the current system While it downloads, partition the SSD as GPT/OS X Extended Run the installer and install the OS onto the SSD instead of the current boot drive Use Startup Disk preference pane to set the new SSD as the boot volume default - NVRAM points to the SSD for all subsequent boots


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If you boot to the Recovery Drive (restart holding Command and R) you'll get a window with an option to "Re-install MAC OSX". Choose this and then choose your SSD as the target. When installation is complete, go to System Preferences > Hard Disk and select your SSD as the boot drive. Alternatively, you can reboot holding Alt/Option and you will be asked to ...


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In system preferences -> energy saving you can disable putting HDDs to sleep. If that doesn't help my first guess would be a faulty cable or caddy.


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There's a great website for repair guides called: iFixit


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The 900MB speed is realistic, this is achieved on a few of apple's new mac offerings. An external Thunderbolt SSD would not be as fast, the only way to make it the same speed (or possibly faster) is if you have a multidrive thunderbolt enclosure running in something like Raid-0 with SSDs in all slots. The prior enclosure would be rather expensive ...



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