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2

This approach is quite okay and generally sane. You should verify that Time Machine is still backing up your home directory, following the symlink to the new drive, and not just backing up a reference to your directory.


1

There is no advantage or effect on SSDs with the "Put hard disk to sleep". This setting enabled a spinning disk to spin-down while not in use. With no mechanical moving parts, there is no effect on an SSD. Externally connected mechanical drives will still adhere to the setting. See Apple Support page: OS X: Saving energy with Sleep


0

Upgrading to Yosemite did make things quite a bit better. It's still a bit sluggish sometimes, but overall response times are much better. Also, the spotlight indexing took quite a hit.


-1

Upgrade to SSD first then only come the RAM. There is software to help you enable TRIM support for third party SSD


1

In my experience, an SSD has led to faster load times (a formerly-1:20 boot time became 18 seconds!), but a RAM upgrade has epically increased the stability of the computer (I used to get the beach ball of death on a daily basis, which the SSD did nothing to combat, but I can count how many times I've gotten it since going from 4 to 10 GB a few weeks ago on ...


3

Don't get a 128GB SSD. You don't want to run a 3rd party SSD on OS X without a decent amount of free space since you won't have TRIM support. Does Activity Monitor show memory pressure? If not, I'd save my pennies until I could afford a 256GB or 512GB SSD. I've done both RAM and SSD upgrades many times and an SSD has always been by far the best upgrade in ...


2

Once programs are started they reside in RAM. So if you have enough RAM they will be fast. A fast SSD will be also helpful but usually it is not used much during normal operation if you have large RAM space. I would start with RAM upgrade, since the RAM is acting as SSD but it is faster. Main difference in SSD you will see when starting up the ...


1

If you want to boot up programs faster, i would advice you buy the SSD first. This is the part of your computer that is responsible for booting up programs.


0

Are you booted from another drive or Internet Recovery and, if so, are you able to repartition instead of erase the disk using Disk Utility? Select the drive in the Sidebar Select the "Partition" tab Change the "Partition Layout" to "1 Volume" (or however many volumes you wish the drive to have) Click "Options" and change the partition map to "GUID ...


0

[ON HOLD] Start Terminal and enter following command at the Terminal prompt: diskutil cs list This will give you a list of CoreStorage volumes on your system. Copy the Logical Volume Group (LVG) alphanumeric UUID of your CoreStorage volume. The LVG should be the first UUID listed and it’s the one you want to delete. Next, run the following command: ...


0

Your logic is sound. Just something to keep in mind is that while yes swap is much faster on a SSD, it is still much slower in respect to RAM and both should probably be upgraded. But yes she would see the most improvement by going to a SSD Just as a side note 10.10.1 will try to pre-cache as many things as possible in RAM so apple uses 'memory pressure' to ...


2

Boot into Recovery from the USB. Instead of opening Disk Utility, open Terminal instead. Run the command diskutil list to see that your drive is being recognised. It should list two disks, one being your bootable drive, the other your SSD, and provide you with a disk identifier (such as disk0). If it doesn't show up, check that you have installed it ...


0

It's the "sleep" function that confuses my setup (early Macbook Pro Laptop, OS 10.6.8 running from a newly installed SSD). Thing goes to sleep and it can't wake up (beach ball). Upon restart, can't find System folder. Solution being tested: Disable computer and disc "sleep" capability. Even display. It's in a "burn-in" period now. Leaving it on, doing a ...


0

Probably TimeMachine local snapshots is enabled on your Mac. Local snapshots are basically backup files stored on your local hard-disk (as opposed to regular ones stored on the external TimeMachine volume). This is a useful feature for people who travel a lot, so they can revert files to recent versions even when they are not connected to their home ...


1

This is more than likely a hardware problem with the SSD. Specifically, the SATA input/or SSD controller, based on the following: The problem occurred after swapping the drive out from one machine into another. You have connected the SSD to three different SATA cables (two internal, one external). None have recognized it. This rules out a bad SATA cable. ...


0

You have to make sure the SSD is in the correct format. Go to Disk Utility, and in the Erase tab, select Mac OS Extended (Journaled) as the format and erase the SSD, and then the bootable drive should acknowledge the SSD as a disk on which OS X can be installed. Good luck!


0

I ran into somewhat similar troubles, and discovered that there were many bad blocks on the drive (also from Crucial). Using Disk Utility to do a 1-pass security wipe (choose "Security Options" from the Erase tab in Disk Utility while the drive is selected and ) solved the problem entirely. Do this while started up from another disk (or the Recovery ...


0

If you use CarbonCopyCloner (after reformatting the SSD) it will give the option of moving across the Recovery Partition before moving your 500Gb of data to the new 1Tb partition.


0

The following diskutil cs resizeStack command is vastly undocumented and as such potentially destructive. Please backup your Mac OS X before proceeding. First you have to backup your Recovery HD: Start Terminal.app and enter defaults write com.apple.DiskUtility DUDebugMenuEnabled 1 press enter and quit Terminal.app Start Disk Utility and enable 'Show ...


0

The drive cloner did exactly what it was supposed to do – clone the drive, right down to the original volume's capacity. Try reformatting the SSD with one 1TB partition and then doing a standard Time Machine restore.


0

SSD: If you did install the Trim command, undo that, it will conflict in Yosemite. On a modern SSD it is counterproductive because of timing issues at the file level access. Perhaps it is best to do a OS restore from the Recovery Partition, do not use TimeMachine for this. About Hibernatemode: even if you set it to 0, a sleepimage will be made (size about ...


