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4

Download the installer to the current system While it downloads, partition the SSD as GPT/OS X Extended Run the installer and install the OS onto the SSD instead of the current boot drive Use Startup Disk preference pane to set the new SSD as the boot volume default - NVRAM points to the SSD for all subsequent boots


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If you boot to the Recovery Drive (restart holding Command and R) you'll get a window with an option to "Re-install MAC OSX". Choose this and then choose your SSD as the target. When installation is complete, go to System Preferences > Hard Disk and select your SSD as the boot drive. Alternatively, you can reboot holding Alt/Option and you will be asked to ...


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In the past, Apple doesn't upgrade any storage as a rule. This is HDD/SSD across the board. The only exceptions I've known are: If you have several internal bays and you buy the part (Think Mac Pro with 4 SATA bays or Xserve / Xserve RAID) You are paying for a service repair and they upgrade you for free to a larger drive. You don't ask for it, but Apple ...


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Just because the hardware is set to remember where the last boot was from and will look back to it at the bext boot, I can recommend you to hold down the C button right after you start up the fully assembled system and then select the SSD again. Also note that the cable that connects the internally placed SSD may be damaged/disconnected somehow or even the ...


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The physical interface(s) or form factor(s) are Apple proprietary. The different SSDs have 6+12/12+16/8+18/7+17 pins. The electrical/logical interface is PCIe 2.0 2x or 4x (everymac.com also mentions SATA for some older MacBook Airs). Several adapters for different MacBook (Air) SSDs are available here. Example: MacBook Air Mid 2013 SSD to PCI-e 4X. Please ...


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After 4 years of abusing all manner of Apple selected SSD, I can conclusively say that the drives I have used are more reliable than HDD and have exhibited none of the potential drawbacks or cost associated with HDD failure modes in practice. For the first few computers I purchased, I did pay for AppleCare for several reasons. I had decent discounts on it ...


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Just a point on scratch drives - SSD's are not recommended for scratch (virtual memory) in 2015 for two reasons (there may be more) - SSD's don't enjoy constant overwrite and data swappping and it will reduce the life of an expensive drive. Using a clean partition set aside on an internal Sata drive such as a WD Black (with 64MB on board cache) will be more ...


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I'm battling the same problem with my Mid 2007 (7.1) iMac running Snow Leopard. Cloned new 2 tb Seagate SATA drive in a external USB enclosure, removed 300gb Hitachi Deskstar internal drive (probably not the original) and installed the "booting when USB" Seagate in the internal mounting. Will not boot either drive, new Seagate as internal and won't boot ...


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All SATA SSDs will work with your MacBook. There is actually no such thing as an SSD only suitable for Mac however a few companies do advertise like this. So basically any SATA SSD from any brand and with any capacity will work with your MacBook, just make sure that it is a 2.5" internal SSD :) Before you do actually change to a SSD I recommend you ...


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The 900MB speed is realistic, this is achieved on a few of apple's new mac offerings. An external Thunderbolt SSD would not be as fast, the only way to make it the same speed (or possibly faster) is if you have a multidrive thunderbolt enclosure running in something like Raid-0 with SSDs in all slots. The prior enclosure would be rather expensive ...


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The Retina MacBooks use a format of SSD that can be replaced, but Apple does not make it especially easy for simple replacement. Rather than the more familiar 2.5" HD format you might be familar with, the Retina use a newer blade style, somewhat similar to memory modules. Your best bet it to look over the ifixit guides, to see what is involved: ...


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No, that SSD is not compatible with your MacBook Pro, as the form factor is different. Your Mac takes "blade" SSD, while the one on Amazon is the regular old hard drive-like enclosure. Personally, I recommend Intel for SSDs, I've had great luck with them.


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The iMac 21.5" Mid 2011 shipped with "500 GB, 1, or 2 TB (7200-rpm SATA) and/or 256 GB (SSD)" Storage and its Hard Drive Interface is "6.0 Gbps Serial ATA (SATA)". So any normal 6.0 Gbps SATA SSD should work. As an example, from Crucial, Apple iMac (21.5 and 27-inch, Mid 2011) compatible upgrades


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As you write, Apple seems to have undertaken some effort to make replacement of the internal HDD difficult, as described here: For the main 3.5″ SATA hard drive bay in the new 2011 machines, Apple has altered the SATA power connector itself from a standard 4-wire power configuration to a 7-wire configuration. Hard drive temperature control is regulated ...



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