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4

Hard drive cable failure is almost guaranteed to be your problem. We have a deployment of around 70 2012 13" MBPs for staff members, of which around 10% have had a hard drive cable failure. I had a suspicion you were going to say you had the same model from the symptoms you described. The symptoms on our problem MacBooks are exactly the same as yours with ...


2

I can speak from experience - I've got a 32GB USB drive, 8GB of which are a Yosemite installer and 24GB of which are normal storage. It works perfectly!


2

I would go with the SSD. First you can check to see how much benefit you would get from upgrading the RAM. You can look at the Activity Monitor.app memory section. The last several versions of Mac OS X have a graph describing "Memory Pressure", which is a way of describing how hard you are pushing the RAM. The OS will naturally try to make use of ALL of the ...


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To solve the problems we have to place the HDD on the original place. Then we place the SSD to the SuperDrive place. Just install Yosemite as usual and everything is working now.


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Open up activity monitor and check your RAM usage. If it's high pressure (check the graph), or even swapping files, you will benefit from more RAM. Any computer will benefit heavily from installing an SSD. Expect everything to go 10x faster (not kidding). Also, it will make you not having enough RAM less of a problem, as it will speed up your swap. So it ...


1

Carbon Copy Cloner - which can also create Recovery partitions - though it does need to get it from somewhere. You can clone your boot drive whilst booted from it, with no issues. Then just swap drives. If you first clone without the Recovery partition option, you then have 2 identical drives to attempt the Internet Recovery on, with a full safety copy. ...


1

The TRIM command was introduced to facilitate “garbage collection” of deleted data, allowing the SSD to reset those “unused” blocks back to an “empty” state. This allows for better performance for many SSDs. All Chameleon does is hack your SSD to enable TRIM. What the hack does is basically tell the OS that the non-Apple SSDs in the system are Apple drives ...


1

When I purchased my early 2013 MacBook Pro with Retina Display, as well as a previous MacBook Pro seven years earlier, I specifically asked about changing the HDD and RAM in the older one and the SSD in the newer one myself and in both instances I was told that it didn't void the warranty as long as there was no evidence that the work done by myself was the ...


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Yep it'll be compatible, your HDD is a SATA II. But because of the SATA2 limitation (~300MB/s) you won't be able to use your SSD at full speed.


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Yes, that drive will work for your Macbook. However, keep in mind that your machine uses a SATA II interface. This means that the maximum throughout is 300 MB/s. Though SATA III drives, such as the one you link to, are backwards compatible, there’s no benefit to spending the extra money. You are better off finding a SATA II SSD. Either way, you will notice a ...


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I have that same model and have a 240GB SSD from OWC in it. Have had for probably two years. It works very well and since you just need a 3G model you can get one for like $125.00 or so.


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I may be an Apple cool-aid drinker, but the answer is still yes. I code for a living on a PC but have never personally owned a PC. I am deeply engrained in the Mac experience and every day at work I miss the subtle, simple, and elegant nuances of MAC OS. I've cussed Windows about some thing every day for 14 consecutive years. My Mac experience from a user ...


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Agree. SSD upgrade will make everything you do on that laptop faster. More memory will only kick in as a boost from time to time. If you do a lot of compiling, all those little include files will hit the SSD sweet spot and you'll feel like you have a new computer.


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http://blog.macsales.com/18244-owc-diys-wont-void-your-macs-warranty The link above states the following: "We address this topic directly with customers via our support portals and are happy to inform you here of the same fact: upgrading your Mac does not void its warranty. This consumer protection is owed to the little known Magnuson-Moss Warranty Act of ...



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