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Is it a viable option? Yes. You could do either of your options given that you are using RAID 1. That said, I am not a fan of software based RAID. It consumes CPU cycles that could otherwise be used somewhere else. Given that SSDs are far more reliable than TSM (traditional spinning media), the chances of a drive failure go down significantly. What ...


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I'd just buy a 1TB SSD & be done with it. The speed difference from even a raided HD will take your breath away. Keep the old HD for extra storage/backup.


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I recommend enabling trim and doing firmware updates! :)


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I went on and opened the Macbook, detached the ventilator fan, cleaned it - there was a thick dust ball underneath it somewhere, returned everything back and voila! Rarely goes over 80C now.


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Apple's SSDs are officially supported in OS X and TRIM feature is enabled by default for them. But for third party SSDs there is native builtin command to enable TRIM support. I followed this tutorial to add and SSD to my MacBook Pro with HD caddy. Although now I realized that I don't use previous HDD day to day. There is no problem for me since I started ...


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OS X 10.11, El Capitan, does not include specific code to prevent the use of a third party Solid State Disk (SSD). I have replaced my MacBook Pro's Hard Disk Drive (HDD) with a Samsung SSD; the MacBook is running OS X 10.11. With regard to TRIM support on non-Apple installed drives, see Should I enable TRIM with a third party (non-Apple) SSD?


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As long as you're on your Wi-Fi network, you should be able to do that, but if I were you I'd just buy a SATA-to-USB cable ($30 at Best Buy), install the SSD as usual, connect the HDD over USB, make a disk image of it with Disk Utility (in Recovery), and then install the image on the new drive. I did this when I upgraded my MacBook Pro to an SSD and haven't ...


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I solved the issue by installing El Capitan on the USB (via another Mac) and booting from there (a full install, not just a boot disk). The El Capitan booted from the USB did see the SSD, so I could install El Capitan from the USB onto the SSD. The core issue was that Apple seems to have added third party SSD support after 10.6, so installing 10.6 was ...


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Software causes Possibly OS X might be booting expecting to have to work with the USB bus and getting confused by the fact it's now over SATA? It in theory should handle that fine, but back in the day that did happen sometimes when making a clean install on a drive over USB and then moving it to SATA. Never had the problem with Cloning an existing drive ...


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The problem was the internal SATA cable. After exchanging it - this is quite an easy operation, there are plenty of videos on Youtube that describe exactly how it's done - the drive booted flawlessly and is running at a negotiated link speed of 6 Gigabit. To make sure an SSD will work with a Macbook, the Link Speed of the SATA controller should be checked ...


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I've ended up answering my own question as follows: I wasn't able to delete files from the Time Machine backup and got the following message: The operation can't be completed because backup items can't be modified I rebooted using Command+R and then tried to restore from Time Machine. I kept getting errors saying the new drive was too small. I then ...


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Had the same problem. Found the SSD connector not made as thick as HDD connector this causes contact problem. Quick fix is to cut two thin pieces of printer paper to use as shims to wedge the contacts together. Make them long enough so you can hold them in place as you insert the cable with the SSD.



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