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Unfortunately you may have hardware issues if yours is an "Early 2011" model, many owners have reported symptoms similar to yours with the culprit being failed ball grid array solder on the graphics processor. There's some info here. The article has a link for a utility that will allow you run solely on the integrated Intel HD3000 graphics so at least you'll ...


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I remember reading this article on MacWorld. It has to do with TRIM technology, OS X, and MBP. Your drive may not be fully compatible. Mac Won't Boot - About Yosemite and 3rd Party SSD


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Agree. SSD upgrade will make everything you do on that laptop faster. More memory will only kick in as a boost from time to time. If you do a lot of compiling, all those little include files will hit the SSD sweet spot and you'll feel like you have a new computer.


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I would go with the SSD. First you can check to see how much benefit you would get from upgrading the RAM. You can look at the Activity Monitor.app memory section. The last several versions of Mac OS X have a graph describing "Memory Pressure", which is a way of describing how hard you are pushing the RAM. The OS will naturally try to make use of ALL of the ...


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Flash storage is storage that uses electronically programmable and erasable memory modules with no moving parts. It refers to a very specific implementation of data storage. It can come in different packages though: wrapped in a hard, plastic envelope you slide in to your camera; mounted to a PCB stick with exposed connectors and docked inside your MacPro; ...


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I can speak from experience - I've got a 32GB USB drive, 8GB of which are a Yosemite installer and 24GB of which are normal storage. It works perfectly!


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Hard drive cable failure is almost guaranteed to be your problem. We have a deployment of around 70 2012 13" MBPs for staff members, of which around 10% have had a hard drive cable failure. I had a suspicion you were going to say you had the same model from the symptoms you described. The symptoms on our problem MacBooks are exactly the same as yours with ...


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I may be an Apple cool-aid drinker, but the answer is still yes. I code for a living on a PC but have never personally owned a PC. I am deeply engrained in the Mac experience and every day at work I miss the subtle, simple, and elegant nuances of MAC OS. I've cussed Windows about some thing every day for 14 consecutive years. My Mac experience from a user ...


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I have that same model and have a 240GB SSD from OWC in it. Have had for probably two years. It works very well and since you just need a 3G model you can get one for like $125.00 or so.


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Yes, that drive will work for your Macbook. However, keep in mind that your machine uses a SATA II interface. This means that the maximum throughout is 300 MB/s. Though SATA III drives, such as the one you link to, are backwards compatible, there’s no benefit to spending the extra money. You are better off finding a SATA II SSD. Either way, you will notice a ...


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Yep it'll be compatible, your HDD is a SATA II. But because of the SATA2 limitation (~300MB/s) you won't be able to use your SSD at full speed.


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You can look here[1]. The members of this thread seem to agree that writing 1s (FF) to unused space by the OS allows the GC on the disk to do its job, effectively the same as TRIM. Unfortunately they devolve into insulting each others' knowledge of SSDs and Mac chipsets in general before doing anything useful. One of the commenters claimed there was a ...


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When I purchased my early 2013 MacBook Pro with Retina Display, as well as a previous MacBook Pro seven years earlier, I specifically asked about changing the HDD and RAM in the older one and the SSD in the newer one myself and in both instances I was told that it didn't void the warranty as long as there was no evidence that the work done by myself was the ...


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There's no way a PPC can have any clue what an SSD is, nor any OS or driver that runs on it - they are 10 years apart in architectural terms. I'd be happy enough it recognises the drive at all. I do have to ask, how did you achieve it? SATA to PATA or is it a PCIe card?


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Your first idea is the only way that it can be done. Boot into recovery HD and create a Fusion Drive (erasing all data) Install Mavericks on SSD part of Fusion Drive A Fusion drive is for all intents and purposes a single drive, the OS sees only one Volume. The promise of a Fusion drive is that it will optimize the contents in such a way that you will ...


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Follow these steps Create a USB key for setup with DiskMaker X. Replace HD by SSD (keep HD safe) Boot on USB key newly created. Format SSD with Disk utility (already in the top menu on the USB key) Clean Install on the new SSD!


