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Copy your home directory over to the other drive. Open up System Preferences then the Users & Groups pane. Click the padlock to unlock it Right-click on your name Change the Home Directory to point to your newly copied one on the other drive. NB. You might want to use a syncing program to do the copy, or create a different user to do the copy as after ...


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Take a single Time Machine backup, just in case. When you wipe the laptop, use the Time Machine drive to selectively (manually) restore certain items. Information and files related to application licensing will most often be located in: ~/Library/ ~/Library/Application Support ~/Library/Preferences


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If you're running OS X on a HDD then I don't see how TRIM enters the equation, since TRIM is only for SSDs. If want to do a fresh install on the SSD, simply install it and proceed with your bootable USB, I do not see the problem. What I did when installing the SSD was to put it in an enclosure, connect it via USB and use Carbon Copy Cloner to clone the OS ...


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Here are some points from my Upgrade of my old iMac (late 2009, Model 10,1, #A1312) You can expect a significant Performance increase when starting Apps or saving Data, but overall-performance is depends on you RAM size too. If you are working with Photoshop f.e. you should def. have more than 8GB (on 10.10) - the more the better. You will encounter ...


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As you know with SATA connection you get 3 to 6 Gb/s. With Firewire you get < 1 Gb/s data transfer. To be specific: Firewire 800 is 800 Mbits/s (Mb/s) not 800 Mbytes/s (MB/s) [8 bits in a byte] its a common misconception. so Firewire 800 is rated up to 80 MB/s.


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the sluggishness may come from newer O/S upgrades that have degraded the performance of the computer. I say this because Mac O/S rarely has the "bitrot" issues that plague Windows, making it necessary (if not just advisable) to reinstall the O/S every 3-4 years. So if you have kept up with the O/S upgrades that may actually be the culprit. There are also ...


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Since FusionDrive is really Corestorage with some added magic (or supposed to), there is no mandatory reason to assign the whole SSD to the Fusion drive. When creating you DIY Fusion drive, just reserve space by creating adequate partitions and refer to the partition ID (diskXsY) instead of the whole disk.


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In my opinion it shouldn't be a problem: delete the CoreStorage LVG (FusionDrive) and end with 2 seperate disks: the SSD and the HDD. Install Mac OS X on the SSD. use the Bootcamp Camp Assistant to install Windows 7/8 on the SSD partition the HDD according to your needs (HFS+ & NTFS/HFS+/NTFS) You will end with a partition layout similar to that: ...


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This is normal behaviour for Yosemite for users with FileVault enabled (i.e. Your Mac's primary disk is encrypted). The authentication process is done earlier because without authorisation from the user the OS cannot access the rest of the disk. This is a good thing, and I think you are (mostly) mistaken that it takes longer to boot up — since now you are ...


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The Boot Camp Assistant will move any file (if any) which may reside in your future Windows partition to a appropriate position in your then shrinked Mac partition before creating unallocated disk space in the repartitioning process. Therefore there is absolutely no need to defrag in the forefront. Please read Do partitions on SSDs map to physical addresses? ...


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Ha, found it! It was a corrupted ".Trashes" folder in the root of the SSD. It occupied me than 100GB of data (see screenshot). I managed to make these files visible by running GrandPerspective from the command line: sudo GrandPerspective.app/Contents/MacOS/GrandPerspective That will show the files but still it is not possible to delete them. Even sudo ...



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