0

I personally can't tell you about SSD compatibility for MBP, but I went through the same process when I did a HD upgrade on my 2009 MPB. I found numerous reviews on sites like newegg, amazon, bestbuy and so on and many people said they used the drive to upgrade their MBP's. I ended up buying a HD from newegg that said it was for a MBP and it ended up not ...


3

A very dirty solution ;-) : Enter system_profiler | grep "Media Type: SSD" in Terminal.app. A more detailed approach is system_profiler SPSerialATADataType and you'll get all devices attached to your SATA interfaces with - beyond other informations - the Medium Type which may be Rotational or SSD. By adding -xml > ~/Desktop/MyReport.spx you will get a ...


0

I would contact the vendor about the problem. It sounds like you have a bad block in the SSD that the SSD controller doesn't recognize. I read a thread (somewhere...forgot where) where some guys SSD would block at the exact same point every time he tried to do a clone on it. He tried reformatting it and the same problem occurred. He ran Scannerz on it and ...


1

Install the OS on to each of the components of the "DIY Fusion Drive" if the system can install and boot from each, you have ruled out a hardware problem with either of the components.


0

I would recommend you reinstall 10.10 on to the USB drive using following process. First restore your system with the old HD and OS to be able to do this: Connect to your Mac a properly formatted 8GB (or larger) drive, and rename the drive Untitled. (The Terminal command used here assumes the drive is named Untitled.) Also, make sure the Yosemite ...


2

If I understand correctly, you want to backup your iOS devices to a drive other than your Mac's (because they have small SSDs). It is possible to backup multiple Macs to a single Time Capsule. Sadly though, it seems that Time Capsule doesn't support backing up iOS devices (yet. I really do hope this becomes an option soon, and I'm not the only one). Here ...


1

try resetting your PRAM and SMC, this may resolve your issue, http://osxdaily.com/2010/11/15/reset-pram-mac/ http://osxdaily.com/2010/03/24/when-and-how-to-reset-your-mac-system-management-controller-smc/ otherwise it could be bad RAM... take your Macbook in to apple and have them test the RAM.


0

It is OK. It is mainly used to detect tampering/modification of device drivers at the kernel level. You should see Trim's note here http://www.cindori.org/trim-enabler-and-yosemite/ In OS X 10.10 (Yosemite), Apple has introduced a new security requirement called kext signing. (A kext is a kernel extension, or a driver, in Mac OS X) Kext signing ...


1

This seems like a lot of work to me since your swap rates are easily measured and generally not at all the bottleneck that needs alleviating on OS X systems I've managed. Losing swap will be highly destructive to data integrity so you should have your system backed up regularly and able to be restored and files reconstructed if they become corrupt during a ...


0

Fusion Drive technology is part of the Mac OS itself. Windows cannot use it. It can, of course see the Core Storage Drive & its NTFS partition & boot from it, but it cannot use the hybrid technology underlying 'Fusion' itself. Bootcamp will make the NTFS partition purely on the HD. btw, Bootcamp is the only way to add the extra partition to a ...


0

If you're a pretty technically savvy, i don't think you need Fusion Drive because you could do it yourself. Invest in a 256 go SSD drive, divided into two partitions, one for each systems. Move all your heavy folders on your Terabyte (or more) HDD drive. /Users/MyUserName/Downloads /Users/MyUserName/Pictures /Users/MyUserName/Movies /Users/MyUserName/Music ...


1

In my opinion it shouldn't be a problem: delete the CoreStorage LVG (FusionDrive) and end with 2 seperate disks: the SSD and the HDD. Install Mac OS X on the SSD. use the Bootcamp Camp Assistant to install Windows 7/8 on the SSD partition the HDD according to your needs (HFS+ & NTFS/HFS+/NTFS) You will end with a partition layout similar to that: ...


1

Since FusionDrive is really Corestorage with some added magic (or supposed to), there is no mandatory reason to assign the whole SSD to the Fusion drive. When creating you DIY Fusion drive, just reserve space by creating adequate partitions and refer to the partition ID (diskXsY) instead of the whole disk.


0

Turns out resetting PRAM and NVRAM via pressing ⌘+⌥+P+R at boot (before the gray screen appears; hold until computer restarts and the startup chime has been heard twice). I have since successfully booted both OSX and Ubuntu via rEFInd without any excessive waiting.


1

the sluggishness may come from newer O/S upgrades that have degraded the performance of the computer. I say this because Mac O/S rarely has the "bitrot" issues that plague Windows, making it necessary (if not just advisable) to reinstall the O/S every 3-4 years. So if you have kept up with the O/S upgrades that may actually be the culprit. There are also ...


2

Take a single Time Machine backup, just in case. When you wipe the laptop, use the Time Machine drive to selectively (manually) restore certain items. Information and files related to application licensing will most often be located in: ~/Library/ ~/Library/Application Support ~/Library/Preferences


0

IN DISK UTILITY SELECTED PARTITION THEN MADE 1 PARTITION ADDED A NAME FOR THIS SSD PARTITION AND APPLIED. THIS DID THE TRICK. NOW I CAN SEE NEW SSD IN FINDER AND CAN LOAD INDIVIDUAL FILES AND ALSO SEE IN CARBON COPY CLONER FOR FULL CLONE BACK UP.


0

Before you can clone your hard drive with CarbonCopyCloner, you need to create a partition on the drive and format it appropriately for use with your Mac. Most external drives come pre-formatted for use with Windows machines. You can use Disk Utility for this purpose. You'll find Disk Utility under /Applications/Utilities/Disk Utility on your machine. In ...



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