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From your link… can you upgrade from osx 10.5.8 to OS X Lion Not by using this method. You must be running 10.6.6 Snow Leopard to be able to run Lion by using this method. This method is a redeemable code for the Mac App Store to where the OS will begin to download immediately. To get Snow Leopard, you must purchase it the DVD (search "OS X ...


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The only measurable difference aside from storage space is that the SSD version will be slightly more secure from data loss from the occasional fall. SSDs don't suffer from disk drive failures of scratched disks. But if your not clumsy, that's not a problem. Go with the 1TB drive. 128gb is pitiful in this day and age.


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If you want to put your most-used files on the SSD and the less-frequently-used files on the HDD, you could make your own Fusion Drive. I'm paraphrasing the instructions here: Take a Time Machine backup of everything. THE FUSION DRIVE-MAKING PROCESS WILL WIPE BOTH DRIVES! Make a bootable OS X USB drive. If you can't, that's fine, but doing so will let ...


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Never had a JetDrive, but I wouldn't use cindori's enabler, I'd use Jet's own - There's no data on whether they do it the same way as cindori Take control with JetDrive Toolbox. Exclusively developed by Transcend for JetDrive SSDs, JetDrive Toolbox monitoring software leverages S.M.A.R.T. technology to analyze its health status. Additionally, it ...


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The Trim command helps with “garbage collection” of deleted data, resetting those now-unused blocks to an empty state at the time of file deletion. This allows for better performance for many SSDs, because waiting for the next write operation that requires use of that space to reset the blocks can significantly lower the speed of the write operation. ...


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The TRIM command was introduced to facilitate “garbage collection” of deleted data, allowing the SSD to reset those “unused” blocks back to an “empty” state. This allows for better performance for many SSDs. All Chameleon does is hack your SSD to enable TRIM. What the hack does is basically tell the OS that the non-Apple SSDs in the system are Apple drives ...


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Alright so I waited it out only to come back this morning to see that it was still stuck. I've waited several more hours until 10 am this morning which comes down to a total wait of 18 hours. I went ahead and manually rebooted and it looks like the upgrade was completed successfully after all. Please note that this is not me suggesting you should reboot if ...


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Carbon Copy Cloner - which can also create Recovery partitions - though it does need to get it from somewhere. You can clone your boot drive whilst booted from it, with no issues. Then just swap drives. If you first clone without the Recovery partition option, you then have 2 identical drives to attempt the Internet Recovery on, with a full safety copy. ...


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UPDATE: I bit the bullet and just rebooted by holding down the power button and it seems to have rebooted as normal and I have Yosemite, hopefully with no issues!


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Try and format the disk by using Disk Utility built into the installer (Utility > Disk Utility) then try and reinstall. This should work since 'Macintosh HD' is only a volume and not the actual SSD. I used this method to fix the b-node tree error or whatever it is where I couldn't write to it.


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Simply… Both SSD first - having that for your swapfile will immediately appear to 'speed up' the RAM, just because access times will be much faster. RAM second - as more RAM/less pagefile will be faster still. Rough prices… 500 GB SSD - $200 4GB RAM - $33 Source ...


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Depends on what you're hoping to gain from your upgrade. An SSD will load everything faster, but RAM can keep more stuff open at once. If you find your computer being unbearably slow in literally everything it does, an SSD is the way to go, but if, for example, your computer only starts acting up once you open your "lots of tabs," you'll want the RAM boost. ...


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Go to Crucial.com (or any other similiar site that sells ram and ssds) and check out prices. Ram is a LOT cheaper than getting an ssd. If you can afford both, get both. If you're running Yosemite then 8gb will make a marked difference. If all you're doing is surfing the internet then go through your hard drive and free up a load of space, a cheap usb drive ...


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Just did SSD upgrade on 2012 MBP non retina and it flat flies now. Was gonna do ram but my graph is low mostly it's just HDDs are sooo slow. Love it now!


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Open up activity monitor and check your RAM usage. If it's high pressure (check the graph), or even swapping files, you will benefit from more RAM. Any computer will benefit heavily from installing an SSD. Expect everything to go 10x faster (not kidding). Also, it will make you not having enough RAM less of a problem, as it will speed up your swap. So it ...


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It depends on your budget. If I were you, I would upgrade both RAM and change 512 GB SSD. There is also Super Driver bay to SATA HD adaptor available. You could put your HDD there.


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This could have been a situation where the PRAM somehow lost the startup disk settings. If you reboot holding COMMAND-OPTION-P-R and wait for the startup chime (or two) that will reset the PRAM and might fix the issue. What you did was exactly right, however, as there might have been disk corruption or some other sort of disk problem. Unfortunately disk ...


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Wondering if anyone has tried this: Run your 3rd party SSD on Yosemite with kext enabled and no TRIM and once a week--or as needed-- boot from a bootable Mavericks external and run a TRIM Enabler over night. In the morning, shutdown, remove the bootable external drive and restart with Yosemite.


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If you don't want to use Disk Warrior or something similar to get your volumes back, there is a small chance to recover your partitions manually: You'll need some tools and luck to accomplish that: Install a full vanilla system (Mountain Lion or Mavericks should work) on a thumb drive. A recovery system will not work. Boot to the thumb drive, download and ...


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The problem with the upgrade script is the timing only estimates how long it takes for Apple's software to install. You can (and should) open the log file while upgrading/installing and press Command-3 to show all logs, not just the errors. You can see that during this "about a second" it's really migrating user files and handling all the things you've ...


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You might want to try using internet recovery again, completely erasing the disk using the supplied disk utility. (select the drive (not the partition) and use the delete tab. This will also recreate the partition map accordingly. Also, try using safe boot (hold shift while booing). If that doesn't do the trick boot in verbose mode, which will give you more ...


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Personally I have a samsung pro ssd and trim enabler app didn't help me on enabling the trim support. Chameleon ssd optimizer is the answer and is free. I tried 2 times: the first time didn't work. Make sure before it asks you to restart the trim is enabled. Cancel the restart and wait for the chameleon to disable the trim lock then restart.


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To solve the problems we have to place the HDD on the original place. Then we place the SSD to the SuperDrive place. Just install Yosemite as usual and everything is working now.


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I'm not sure about the former question without getting hands-on but here's a fix... My usual advice - boot your Mac and download the 10.10 installer from Apple. Do not run the installer, cancel it. Next, build a USB installer from the 10.10 installer so you can perform a completely clean install. Take an 8GB USB stick and (very important) name it Untitled. ...


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You'll need to create an image of the Boot Camp partition of the old SSD using Winclone and restore it to the new SSD.


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The primary reason to disable the swapfile isn't speed - it's disk space. If one is a user who routinely runs within 5 GB of a full drive, disabling swap will stop the constant nagging of running out of space; I routinely wind up with a 4+ GB swapfile from routine browsing. The speed improvement is astounding on older machines; it's not that impressive on ...


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http://blog.macsales.com/18244-owc-diys-wont-void-your-macs-warranty The link above states the following: "We address this topic directly with customers via our support portals and are happy to inform you here of the same fact: upgrading your Mac does not void its warranty. This consumer protection is owed to the little known Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of ...


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Update 3: There were a two reasons I wanted the output from diskutil and fdisk. First I wanted to check if rEFIt was installed on its own partition. It is not. This leaves either the EFI partition or the OS X partition. The normal (automatic) installation would be OS X, which is backed up with Time Machine. To be safe, you could backup the EFI partition. ...


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Not a brilliantly helpful answer, but a resolution nonetheless. I contacted OWC's online chat tech support, who were incredibly helpful - continuing the conversation for an hour and a half - and talked me through diagnosing the problem. The tech support rep first suggested using my old boot drive, and from there, testing whether my SSD was writable via the ...


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For all intents and purposes, you can use the flash SSD inside your MacBook exactly like you would use an internal HDD. The noticeable differences are that it is smaller capacity that a typical HDD, but also much, much faster and more power-efficient. The only thing you should avoid are actions that intentionally stress the drive, like read/write speed ...



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